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View Full Version : Pet peeves (or, don't ever do that again!)



DKayne
04-18-2014, 08:00 AM
Just like there are purists in any walk of life, I am quite confident there are ukulele purists. And, while there are different techniques to achieve the same (or similar sound), I am quite confident there are a few no-nos.

When watching a newbie (or even an intermediate player), are there times when you are watching a person play and they are doing something that just raises the hackles on your neck? What are they doing? What uke pet peeves do you have?

This is just more out of curiosity than anything. Plus, I want to make sure Im not doing anything that will make anyone want to confiscate my uke.

Ramart
04-18-2014, 08:22 AM
Listening, more so than "watching," would be my trigger for potential annoyance. Mechanically rhythmic strumming, with no nuance in tempo, maybe?

But since we all play primarily to entertain ourselves, the thing I'd change, if I noticed a listener's hackles had been raised, would be my audience.

mailman
04-18-2014, 08:24 AM
Let me begin by saying that I would not try to tell anyone (who hadn't asked) what to do or not to do while playing their uke. It's meant to be fun. Do your own thing, and all that.

That being said, there are a couple of things that bother me when I see other uke players doing them.

#1. Fretting the strings with the thumb. I know it works for some folks. I guess maybe it's easier in some circumstances. But it bugs me.

#2. Playing the ukulele with a guitar pick. If you want to play a guitar, well, go get a guitar.

#3. Folks hanging a uke strap around their neck like a camera strap, with both sides coming over their collar bones.


Sorry. You asked me, so I felt obligated to tell you.... :D

hoosierhiver
04-18-2014, 08:26 AM
Tuning onstage

mailman
04-18-2014, 08:44 AM
Tuning onstage

In that same vein, I once saw a ukulele orchestra perform. Not only did they tune on stage, but almost all of them left their tuners on their headstocks, and LIT UP, throughout the performance. Very distracting....

Dan Uke
04-18-2014, 08:46 AM
being told I'm doing something wrong when they can't play any better

savagehenry
04-18-2014, 08:51 AM
My pet peeve is when somebody tells me I'm doing something wrong when I dont ask for their help or opinion.

strumsilly
04-18-2014, 08:54 AM
Well , the first thing that came to mind was thumb fretting, but hey, it worked great for Ritchie Havens. man could he strum. RIP
as for playing with a pick, if I'm playing with louder instruments [guitar/bass/etc.] I play my 8 with a pick. that way I can at least hear myself.

janeray1940
04-18-2014, 08:55 AM
being told I'm doing something wrong when they can't play any better

Ha! Good one. And I sure hope I've never done that to anybody!

I'm usually so focused on what *I* am doing wrong so I don't really notice others that much, but a few things that I have found crazy-making:

1) Not staying in tempo when playing in an ensemble. I've seen this happen in both newbies (okay, forgiveable, but still...) and experienced players (who would pretty much rather solo and do their own thing than play in time with the group).

2) Playing an out of tune uke. If you can't tune by ear (I can't), buy a few tuners and keep one in every case so that you're not caught without one.

3) If you're playing in a group and can't actually *play* the song the group is playing, just sit it out and listen respectfully and learn. Do not - and yes, this has actually happened - turn your uke over and start thumping on it like a drum, trying to keep rhythm and "conduct" the group. ESPECIALLY do not do this if you can't keep rhythm and don't know the difference between a 3/4 and 4/4 time. Please.

As for the other technique-type stuff, which fingers one uses to fret or strum, etc - eh, anything goes as far as I'm concerned. Make it work for you. I finger chords in weird ways, I use a thumb pick sometimes since my darned thumb nail refuses to grow, I play triads instead of tetrads if the note in question is too much of a stretch for my little hands. I'm sure there are purists who would take issue with all of this, but in the end it's not impacting anybody else so I don't see a problem :)

Mattyukaholic
04-18-2014, 09:07 AM
I agree. Anything goes so well as it sounds good. I don't care how someone frets their instrument or strums as long a they're enjoying themselves and/or it sounds good.
You'd never teach someone to play an ukulele with chopsticks but James Hill makes that sound good!!

Whilst we're on it though, my pet peeve is the whole hipster ukulele thing and those whimsical backing tracks you get on adverts over here. I used to go to so many indie gigs with hipsters playing ukuleles with a plectrum and thinking they were automatically a quirky genius.

I love an understated yet accomplished performance. I was watching Ken Middleton play Worried Man Blues on YouTube today. He plays in an understated way but with such ease and he gets an incredibly lovely sound out of his ukuleles. That's what I aspire to.

OldePhart
04-18-2014, 10:08 AM
I think the only ukulele "pet peeve" I have is when somebody is playing an instrument that is really out of tune or has really poor intonation. I just really can't listen to it - it's like fingernails on a blackboard to me anymore. I'm not going to say anything about it, though, I just remove myself from the presence of the irritation. :)

Now...shakers and tambourines...those drive me absolutely nuts. A shaker is okay in the hands of someone that knows what to do with it but it seems like most people that show up with them in hand aren't that someone. I remember once a guy showed up at a jam with three egg shakers in each hand and proceeded to shake the daylights out of them with no discernible sense of rhythm or dynamics - he might have gotten better results if he'd put them in a sock and let the dog attack them.

Tambourines are even worse because I can only take a limited amount of that particular noise even in the hands of someone who is a really good percussionist. Shakers and tambourines are like bohdrans at Irish sessions...often brought by people who think "anyone can play this."

John

stringy
04-18-2014, 10:43 AM
I like this thread! These are things most of us would never say to someone. It is nice to vent.

1. Playing an 'out of tune' uke. The big problem is you get use to what you hear and you won't even know it.

2. Keeping the tuner clipped on the headstock while playing (after the strings have been played in) If your uke still goes out that bad you need to invest in a proper instrument.

3. Playing an uke that does not intonate properly or that buzzes.

Why is it the worst sounding ukes are usually played the LOUDEST! By the way, I am not talking about the talent of the player here. Many of them are way better than me. I am talking about the low quality, tingy, out of tune, instrument that many seem to think sound just fine.

mvinsel
04-18-2014, 10:54 AM
My pet peeve is too much use of the uke body as a drum. I don't mind it very sparingly for punctuation here and there, but when it is the main use of the uke in a song, I'd rather hear the player play the uke.
-Vinnie in Juneau

Brad Bordessa
04-18-2014, 11:04 AM
Poor timing.
Students running their mouths during a lesson.
Know-it-alls. We can all teach each other something, but don't act like the next guy is a noob when he's not.

Dan Uke
04-18-2014, 11:05 AM
Actually it doesn't bother me as uke people are nice and most do it in a very tackful way. They are genuinely trying to help you.

Playing something in rhythm is probably the hardest thing to do in an ensemble because we typically know the songs at a certain tempo but play it much slower because not everyone can play it at a certain speed. So what do we do, ask that person to sit out and keep rhythm by tapping on their uke? hahaha Unfortunately, most of us are busy so don't put the practice in before any meeting, which is totally fine.

The funny thing about rhythm is that if you start speeding up, people intuitively follow you...if you decide to play it slower than everyone else, that's a trainwreck.




Ha! Good one. And I sure hope I've never done that to anybody!

I'm usually so focused on what *I* am doing wrong so I don't really notice others that much, but a few things that I have found crazy-making:

1) Not staying in tempo when playing in an ensemble. I've seen this happen in both newbies (okay, forgiveable, but still...) and experienced players (who would pretty much rather solo and do their own thing than play in time with the group).

2) Playing an out of tune uke. If you can't tune by ear (I can't), buy a few tuners and keep one in every case so that you're not caught without one.

3) If you're playing in a group and can't actually *play* the song the group is playing, just sit it out and listen respectfully and learn. Do not - and yes, this has actually happened - turn your uke over and start thumping on it like a drum, trying to keep rhythm and "conduct" the group. ESPECIALLY do not do this if you can't keep rhythm and don't know the difference between a 3/4 and 4/4 time. Please.

As for the other technique-type stuff, which fingers one uses to fret or strum, etc - eh, anything goes as far as I'm concerned. Make it work for you. I finger chords in weird ways, I use a thumb pick sometimes since my darned thumb nail refuses to grow, I play triads instead of tetrads if the note in question is too much of a stretch for my little hands. I'm sure there are purists who would take issue with all of this, but in the end it's not impacting anybody else so I don't see a problem :)

JeremyR
04-18-2014, 11:35 AM
I Must say I am surprised some people are actually bothered by thumb fretting. I get not doing it if you don't like it, but who cares how someone else frets their instrument? They can fret with their forehead for all I care.

Thumb fretting has been around in the guitar community for years, and while some folks will tell you it is not orthodox technique (and they would be correct), I've never once heard someone say it bugged them to see someone else do it.

Telperion
04-18-2014, 12:03 PM
The main occupation of my forehead is fretting. :p

Nice one, Jon!

janeray1940
04-18-2014, 12:05 PM
So what do we do, ask that person to sit out and keep rhythm by tapping on their uke?

No, maybe I wasn't clear - what I meant was PLEASE DON'T keep rhythm on your uke if you can't play the song! If you don't know the song or can't play the song, lay out.

The speeding up thing is just something that happens. Having a strong rhythm player or two helps; having a bassist helps even more. Practicing with a metronome helps A LOT if everyone does it, but few do.

hoosierhiver
04-18-2014, 12:16 PM
I've got another one,
Apologizing before you start playing.

janeray1940
04-18-2014, 12:21 PM
I've got another one,
Apologizing before you start playing.

Yes! Or stopping and apologizing and explaining yourself EVERY TIME you make a mistake while you are playing. Just keep going, mistakes happen!

(And, wow. I had no idea I had so many pet peeves about this stuff but... yeah...)

Shady Wilbury
04-18-2014, 12:22 PM
I second the above, although I've done it on occasion.

After reading various posts here, I've made a conscious effort to unclip my tuner from my guitar headstock when playing out. (I don't really play out with the uke, because my repertoire is so limited.)

Further to the apologising, my pet peeve is people who stop halfway through a song because they've made a small mistake that nobody hearing the song for the first time would know about.

Dan Uke
04-18-2014, 12:23 PM
No, maybe I wasn't clear - what I meant was PLEASE DON'T keep rhythm on your uke if you can't play the song! If you don't know the song or can't play the song, lay out.

Sorry, I understood you but was being facetious but I guess it wasn't that funny...that's my pet peeve, odd humor like mine. :p

stringy
04-18-2014, 12:24 PM
I've got another one,
Apologizing before you start playing.



And for some....Not apologizing before you start playing :)

janeray1940
04-18-2014, 12:25 PM
Sorry, I understood you but was being facetious but I guess it wasn't that funny...that's my pet peeve, odd humor like mine. :p

Humor can be tricky in pixels :)

stringy
04-18-2014, 12:36 PM
I also cringe when someone announces they have perfect pitch. I could never use the word perfect to describe anything about myself. "I have a good ear" would be sufficient, even if you actually do have perfect pitch.

PeteyHoudini
04-18-2014, 12:39 PM
tuner on headstock!

Petey!

CeeJay
04-18-2014, 12:41 PM
Thumb fretting is an ace accomplishment (ask a Balalaika player ) and you shouldn't really judge ...the individual concerned may have a pain or joint problem.........I fret with a thumb now and again because of wrist pain.... and because I can play a balalaika (not well)

Sometimes playing out of tempo or off beat in a group environment is down to not being familiar with the piece as played because you are new to the group...come on we all have to learn ...telling someone to sit out and learn by tapping your uke would get a very definite reaction from me ..the tap would be somewhere un-expected but deeply appropriate ....:D (I am joking, before I get accused of losing the Ahalo spirit)

I just joined my first ever Uke group...I love it ...I am the "newbie" to a group environment and I have to hold back with the strumming.....

A) because most of the group play with plectrums , you know those felt plectrum thingies...I could not care less......it is their group and I feel privileged to be accepted and allowed to join in .......




B) I am probably the longest playing member of that group but again A) applies so softly I sit and strum with my fingers....and learn the songs of the group and how they play them ...and have super fun...

C) I do not see why ukes cannot be played with plectrums..they can sound brilliant and mandolin like ....and I have in fact experimented with a mandolin and retuned it as a Low G uke ...only to discover why it always sounded shit as a mandolin ...because it is a cheap Ozark and E strings (uke tuning A string mando)goes from open E to F # on the first fret two semitones .....so I presume the nut slot is too high ...(Luthiers --help ?)

D) If someone is doing something wrong or daft or annoying ...well tell them...however I get the impression that people just want to be vile and hurtful and enjoy ripping people apart ...just because they can...tell people gently ..and pleasantly and nicely and constructively....then their reaction dictates the way forward ...Lizzy , my wife has joined our group ( oooh "our group" already) as the tambour-egger-iner (not having a dig Olde Pharte) ..the first thing she did was explain that she had no intention of playing or learning to play a ukey-lay lay
but would like to sing and do a bit of percussion (as a complete novice ) if that was okay and please to say if it was or was not Okay...........so far it is okay ..but she always asks for and gets advice and feedback (in fact feedback on an acoustic tambourine takes some doing and has to be applauded )....



Sorry ...is long ...like my cat.

Strumdaddy
04-18-2014, 01:10 PM
The uke is a fun instrument - if you're playing one you're already winning, and there's not a lot you could do to annoy me..... BUT....
I do switch off a bit when someone plays a song and tries to sound EXACTLY like the original. That's a good place to start, but I am much more interested when a song is adapted to sound good on a uke - ie. ukify it!!!

itsme
04-18-2014, 01:12 PM
People who refer to the first string (A) as the "bottom" string. No, that's the "top" string.

"The uke is tuned like the bottom four strings of the guitar with a capo at the fifth fret." No, it's tuned like the top four strings of the guitar capo'd at the fifth fret. :rolleyes:

Urgh! Drives me nuts and so many people do it that it perpetuates the wrong nomenclature because, hey, "I read it on UU from someone who's been playing longer than me so it must be true."

kwall
04-18-2014, 01:39 PM
i dont like how many people buy the 30 dollar ukulele and learn it for a few months think they know everything then collects dust. Maybe its just cause they r so cool right now but over two years of playing ive noticed more ``ukulele `` players. Who then two months later are onto the next cool trend, i get some people dont like the feel or just give up and such but as a musician it hurts me.

I also get annoyed at people who collect, without playing. A musical instrument is to be played... not to collect dust or look shiny..

sorry if ive offended anyone, it just bugs me.

stringy
04-18-2014, 01:45 PM
The ukulele is a gateway to music for a lot of people. The only no no is to not to get started on the singing and playing. Perhaps there are a few things you can do that might damage the instrument, like destroy the top with a hard pick, but they would never be peeves.*
Tolerance is one of the best attributes of any ukulele player or group.
There are plenty of bands and orchestras around for those who like to perform a lot and rabbit on about perfection. So if you do feel that you are getting a lot of pet peeves maybe it is time to move on to musically something else like guitar or violin or trumpet?


So is your pet peeve the people who want to hear an ukulele played in tune and intonated properly without the tuner clipped to the headstock???

CeeJay
04-18-2014, 02:06 PM
The uke is a fun instrument - if you're playing one you're already winning, and there's not a lot you could do to annoy me..... BUT....
I do switch off a bit when someone plays a song and tries to sound EXACTLY like the original. That's a good place to start, but I am much more interested when a song is adapted to sound good on a uke - ie. ukify it!!!


Umm..agree ..I love to hear ( and attempt to play) guitar and other instrumental music, played on a uke ....but I prefer to hear it played as a uke

not trying to slavishly imitate the original instrument....but that 's a peccadilo ..not a peeve ...well my peccadilo anyway...it could be your peeve....

Rick Turner
04-18-2014, 02:15 PM
I think some folks should stop listening with their eyes...

Why on earth does anyone care if a player keeps a tuner clipped to a peghead? If you're playing before an audience and playing anything complicated and not with a mass of ukes where nobody can hear any one uke, little tuning touchups are a gift to your audience. I play jazz and standards with another uke player, and precise tuning really counts with how we voice chords together. If he or I want a tuner on the peghead, we're going to clip that Snark on there. It can be particularly hard to hear pitch really well when up on stage in front of an audience.

Plectrums...you must hate the Chalmers Doane students. Don't go see "The Mighty Uke". Plectrum city there....

Thumb fretting...one of my clients who is a wonderful jazz guitarist uses her thumb all the time for bass parts on her steel string guitar, and she's not just strumming away a la Richie Havens. Once again, don't watch, just listen.

Collectors...have saved many a uke (and guitar) from being landfill. Pick up the latest Ukulele Magazine and check out the article on my friend and Uke Ellington band-mate, Sandor Nagyszalanczy. Sandor has about 430 ukes lovingly preserved, played, and displayed at his house here near Santa Cruz, and he plays them really well.

stringy
04-18-2014, 02:29 PM
I think some folks should stop listening with their eyes...
Why on earth does anyone care if a player keeps a tuner clipped to a peghead? If you're playing before an audience and playing anything complicated and not with a mass of ukes where nobody can hear any one uke, little tuning touchups are a gift to your audience."


I think it is better to stop listening to your clip on tuner!
If you are good enough to play in front of a audience you should be able to tweak it by ear. That would be a gift to your audience.

wickedwahine11
04-18-2014, 02:30 PM
My only uke pet peeve are people that are intolerant of other uke players. For example, a real ukulele is only high g (or low g), you should only use wound (or unwound) strings, you should only have koa ukes (or mahogany, or spruce...), you should only play soprano (or tenor...), you should only buy Hawaiian made (or why not just buy cheap ukes), you should have more than one uke (you should only have one uke), the best ukes must be eye candy (or people waste money paying for looks), or the "best brand" is ____.

The list could go on and on. I see endless posts where people espouse their way as the only "right" way when to me, the only way is the way that works for YOU! Play a high g soprano import with a pick, or low g on a custom creation. I don't care, if it makes you happy, it is fine by me. Live and let live.

We all have preferences, and favorites (sure, I have an opinion on all that stuff listed above but it us just my opinion - the people that say their way is the only way are my pet peeve.

SailQwest
04-18-2014, 02:30 PM
The dealbreaker for me...poorly tuned and/or poorly intonated instruments. Aural torture. Ugh. If I hand someone a tuner, it's not merely a suggestion. I leave a mini-tuner clipped onto my headstock (as do my regular playmates).

Rick Turner
04-18-2014, 02:43 PM
"I think it is better to stop listening to your clip on tuner!
If you are good enough to play in front of a audience you should be able to tweak it by ear. That would be a gift to your audience."

I guess you've never played to a bar full of folks having a good time drinking, talking, and listening...a bit. Try being the "walk in" band at our uke club here in Santa Cruz sometime and tell me how well you can hear your uke.

I happen to have a good ear. I can tune just fine when I'm practicing solo or with my band. I'm fine with an attentive audience and reasonable monitors. But in much of the real world, a Snark gets me there quicker if I absolutely need to tune, and that's usually when I have fresh strings on.

And I really don't see why anybody should care as long as the results are an in-tune uke. To me, worrying about someone else's choice to use a tuner is like a guitar player getting all uppity about someone using a capo. Great snob attitude, but it has nothing to do with musical quality. But I guess if one gets off on a feeling of superiority behind something that insignificant...well...fine.

CeeJay
04-18-2014, 03:01 PM
My only uke pet peeve are people that are intolerant of other uke players. For example, a real ukulele is only high g (or low g), you should only use wound (or unwound) strings, you should only have koa ukes (or mahogany, or spruce...), you should only play soprano (or tenor...), you should only buy Hawaiian made (or why not just buy cheap ukes), you should have more than one uke (you should only have one uke), the best ukes must be eye candy (or people waste money paying for looks), or the "best brand" is ____.

The list could go on and on. I see endless posts where people espouse their way as the only "right" way when to me, the only way is the way that works for YOU! Play a high g soprano import with a pick, or low g on a custom creation. I don't care, if it makes you happy, it is fine by me. Live and let live.

We all have preferences, and favorites (sure, I have an opinion on all that stuff listed above but it us just my opinion - the people that say their way is the only way are my pet peeve.

You are my newest bestest friend ..(Like it or NOT...'Kay :D ) I could not have put this so nicely and would probably have been removed from the forum....Kudos

stringy
04-18-2014, 03:04 PM
" Great snob attitude, but it has nothing to do with musical quality. But I guess if one gets off on a feeling of superiority behind something that insignificant...well...fine."


I don't think there is anything in life I am superior at. I just think it is corny to play with a tuner clipped to the headstock. But if I was in the audience I would still applaud for you :)

CeeJay
04-18-2014, 03:07 PM
"I think it is better to stop listening to your clip on tuner!
If you are good enough to play in front of a audience you should be able to tweak it by ear. That would be a gift to your audience."

I guess you've never played to a bar full of folks having a good time drinking, talking, and listening...a bit. Try being the "walk in" band at our uke club here in Santa Cruz sometime and tell me how well you can hear your uke.

I happen to have a good ear. I can tune just fine when I'm practicing solo or with my band. I'm fine with an attentive audience and reasonable monitors. But in much of the real world, a Snark gets me there quicker if I absolutely need to tune, and that's usually when I have fresh strings on.

And I really don't see why anybody should care as long as the results are an in-tune uke. To me, worrying about someone else's choice to use a tuner is like a guitar player getting all uppity about someone using a capo. Great snob attitude, but it has nothing to do with musical quality. But I guess if one gets off on a feeling of superiority behind something that insignificant...well...fine.

I mean sometimes it is hard enough to tune with the tuner let alone your ear...seriously ..mine is so good a tuner that it picks up every other buggers instrument as well... !!! ..well it's a Korg so it must be good ...eh ?

Or not...arf arf...which is doggy laughter....

and I am so sorry but I misread "walk in" band ..as a Brit might and put an "n" in the wrong place ....sorry ..sorry..sorry...

Last line of quote...huge round of applause from the Jarvo corner .That's me btw..

UkerDanno
04-18-2014, 03:09 PM
low G fanatics...usually former guitar players.

aquadan
04-18-2014, 03:10 PM
I don't think there is anything in life I am superior at. I just think it is corny to play with a tuner clipped to the headstock. But if I was in the audience I would still applaud for you :)

Someone should let Jake know he's doing it wrong.

greenie44
04-18-2014, 03:13 PM
Further to the apologising, my pet peeve is people who stop halfway through a song because they've made a small mistake that nobody hearing the song for the first time would know about.

My oldest daughter started playing cello when she was 6, and had her first recitals in that year too. On a piece that she was playing in her second one, there was one phrase where she would almost invariably hit the wrong note - hit it well, but it was not what was written.

The day of the recital came and she started to play with an accompanist. Sure enough, she got to the note, hit the wrong one, and just kept on going. No one in the house besides her teacher and I noticed. I was really proud of her.

itsme
04-18-2014, 03:14 PM
I think it is better to stop listening to your clip on tuner!
If you are good enough to play in front of a audience you should be able to tweak it by ear. That would be a gift to your audience.
I have to disagree with this. Even if you are good at tweaking by ear (which many of us aren't), the noise on stage can make it difficult to tune. A clip-on tuner makes the job quicker and less distracting to the audience.

UkerDanno
04-18-2014, 03:28 PM
My oldest daughter started playing cello when she was 6, and had her first recitals in that year too. On a piece that she was playing in her second one, there was one phrase where she would almost invariably hit the wrong note - hit it well, but it was not what was written.

The day of the recital came and she started to play with an accompanist. Sure enough, she got to the note, hit the wrong one, and just kept on going. No one in the house besides her teacher and I noticed. I was really proud of her.

exactly, I make lots of mistakes and play it my own way and some people like it, including me and some don't, that's their problem.

CeeJay
04-18-2014, 03:35 PM
I have to admit I have a thing about tuners on headstocks. Sure, I get the need to have them in a loud bar or other venue. I'm "fortunate" enough to only ever play in small, intimate places - coffee shops, classrooms, nursing homes - where it's a non-issue. Seriously though, why do you need a tuner clipped on when you're recording a song for youtube in the comfort of your own home?

But that's gravy. My real pet peeve is people who leave the toilet seat up. You know who you are.

Oh bugger ...it's me ....I just got told off again ...by the missus

CeeJay
04-18-2014, 03:38 PM
" Great snob attitude, but it has nothing to do with musical quality. But I guess if one gets off on a feeling of superiority behind something that insignificant...well...fine."


I don't think there is anything in life I am superior at. I just think it is corny to play with a tuner clipped to the headstock. But if I was in the audience I would still applaud for you :)

I think it is just a convenient place ....I mean otherwise I would probably forget where I put the sodding thing!! And I don't even play in public...yet ....God help them...

hoosierhiver
04-18-2014, 03:43 PM
If it's a choice between a tuner on the headstock and listening to someone play out of tune, the clip on tuner wins every time for me.

Leigh Coates
04-18-2014, 03:51 PM
I had no idea that leaving the tuner on the headstock bothered so many people. :>)

stringy
04-18-2014, 03:52 PM
If it's a choice between a tuner on the headstock and listening to someone play out of tune, the clip on tuner wins every time for me.


Yeah, but how sad that is that!!!!!

actadh
04-18-2014, 04:02 PM
My ukulele keeps in tune, but I like looking at the tuner as I play for reinforcement that I am strumming the proper chord or to see the note on the tuner as I learn the fretboard.

Ukulele is such a pretty word - if I have a pet peeve it is to see it referred to as an ook or a uke.

mm stan
04-18-2014, 04:12 PM
Only one pet peeve....It's not what uke you play or how well you play, main thing you yourself get self enjoyment out if it..
like the guitar, there is this standard ''I'm better than you and got a nicer guitar than you senerio" to all of those I say, Get a grip of yourself and look in the mirror.
Get off your high horse and don't ruin it for the rest of us...:p

OldePhart
04-18-2014, 04:15 PM
Why on earth does anyone care if a player keeps a tuner clipped to a peghead?...

This is the one that was puzzling heck out of me, too; I'm glad I'm at least in good company. I'd much rather have somebody have a tuner clipped to the headstock than hear them play out of tune, for gosh sake! I keep mine turned off when I'm not actually using it, but even if someone leaves it on and flashing I can't see why that would be distracting...ever been to a rock concert? :rofl:

Edit: Oh, and as for why it's on my headstock, even when the strings are stretched in...I forget where I put stuff...if I leave it where it's used that becomes less of a problem. I've begun buying NS micro tuners for all of my ukes...

John

Ukejenny
04-18-2014, 04:44 PM
My only pet peeve is if people aren't enjoying it and getting into it. "To play a wrong note is insignificant; to play without passion is inexcusable." Ludwig van Beethoven

I also find it unfortunate when someone on here is rude or inconsiderate when a post is made by a less experienced player, or by anyone for that matter. There are so many supportive, uplifting and encouraging people on this forum, it really sticks out like a sore thumb when someone loses that ohana spirit.

Icelander53
04-18-2014, 06:05 PM
My pet peeve is humanity in general and most everything they do. I know that's pretty trivial but I wanted to be in this thread. :cheers:

greenie44
04-18-2014, 06:37 PM
Finally thought of something - people who, when they find I play ukulele, ask if I know Tiptoe Through The Tulips. No offense, Mr. Tim.

hmgberg
04-18-2014, 06:54 PM
I had no idea tuners on the head stock pissed so many people off; I affixed mine permanently with Super Glue, thinking that way the ukulele would stay in tune.

janeray1940
04-18-2014, 06:58 PM
Finally thought of something - people who, when they find I play ukulele, ask if I know Tiptoe Through The Tulips. No offense, Mr. Tim.

That one actually doesn't bother me, but a few years ago people asking if I could play that Soul Sister song used to get to me.


I had no idea tuners on the head stock pissed so many people off; I affixed mine permanently with Super Glue, thinking that way the ukulele would stay in tune.

Did it work?? :)

I have those little mini-tuners on all of my ukes. I never take them off (but I always turn them off after tuning, as I get distracted by flashing lights). Now I'm going to be all self-conscious that I'm pissing people off...

mds725
04-18-2014, 07:21 PM
This thread reminded me of the book "Play Well With Others - A Musician's Guide to Jamming Like a Pro."
http://www.amazon.com/Play-Others-Musicians-Guide-Jamming/dp/0974360635

I used to get annoyed in my uke group when the person leading a song didn't count the group in (which meant that we didn't know the tempo) or, worse yet, counted in at a speed other than the tempo at which he or she then began to play. Now, whenever I begin to get annoyed at an ukulele jam, I instead think about how fortunate I am to have a body that allows me to play an instrument and that I am otherwise healthy enough to be able to enjoy being in a room full of people who are playing and singing. Forgive me for being crude, but I also think of the old saying, "I don't care which hand you masturbate with. It isn't my orgasm." If a person is most comfortable playing with a clip-on tuner on his or her headstock, or using a thumb to fret, who am I to make that person's playing experience less fun for him or her by being annoyed at how he or she makes himself or herself happy? One request, though - if you're one of those people who gouges soundboards when you play, please let me know BEFORE I lend you my ukulele.

Gillian
04-18-2014, 07:32 PM
I agree with the peeve of folks not keeping their ukes in tune. Other than that, I don't have any peeves regarding what a player does with their uke as long as they are having a good time. The following is not a peeve, but a question:

Why do some people keep coils of string attached to their ukes' headstocks? I've seen gorgeous ukes where the luthier has done beautiful inlays, or slotted headstocks with multiple veneers, etc., only to be hidden by a snarl of strings.

Is there a practical reason for doing this?

Dan Uke
04-18-2014, 07:45 PM
I agree with the peeve of folks not keeping their ukes in tune. Other than that, I don't have any peeves regarding what a player does with their uke as long as they are having a good time. The following is not a peeve, but a question:

Why do some people keep coils of string attached to their ukes' headstocks? I've seen gorgeous ukes where the luthier has done beautiful inlays, or slotted headstocks with multiple veneers, etc., only to be hidden by a snarl of strings.

Is there a practical reason for doing this?

I do that sometimes thinking I will change the strings if I don't like them. However, I end up cutting all of them if I don't like them. Secondly, I've had several instances where the string snaps when I cut them short as soon as I put them on. I am not sure why that is but it has happened. So in short, I'm lazy. :p

kohanmike
04-18-2014, 08:34 PM
I'm going to refrain from answering because I'm guilty of at least a few of the listed peeves. "He who lives in a glass house..."

tainauke
04-18-2014, 09:12 PM
This thread reminded me of the book "Play Well With Others - A Musician's Guide to Jamming Like a Pro."
http://www.amazon.com/Play-Others-Musicians-Guide-Jamming/dp/0974360635

I used to get annoyed in my uke group when the person leading a song didn't count the group in (which meant that we didn't know the tempo) or, worse yet, counted in at a speed other than the tempo at which he or she then began to play. Now, whenever I begin to get annoyed at an ukulele jam, I instead think about how fortunate I am to have a body that allows me to play an instrument and that I am otherwise healthy enough to be able to enjoy being in a room full of people who are playing and singing. Forgive me for being crude, but I also think of the old saying, "I don't care which hand you masturbate with. It isn't my orgasm." If a person is most comfortable playing with a clip-on tuner on his or her headstock, or using a thumb to fret, who am I to make that person's playing experience less fun for him or her by being annoyed at how he or she makes himself or herself happy?

Didn't know that expression, but it sure made me laugh, and I have to agree with you...
Also think about the fact that you are lucky to have other people to play the ukulele with. In the city I live at, I know of no one else who plays the ukulele, and it's sometimes lonely to always play by yourself...

Kyle23
04-18-2014, 09:18 PM
I admit not liking the tuner thing lol. Only on youtube videos though where it's not doing any good at the moment.

I also don't like how some newer people think you have to have an expensive instrument. I don't see it much, but when I do it bothers me. I'd rather listen to a good player playing on a $50 instrument than a bad player on the best uke ever built.

Phluffy the Destroyer
04-18-2014, 10:54 PM
These are my pet peeves:

Chunking - I think a lot of people really over do the chunking. After about the 3rd time in a row I'm kind of over it, so when people chunk in a song from start to finish it just makes me want to beat their head against a wall.

Songs with words sound incomplete to me without them. I can't stand listening to Jake Shimabukuro or other ukulele players that don't sing when they do a cover. I really don't care how pretty it might sound, it just sounds like half a song to me... I also get a little irritated when people play so loud that I can't hear their singing. If a song is actually supposed to be an instrumental, I really appreciate all the flourishes and fiddley bits though.

On a similar note; I really get tired of all the talk about "advanced" ukulele... "Advanced ukulele" seems to be some sort of code for "I can't sing and play at the same time." Which brings me to my biggest pet peeve... There are more "advanced" techniques than just fingerpicking, although it seems many people don't appear to realize that. Not surprisingly, those "advanced" techniques are awesome for people who CAN play and sing at the same time... I play with people and see videos posted all the time by folks who probably should have spent more time advancing their rhythm and chord melody skills before moving on to the "I can't sing while I play" techniques.

DownUpDave
04-18-2014, 11:50 PM
My pet peeve is people that have pete peeves..................ooops I guess that includes me :D

I am by nature a tolerant person and as long as someone is having fun and not hurting others who am I to pass judgement on them. In a more blunt manner " either put up or shut up". Life is too short and none of us are making it out alive so ligthen up, don't worry be happy.

I was worried that my shoes were not very neat till I came upon a man who had no feet. I am just extremely grateful myself and others can enjoy our time here.

Mattyukaholic
04-18-2014, 11:56 PM
:agree:

I quite enjoyed posting my peeve on this thread but the more I've read through all the replies the more sad I have become. Sorry to sound like a wet blanket, but I'm guilty of at least one of these peeves and it makes me feel sad that something I do really irritates people.

It's fun to share peeves but at the same time we should be a bit more tolerant. If we went through life telling everyone what irritated us about them I'd imagine we wouldn't live long!

CeeJay
04-19-2014, 01:02 AM
My only pet peeve is if people aren't enjoying it and getting into it. "To play a wrong note is insignificant; to play without passion is inexcusable." Ludwig van Beethoven

I also find it unfortunate when someone on here is rude or inconsiderate when a post is made by a less experienced player, or by anyone for that matter. There are so many supportive, uplifting and encouraging people on this forum, it really sticks out like a sore thumb when someone loses that ohana spirit.

I recently lost my Mahalo spirit...I put it down on the floor and then stood on the little bugger........RIP little "Les Paul Cutaway" Buddy...now my Ohana
is going on a stand !!!!

kkimura
04-19-2014, 01:52 AM
As a uke newbie I am guilty of inciting all of the listed pet peeves except the use of a pick.
I am also lucky to be playing with a great uke club that gracefully allows me space to make mistakes and learn, no better way to learn than playing in a group IMHO, and provide positive feed back in the most supportive manner.
So, noticing things that aren't quite right and providing feed back is in the ohana spirit when done the right way.

hoosierhiver
04-19-2014, 03:45 AM
I assumed this was a fun thread and not to be taken too seriously people.

mailman
04-19-2014, 04:02 AM
I assumed this was a fun thread and not to be taken too seriously people.

:agree::agree:

Mattyukaholic
04-19-2014, 04:37 AM
I assumed this was a fun thread and not to be taken too seriously people.

Is that your peeve Mike?! ;) You're right though.

hobblecreek
04-19-2014, 04:57 AM
I assumed this was a fun thread and not to be taken too seriously people.
Yes, it seems that lots of folks get caught up in the thick of thin things . . .

chuck in ny
04-19-2014, 05:51 AM
if you need rhythm and timing help,, not mentioning any names,, get it and practice before appearing in public.

Leigh Coates
04-19-2014, 06:18 AM
My favourite quote:

"My friends, love is better than anger.
Hope is better than fear.
Optimism is better than despair.
So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic.
And we’ll change the world.

All my very best,

Jack Layton"
August 20, 2011

Littlegman
04-19-2014, 06:20 AM
I don't know if I'd call it a peeve, but it is certainly something that makes me feel unsettled: "Luthiers" who absolutely can't play a lick!

Another unsettling moment: watching Aldrine go from booth to booth at NAMM and hearing the various reps strum an uke of theirs that is out of tune!!

stevepetergal
04-19-2014, 06:38 AM
Tuning onstage

Leaving an instrument out of tune.

NOTLguy
04-19-2014, 06:46 AM
My pet peeve is going into a music store and finding the ukuleles are not tuned. Great marketing.

Bill

dirtiestkidever
04-19-2014, 06:50 AM
To me, pet peeve implies that you harbor a minor dislike like something for totally irrational and superficial reasons. The below two items fall into that category.

#1 Tuner on the headstock.

#2 sopranos with geared tuners (of the stick out variety).

How much do they bother me? Very very little.

Fun thread though.

Cheers.

Mattyukaholic
04-19-2014, 07:15 AM
My pet peeve is going into a music store and finding the ukuleles are not tuned. Great marketing.

Bill

There's a shop over here in Cardiff where the guitars are kept in tune and great condition but the ukes are left untuned and covered in dust. I played a Koolau there that had obviously been sat there ages, with dust all around the bridge etc and uncared for. The frets had lifted out of the dry fretboard. It was so sad.

PereBourik
04-19-2014, 07:20 AM
How hard is it to pinch the spring and slip a tuner into your case or a pocket? Really?

My 'ukulele are pretty; so are yours. My tuners are not.

Unless I want someone to see I plumped $70 for a Stroboclip. But I'm not that kind of playa.

Rick Turner
04-19-2014, 08:52 AM
I would suggest that we all might do better practicing and playing more and worrying less about musically irrelevant things that others do.

To that aim, I do have a peeve...shared by the luthiers who work for me, and that is seeing our instruments come in for adjustments looking as though they are hardly played. Give me an honest ding or scratch any day of the week rather than a three or five or seven year old instrument that looks un-played. Yes, we make expensive instruments; they're made to be played and played soft, hard and everything in between. Don't be afraid of using your ukes for what they were made for...playing joyfully and with a certain degree of abandon. That doesn't mean abuse is OK, but come on now, it's a tool for the making of music, not some sort of precious art object. I actually love the little signs of wear on my own main player instrument; I'm even kind of proud of fret wear. Sure, it's no big deal for me to fix it, but I know how much I've had to play thing thing to actually wear down metal frets with nylon strings. I don't have a "keep it at home" uke...if it's good enough for me on any level, it's good enough to take anywhere. Use 'em, don't abuse 'em, but don't be afraid of 'em.

hawaii 50
04-19-2014, 09:03 AM
Right on Rick!!!! :)

savagehenry
04-19-2014, 09:40 AM
Another one is when people name their ukuleles or use the same type of strings on all of their ukuleles, just doesn't make any sense to me.

chuck in ny
04-19-2014, 09:46 AM
exactly rick. i won't go ultra fancy on a rifle stock, ain't fittin', my guns are all made to be shot. i take loving care of everything but am not anal about objects acquiring wear.
whilst on this subject i would as soon have a normal cute/handsome grain of wood than one with psychedelic flame and shimmer. while the look is quite beautiful it doesn't equate to vastly superior sound. same reasoning really. it's fine though for those who like it and are willing to pay extra.

BlackBearUkes
04-19-2014, 09:50 AM
This has nothing to do with playing in jams, etc., but sometimes we luthiers get asked to consign our work in music stores. What happens with consignments is that the store uses your instrument to sell their instruments because they have no money in it. So now, I simply ask that they buy it outright at a whole sale price and most of the time I get this, "Oh, we don't do that". I then ask how many instruments on the walls are consigned other then mine, Its "well we have a contract, so we have to buy them". I don't so stores any more.

There is also the celebrity uke player that what one of your fine ukes for free so they can help you get your name out there so you can sell more. Right! I don't do celebrities either.

Rick Turner
04-19-2014, 10:07 AM
I have a pretty valid reason for playing out with a spectacularly flamed koa uke...

I'm a professional luthier, and a tastefully flashy uke helps me sell ukes. Yeah, it sounds good, too, but folks are always attracted to "shiny things"...and then they'll play and listen.

And as per the comment on luthiers who don't play...I don't get it, either. I think I need to be able to show what my instruments can do, for one thing, and then there's the fact that I've been a player as long as I've been working on instruments...and that's over 50 years now...well over. I don't see how one can evaluate tone and playability without playing decently. The best luthiers I know are players.

stringy
04-19-2014, 10:13 AM
exactly rick. i won't go ultra fancy on a rifle stock, ain't fittin', my guns are all made to be shot. i take loving care of everything but am not anal about objects acquiring wear.
whilst on this subject i would as soon have a normal cute/handsome grain of wood than one with psychedelic flame and shimmer. while the look is quite beautiful it doesn't equate to vastly superior sound. same reasoning really. it's fine though for those who like it and are willing to pay extra.


Exactly! I have yet to hear one of the 'works of art' sound better than my Plain Jane. When I can see my reflection in the gloss and bling I know the line has been crossed for me. That is just not what I am looking or playing for.

janeray1940
04-19-2014, 10:14 AM
Another one is when people name their ukuleles or use the same type of strings on all of their ukuleles, just doesn't make any sense to me.

The former makes no sense to me - I don't care if people do it, but if you do, don't expect me to remember the name of your uke (when I can barely remember *your* name!) :)

The latter - pretty much guilty as charged, but not for lack of trying different types of strings. All but one of my ukes are Kamakas and all of them get the same kind of strings, and to me this makes sense that since they are all the same wood and all from the same builder, after lots of trial and error I've become partial to one type of strings on all of them.

Dan Uke
04-19-2014, 10:15 AM
If you ever make a song book for 2 ukes, I would definitely buy it since you play jazz music!!


I have a pretty valid reason for playing out with a spectacularly flamed koa uke...

I'm a professional luthier, and a tastefully flashy uke helps me sell ukes. Yeah, it sounds good, too, but folks are always attracted to "shiny things"...and then they'll play and listen.

And as per the comment on luthiers who don't play...I don't get it, either. I think I need to be able to show what my instruments can do, for one thing, and then there's the fact that I've been a player as long as I've been working on instruments...and that's over 50 years now...well over. I don't see how one can evaluate tone and playability without playing decently. The best luthiers I know are players.

NewKid
04-19-2014, 10:31 AM
People who can't play a single song without looking at a chord chart. C'mon man, Harry Nilsson's "Coconut" is C7 all the way through! You put the lime in the coconut and drink them both up!

stringy
04-19-2014, 10:33 AM
Okay, I read all the posts and came to this conclusion:

My pet peeve is someone entertaining on stage that doesn't sing, with a blingy, shiny, uke named "Princess" playing with a pick and a tuner clipped to the headstock, and uncut, snarled coils of strings flapping in the breeze :) :) :)

Icelander53
04-19-2014, 10:34 AM
"
People who can't play a single song without looking at a chord chart. C'mon man, Harry Nilsson's "Coconut" is C7 all the way through! You put the lime in the coconut and drink them both up!"


Beginners are your pet peeve?

NewKid
04-19-2014, 10:38 AM
Yes, beginners are my pet peeve. Especially at the Bay View senior center where I teach 80 year-olds ukulele. I'm like, "C'mon ladies, C7 is a one-finger chord!"

Actually, I was referring to people in my uke group with huge binders of song sheets and no songs memorized. There is nothing at all wrong with this since this is how they enjoy playing.

vanflynn
04-19-2014, 11:10 AM
Strum patterns that never vary through out the song (especially up, down, up, down). It's more of a guideline than a rule.

I know that this is tough in groups but when you're playing with - oops- by yourself let the song dictate the rhythm

kwall
04-19-2014, 11:27 AM
Another one is when people name their ukuleles or use the same type of strings on all of their ukuleles, just doesn't make any sense to me.


to the first one... woops sorry.

i think i name them cause i get attached and feel as though they have a personality. I'm never expecting you to know the names or anything just more of a personal connection with my instruments. I get it from my dad... who names all his cars.

Rick Turner
04-19-2014, 12:05 PM
For "Lime in the Coconut", just have them tune their "A" string up a half step. Then they're in C7 open tuning and they don't need no stinkin' fretting fingers! Make 'em play it for an hour...

ksiegel
04-19-2014, 12:32 PM
I have one major pet peeve - it is something I do.

When playing solo - especially in front of people - I have noticed that I tend to speed up throughout the song. Not so much when I'm playing at home, until the camera gets turned on, but in front of an audience? I think I do it almost every time. (I don't know for sure, though.)

And I think it is a Performance Anxiety thing.

That said, I did John Prine's "Paradise" at an open mic the other night, in front of an audience comprised mostly of people who have been performing in public (and for money) for a lot longer than I've played an instrument. I didn't speed up, I didn't slow down, and when I did the final chorus a capella, I kept on pitch. I was damned proud of myself!



-Kurt

haole
04-19-2014, 01:37 PM
When people show up to a group jam and interrupt an easy three-chord song because they don't know how to play G7 or Dm or other very common chords. This is excusable for complete beginners, but it gets a little exhausting when it's the same people week after week and the group jam turns into a lesson for a couple of people who didn't feel like practicing. Bonus points if they show up with the most expensive uke in the room and spend half the time just talking about it.

Mxyzptik
04-19-2014, 03:44 PM
I have one major pet peeve - it is something I do.

When playing solo - especially in front of people - I have noticed that I tend to speed up throughout the song. Not so much when I'm playing at home, until the camera gets turned on, but in front of an audience? I think I do it almost every time. (I don't know for sure, though.

And I think it is a Performance Anxiety thing.

That said, I did John Prine's "Paradise" at an open mic the other night, in front of an audience comprised mostly of people who have been performing in public (and for money) for a lot longer than I've played an instrument. I didn't speed up, I didn't slow down, and when I did the final chorus a capella, I kept on pitch. I was damned proud of myself!



-Kurt

I write this across the top of all my piano music in bold letters.

" It's not a race ! "

It's not as big a problem on my Ukulele as it is on the piano but I am improving.

Mxyzptik
04-19-2014, 03:51 PM
I would suggest that we all might do better practicing and playing more and worrying less about musically irrelevant things that others do.

To that aim, I do have a peeve...shared by the luthiers who work for me, and that is seeing our instruments come in for adjustments looking as though they are hardly played. Give me an honest ding or scratch any day of the week rather than a three or five or seven year old instrument that looks un-played. Yes, we make expensive instruments; they're made to be played and played soft, hard and everything in between. Don't be afraid of using your ukes for what they were made for...playing joyfully and with a certain degree of abandon. That doesn't mean abuse is OK, but come on now, it's a tool for the making of music, not some sort of precious art object. I actually love the little signs of wear on my own main player instrument; I'm even kind of proud of fret wear. Sure, it's no big deal for me to fix it, but I know how much I've had to play thing thing to actually wear down metal frets with nylon strings. I don't have a "keep it at home" uke...if it's good enough for me on any level, it's good enough to take anywhere. Use 'em, don't abuse 'em, but don't be afraid of 'em.

Early this morning I set up with a coffee to play for a while. I took my good cloth out to rub the finger prints off my Ukulele and I have scratched the top up with strum marks a fair bit , what can I say, sometimes I'm enthusiastic.

I decided that if I wear a big hole in the top like Willie Nelson has to his guitar, that would only mean that I've had a awful lot of enjoyment playing it. Hearing it from you Rick confirms it !

Strumdaddy
04-19-2014, 04:47 PM
"I would suggest that we all might do better practicing and playing more and worrying less about musically irrelevant things that others do." - Rick Turner

Yes.Right on Rick!!!
This relates to a "peeve" I had about ME - although I thought it was about others, and all the sublime ukes out there that I really coveted. I imagined their lucky owners were keeping them untouched in humidified vaults. If only I had them....
Well, I did get a beautiful instrument - and I locked away for ages.
I saw myself doing just what annoyed me in others, so I started playing it, and it suffered some dings... It was actually liberating! I don't worry so much about it now (though I m still careful). I play it all the time, and appreciate it immensely. That's why I got it in the first place.
We must be careful throwing stones (I usually ask myself "why does that annoy me so much")
And thanks Rick for the builders perspective on making beautiful instruments that are to be used.

OldePhart
04-19-2014, 05:15 PM
When playing solo - especially in front of people - I have noticed that I tend to speed up throughout the song. Not so much when I'm playing at home, until the camera gets turned on, but in front of an audience? I think I do it almost every time. (I don't know for sure, though.)


I have to watch that myself, though since I've been playing bass for a while it's not as much of a problem as it once was.

Years ago though I used to play guitar for my wife when she sang. While we were rehearsing she would constantly be telling me to slow down because she couldn't keep up, didn't have time to breathe, etc. A lot of the songs we were doing were fairly fast southern gospel and we'd practice and practice and I'd feel like we were dragging every song we did but I'd throttle myself back to her speed. Then, we'd perform in public and she'd be off to the races so fast I could barely keep up with the chord changes! It never failed.

John

Phluffy the Destroyer
04-19-2014, 05:17 PM
I have one major pet peeve - it is something I do.

When playing solo - especially in front of people - I have noticed that I tend to speed up throughout the song. Not so much when I'm playing at home, until the camera gets turned on, but in front of an audience? I think I do it almost every time. (I don't know for sure, though.)

And I think it is a Performance Anxiety thing.

That said, I did John Prine's "Paradise" at an open mic the other night, in front of an audience comprised mostly of people who have been performing in public (and for money) for a lot longer than I've played an instrument. I didn't speed up, I didn't slow down, and when I did the final chorus a capella, I kept on pitch. I was damned proud of myself!



-Kurt

Just because it sort of goes hand in hand with this thread...

Many electronic tuners have a metronome function. If you turn it on and put it on the head stock, you can use it to help keep time. When you get over your performance anxiety, you can turn the little flashing light on your tuner around to face the camera while you play. :p

Wicked
04-19-2014, 05:41 PM
To that aim, I do have a peeve...shared by the luthiers who work for me, and that is seeing our instruments come in for adjustments looking as though they are hardly played.

Ding... Ding... Ding
We have a winner!

It's a damned wooden box with strings. Play the hell out of it - any way you please.

hammer40
04-19-2014, 11:45 PM
I would suggest that we all might do better practicing and playing more and worrying less about musically irrelevant things that others do.

To that aim, I do have a peeve...shared by the luthiers who work for me, and that is seeing our instruments come in for adjustments looking as though they are hardly played. Give me an honest ding or scratch any day of the week rather than a three or five or seven year old instrument that looks un-played. Yes, we make expensive instruments; they're made to be played and played soft, hard and everything in between. Don't be afraid of using your ukes for what they were made for...playing joyfully and with a certain degree of abandon. That doesn't mean abuse is OK, but come on now, it's a tool for the making of music, not some sort of precious art object. I actually love the little signs of wear on my own main player instrument; I'm even kind of proud of fret wear. Sure, it's no big deal for me to fix it, but I know how much I've had to play thing thing to actually wear down metal frets with nylon strings. I don't have a "keep it at home" uke...if it's good enough for me on any level, it's good enough to take anywhere. Use 'em, don't abuse 'em, but don't be afraid of 'em.

Sorry Rick, you would be be disappointed if you saw my CR tenor. While I play or practice something on it just about everyday, it's still is in mint condition, no strum marks. I guess I just have a light touch since all my ukes are that way right now, but then I don't really attack when I strum or do any "chunking" style strums. I can see where that style would mark it up pretty good and pretty quickly. I think as I progress though, I'm sure it will suffer some combat damage.

Uncle Leroy
04-20-2014, 02:25 AM
low G fanatics...usually former guitar players.

Take it easy on the guys coming to the uke from guitar. A low G just kinda makes sense to some of us. I say if it makes you happy it doesn't matter how you get it done.

KnowsPickin
04-20-2014, 04:38 AM
Overall, I'm not too picky. But one thing that bugs me is when someone is playing a nice regular rhythm to accompany themselves singing and then they either drop a beat or add one. This usually happens at the end of a line or verse. It breaks the rhythimic flow and sets me on edge. If they must create a break, please add an entire bar, not just a single beat.

bobinde
04-20-2014, 07:29 AM
I just finished reading this thread. And I've come to the conclusion that any Pet Peeve I have about others is usually something I catch myself doing.

A lesson in Humility, I guess . . .

bobinde

Lumpy Wafflesquirt
04-20-2014, 11:22 AM
I was worried that my shoes were not very neat till I came upon a man who had no feet.

sounds like that ought to be a song, If I were a writer I would write it.

stevepetergal
04-21-2014, 03:52 AM
banjo ukes (did I say that out loud?)

stevepetergal
04-21-2014, 03:59 AM
People who refer to the first string (A) as the "bottom" string. No, that's the "top" string.

"The uke is tuned like the bottom four strings of the guitar with a capo at the fifth fret." No, it's tuned like the top four strings of the guitar capo'd at the fifth fret. :rolleyes:

Urgh! Drives me nuts and so many people do it that it perpetuates the wrong nomenclature because, hey, "I read it on UU from someone who's been playing longer than me so it must be true."

Hmm... I get it but.... with re-entrant tuning, is the G the bottom string? Is "high and low" the same as "top and bottom"? Just asking.

When "up-strumming", which way am I supposed go? I think I've been playing up-side-down from the very beginning! Back to the drawing board.

My pet peeve: Old people who use phrases like "Back to the drawing board" or "Come to think of it"

Come to think of it, is it the top of the ukulele, or is it the front? Is the head at the top or at the end? The sides! (oh no) They go all the way around!!! I'm going back to the piano. At least I know where the frets are.

Roselynne
04-30-2014, 01:19 AM
I have to admit I have a thing about tuners on headstocks. Sure, I get the need to have them in a loud bar or other venue. I'm "fortunate" enough to only ever play in small, intimate places - coffee shops, classrooms, nursing homes - where it's a non-issue. Seriously though, why do you need a tuner clipped on when you're recording a song for youtube in the comfort of your own home?

But that's gravy. My real pet peeve is people who leave the toilet seat up. You know who you are.

Tuner sometimes needs to stay put, in a place where it won't get lost ... even in a small, intimate, but public setting. Headstock may be the best choice. I wouldn't (and don't) leave it on at home, however.

ichadwick
04-30-2014, 03:22 AM
Boy are some people cranky for aficionados of an instrument that's supposed to bring joy into our lives.



#1. Fretting the strings with the thumb.

#2. Playing the ukulele with a guitar pick. If you want to play a guitar, well, go get a guitar.

#3. Folks hanging a uke strap around their neck like a camera strap, with both sides coming over their collar bones.


All three of which I do at times. Many times, actually. Maybe even most of the time.

1. It's a technique probably used since guitars were invented. I learned to use all of my digits on the fretboard from some very good players and watching some old blue masters on video. To me, that's like saying you shouldn't fingerpick with your thumb or your pinky. Why not use what you were born with? And I can deaden or release the 4th string much more easily with a thumb than with some barre chords.

2. Now I'm not a fan of the fat felt picks, myself, because I find them sloppy, but I carry some thin nylon picks in my pocket all the time. Picks are used with most stringed instruments for reasons of style, technique and sound. Bouzouki, oud, balalaika, guitar, mandolin, banjo... why NOT use a pick if you like they way if feels or it creates music? I use a pick almost exclusively with my steel-stringed ukes and find it hard to get that edgy, bluesy sound from them with my fingers alone. better attack with a pick. And sorry to pass this along, but a uke and a guitar: kissing cousins.

3. I have several ukes with two strap buttons. I often use light fabric guitar straps on them, or a thinner strap like the Uke Leash. Why shouldn't it go around my neck? That way the instrument has no chance of falling. It also gives my arms and hands greater mobility: thus I can make music better. Hang it on one shoulder? Too easy to have it slip off (especially when I'm standing in front of our uke group trying to point to the screen with one hand while chording my uke with the other). A uke "thong"? Don't want to dampen the topwood thus deaden the sound. Besides, they don't work very well and can off-balance an instrument. Worrying about how people wear a strap is like worrying about how they knot their tie.

And for some of the rest...

4. Tuners on headstocks or lit while performing? I pay attention to the music and the musician, not the accessories. It's like worrying whether their socks match.

5. Low G versus high G? This reminds me of the old Apple-versus-PC arguments. Some music works best with one or the other. Use what sounds best for you and don't fret about what others are using. I have ukes strung both ways (and baritones high- and low-D). What matters is that you play, that you make music. Oh yeah, and do give both tunings a try, just to be sure you understand why one works for any song.

6. Instruments looking unused? What, you can't be an avid player unless your instrument looks crappy? Not every instrument has to look like Willie Nelson's guitars to prove it's been played. Maybe it's a sign of abuse rather than good use. I keep mine looking reasonably good (okay, maybe not dusted as often as I should). No egregious scratches, strum marks, finish wear. I have a few matte finishes with shiny spots where I anchor my fingertips for some picking styles, but that's about it. Maybe someone should sell fake-abused ukes like they sell fake-abused guitars?

My biggest peeves with other ukulele players are.... nothing. Absolutely nothing. You play as the music moves you. You play how it feels, sounds and works best for you. In fact, you do something I have never done or tried, and I will attempt it myself, just to see if it works for me. From rank beginner to accomplished performer: everything you do is fine by me.

Okay, maybe just one: other musicians who don't think a ukulele is a real, serious and expressive instrument. But that's not a peeve with uke players.

Ukejenny
04-30-2014, 01:55 PM
Okay, I read all the posts and came to this conclusion:

My pet peeve is someone entertaining on stage that doesn't sing, with a blingy, shiny, uke named "Princess" playing with a pick and a tuner clipped to the headstock, and uncut, snarled coils of strings flapping in the breeze :) :) :)

Uke sounds out of tune even though a tuner is permanently affixed to the head plate...

peaceweaver3
04-30-2014, 04:52 PM
low G fanatics...usually former guitar players.

*Raises hand* That's me, low G fanatic. Uh, I mean I play 99% and compose 100% on a low G uke. And no one could ever call me a guitar player, at least not with a straight face. :o But that's my personal playing. I do love to hear reentrant ukes. My first love - I mean uke - was one. I just found this post funny.

And I have no pets and no peeves worth mentioning. It takes all kinds after all.

Down Up Dick
04-30-2014, 06:33 PM
Wow! I don't play in public, and now I'm glad of it. I've been looking for a group, but I'd probably break most of your rules most of the time. They'd probably kick me out or ban me or come after me with pitch forks and torches. Sanctuary! Sanctuary! I guess I'll just strum away in my bathroom where there's a nice stool to sit on. There's a slight echo too that's pleasant, and no one throws anything at me.

Booli
04-30-2014, 09:34 PM
1) if you're gonna make a video, tune the instrument first, and then PLEASE check it and tune it again before you hit record. If it sounds way off, after the second measure, I just do not care any more. An out-of-tune uke, droning on for 3 minutes is akin to chinese water torture for me

2) 'for sale' listings in the marketplace from brand new forum members with less than 2-3 posts, which usually do NOT include the little note that has the date and says UU in one of the photos - it tells me that they either did not READ the rules, or do not care about the rules - and gives me zero confidence in the transaction completing happily. I will avoid such items for sale, despite the price being a 'bargain', every time. let's just say "lessons learned"...

greenie44
05-01-2014, 02:12 AM
I saw Bruce Springsteen last week and all of Tom Morello's guitars had excessive stringage pointing above the tuners - although they seemed to be clipped to be the same length. I could have sworn he had a tuner on the head of some of them, even though he was getting a different instrument from the techs pretty much every song.

dhunter
06-02-2015, 10:03 AM
My pet peeve is going into a music store and finding the ukuleles are not tuned. Great marketing.

Bill

me too! And I hate it when I leave the house 'unuked'. I feel like I'm incomplete or slightly undressed without bringing at least three ukes along with me: two to share and one to play myself, just in case a musical opportunity appears.

Icelander53
06-02-2015, 11:10 AM
My pet peeve has nothing directly to do with the ukulele. My pet peeve is humanity in general. I say replace them with dogs.

Debby
06-02-2015, 11:35 AM
I have more pet peeves regarding playing the piano, than I do with the guitar and ukulele.

tbeltrans
06-02-2015, 11:37 AM
Life is too short - forget the "pet peeves". Unless somebody is forcing you to do something on the ukulele, piano, or whatever that you don't want to do, fahgeddaboutit!

Could you please had me that piano over there....BAM!...thanks! :)

Tony

andylama
06-02-2015, 12:41 PM
My pet peeve is, ironically, purism itself.

Not joking.

Adrian Ortiga
06-02-2015, 07:42 PM
Not cutting the excess string off

igorthebarbarian
06-02-2015, 08:18 PM
Not cutting the excess strings off at the headstock reminds me of those people who grow their fingernails out ridiculously long. That always creeped me out. So my brain somehow associates that with that.

NewKid
06-02-2015, 09:09 PM
Imprisoning expensive ukuleles at home. They want to see the world and share their beautiful voices with everyone!

Hippie Dribble
06-02-2015, 09:49 PM
This is a very instructive topic. Read through the list of peeves pre-resurection and even read the post resurection peeves. Then see how many you can get done in one day, especially all the peeves about being in tune and inane musical technicalities. Purposely leave the tag ends of the strings long or in loops, keep your tuner clipped on at all times, learn how to bend the strings you fret so you know you are out of tune when you want to be, etc.
Anyone who cares about peeves when doing stuff involving ukuleles is missing the point. Help them by making the point.
^ Why yours are always my favourite posts Bill. Thanks.

However, both the pre and post resurrection states were grounded in fear I believe. The former because Jesus had been killed and his disciples couldn't imagine continuing without him, and the latter because those responsible for his crucifixion feared he had risen and the consequences that might ensue. You roll the stone away. You' don't. You just can't win sometimes. I'll get my coat...

Tootler
06-02-2015, 10:42 PM
Pet peeves:

Intolerance
Thou shalt...
Thou shalt not...
Too much :rulez:

CeeJay
06-02-2015, 11:21 PM
Pet peeves:

Intolerance
Thou shalt...
Thou shalt not...
Too much :rulez:

Yeah..................and Theory...............

ukulelekarcsi
06-03-2015, 02:27 AM
Ukuleles left on chairs. That automatically makes me tense, aching to put them in a safer spot.

And another one, which I inflict on others a lot, is starting a song and breaking it off after the first verse and perhaps a bit of the refrain - very annoying. Housemates cringe.

For the rest I think I'm quite tolerant towards slapping stickers on ukuleles, leaving tuners on, sloppy string ends, odd looking fretting gestures, clumsy rhythms.

As for luthiers who can't play (most of them can), I know that Leo Fender couldn't fret a simple chord to save his life. Last Saturday a fine violin maker confessed on radio that he couldn't play a musical piece, but he did know how to make different sounds on his instruments - like a car mechanic who can test, but doesn't have the skills of a trained race driver. Luthiers all are very good listeners, though.

Salespeople who pretend to know a lot about the ukulele but actually don't ('We don't have ukulele strings, but you can use this mandolin set and just retune it'), that could be a pet peeve, but they are annoying in all walks of life, not only in the field of ukuleles.

Adrian Ortiga
06-03-2015, 04:19 AM
I feel you, You dont gotta grow 3 inch long nails to get a decent sound hahaha

Icelander53
06-03-2015, 07:21 AM
this thread is really good for a laugh. Lots of replies by people claiming not to have pet peeves. lol

itsme
06-03-2015, 08:01 AM
Okay, I'll add another one...

People who insist on referring to chord/lyric sheets as "tabs."

Rllink
06-03-2015, 08:36 AM
I wonder why it is that people don't like the electric tuners left on the uke? Of all the things that could bother someone, that one seems so insignificant.

Icelander53
06-03-2015, 08:49 AM
I've seen the pros do it/

Tootler
06-03-2015, 10:21 AM
I wonder why it is that people don't like the electric tuners left on the uke? Of all the things that could bother someone, that one seems so insignificant.

It doesn't bother me. Maybe because I do exactly that. I know where they are and they're to hand when I need one. I use the planet waves mini tuners as they are small and not too obvious.

Oh.... and they work well .... except on my banjo uke as I found out last weekend.

tbeltrans
06-03-2015, 11:20 AM
this thread is really good for a laugh. Lots of replies by people claiming not to have pet peeves. lol

I suspect all of us have "pet peeves" of one kind or another, but some things are just not worth getting excited about. The ukulele is a fun instrument and pet peeves about it make it not fun anymore.

Just curious...has anybody here named a pet (dog, cat, fish, bird, ??) "peeve"?

Tony

bunnyf
06-04-2015, 12:58 AM
Fretting the strings with the thumb. I know it works for some folks. I guess maybe it's easier in some circumstances. But it bugs me.
:D

Was scanning thru some YouTube videos for my uke group and saw Eric Clapton doing this. (I know everyone points to Richie Havens for this). I WISH I could make better use of my thumb. I have trouble keeping it put securely on the back of the neck.
What other folks do really doesn't bother me but I am curious as to why people spend a fair amount of time changing strings and wouldn't take a sec longer to clip the ends at the headstock. Sometimes they are so long it just seems like a safety hazard, you could poke someone. Doesn't bother me though, I just won't go too close, but it does seem strange. I, personally, like them neat, but then if I'm gonna change strings, I want them wound just so and at the bridge I want every end tucked up and looking good. Besides, I hate getting poked on the inside of my strumming forearm with sticking up ends.
My only real pet peeve (and this is just a matter of rudeness) is when folks tune loudly, while another musician is playing at guitar circles.

Pukulele Pete
06-04-2015, 01:30 AM
I don't like the unclipped strings at the headstock , ESPECIALLY on guitars. If you've been stabbed in the hand by a steel string you know. Seeing them at eye level makes me cringe. One more is leaving an instrument in the case with the top closed and unlatched. I did this once many years ago to my favorite guitar , picked up the case and the guitar fell out. Ooow , luckily that hurt me more than the guitar.

Hippie Dribble
06-04-2015, 01:31 AM
Okay, I'll add another one...

People who insist on referring to chord/lyric sheets as "tabs."

Yep. Have to agree with this one.

earljam
06-04-2015, 02:17 AM
People who refer to the first string (A) as the "bottom" string. No, that's the "top" string.

"The uke is tuned like the bottom four strings of the guitar with a capo at the fifth fret." No, it's tuned like the top four strings of the guitar capo'd at the fifth fret. :rolleyes:

Urgh! Drives me nuts and so many people do it that it perpetuates the wrong nomenclature because, hey, "I read it on UU from someone who's been playing longer than me so it must be true."

It bugs me when people say "top" or "bottom" instead of "high" or "low".

Hippie Dribble
06-04-2015, 02:25 AM
It bugs me when people say "top" or "bottom" instead of "high" or "low".

Fair enough, but on a standard uke tuned re-entrant G, neither the top nor the bottom string are "low"; in fact they're the two highest pitches of the four...
so you sorta have to refer to the 'A' and "G" as 'top' and "bottom" because the lowest strings are the middle two. Whew...I need a brandy :p

earljam
06-04-2015, 02:30 AM
Finally thought of something - people who, when they find I play ukulele, ask if I know Tiptoe Through The Tulips. No offense, Mr. Tim.

What you should do is get Jumpin' Jim's book. Has a killer version of TTTT you could proceed to wow them with.

ukulelekarcsi
06-04-2015, 02:40 AM
In the same vein: I can't stand the 'gCEA' notation for re-entrant tuning. It's wrong in two ways.
- it suggests Helmholtz pitch notation (developped for labelling organ pipes) but isn't. Helmholtz uses upper case letter for lower octaves and lower case ones for higher notes, adding commas and quotation marks when moving away from the center. The ukulele is tuned in G4-C4-E4-A4, which in Helmholz is simply g'c'e'a'.
- anyway, for re-entrant tuning the g-pitch is in between the e and the a, so there's no need for it to be in a different notation than the other strings. Linear tuning does, because the g then falls in a different octave than the other ones.

wickedwahine11
06-04-2015, 01:02 PM
Okay, I'll add another one...

People who insist on referring to chord/lyric sheets as "tabs."

OMG this absolutely drives me up the wall. I hate it when I do a search for tabs of a song and get all excited after finding them - only to discover they are chord sheets. There is a special place in hell for people that do that.

CeeJay
06-04-2015, 01:24 PM
OMG this absolutely drives me up the wall. I hate it when I do a search for tabs of a song and get all excited after finding them - only to discover they are chord sheets. There is a special place in hell for people that do that.

I'll raise you ...those who refer to lyric /chord sheets as Chord "Charts".AGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG GGGGh.


Course it could just be I am intolerant .......

itsme
06-04-2015, 03:24 PM
I'll raise you ...those who refer to lyric /chord sheets as Chord "Charts".AGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG GGGGh.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_chart

CeeJay
06-04-2015, 03:54 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_chart

Yes .....and ? ....it doesn't mean that the term doesn't peeve me off ...............;)

peterbright
06-04-2015, 04:57 PM
Absolutely nothing...but I hope I am irritating you.

mds725
06-04-2015, 05:35 PM
I've heard that peeves don't make good pets.

Redeyejedi
06-04-2015, 06:04 PM
my pet peeve is when some chumpo steals your shades while your looking at ukulele.

if you know it ain't yours, don't touch; if you do know to whom it belongs, kindly return it.

consitter
06-04-2015, 06:25 PM
My biggest pet peeve?

CeeJay. :)

Nickie
06-05-2015, 04:40 PM
Incessant noodling when someone is talking. My wife does that. It's the only thing she does I don't like so I guess that's pretty good. The jam session leader hates it, and gives us the stink eye, so I nudge her under the table. She hates that.

NewKid
06-05-2015, 05:08 PM
Playing every song fast. What's the rush bro?

Tootler
06-06-2015, 07:26 AM
I'll raise you ...those who refer to lyric /chord sheets as Chord "Charts".AGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG GGGGh.


Course it could just be I am intolerant .......

CeeJay Intolerant? Surely not :rofl:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_chart


Yes .....and ? ....it doesn't mean that the term doesn't peeve me off ...............;)

"Chord Chart" does have the virtue of being more accurate than "Tab" for a Chord/Lyric sheet.