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BigD
05-12-2014, 01:31 PM
Is it just me or is there never an end to trying to find the perfect ukulele? I havent had nearly the exposure as some of you, most of you probably, but i just seem to be unhappy with my ukes recently. My go to uke, my cheap (not a bad thing) makala tenor is just not what it used to be in my ears. Itll always have a special place but i dont know if my ears have developed or what but its just not there anymore. I also just received a very nice solid koa tenor by trade from another member ( he was awesome to work with by the way, truly upheld the nature of this site) and im still not happy. Its a great uke, very bell like but still warm, looks fantastic. AND IM STILL NOT HAPPY!! it just doesnt feel right in my hands and i cant pinpoint it, to the point where ill more then likely post it for trade soon, which is a shame because its exactly the look i like. How many of you exchange ukes on a regular basis? How many of you have found " The One" and you could go without another your whole life? Im also not in any way rolling in the dough by any means so its hard to finance these kind of things but it truly bothers me till no end.

Icelander53
05-12-2014, 01:37 PM
I think I'd be fine with my Fluke for the rest of my days. Black, Tenor, wood Fretboard, Low G tuning. It has a beautiful sound and I've gotten used to the strange neck shape. I think though if it was to be my only uke I'd go to a reentrant tuning.

Olarte
05-12-2014, 01:39 PM
To me there is no such thing... I have 30+ and I love them all... Each one is perfect for a particular mood, moment, song etc...

In the end it's not about the instrument or you, but about the music. In the same manner as a painting there is no one perfect brush...

SailingUke
05-12-2014, 01:53 PM
To me there is no such thing... I have 30+ and I love them all... Each one is perfect for a particular mood, moment, song etc...

In the end it's not about the instrument or you, but about the music. In the same manner as a painting there is no one perfect brush...

I agree with Ivan, that there may well be NO perfect ukulele.
I have some that sound great, feel great and look great which are all part of the equation, but none of mine are perfect for every song and mood.
Part of the fun and the journey !!!!

sukie
05-12-2014, 02:01 PM
I seem to be one of very few people....I have found my ukulele. I in no way mean to be a snob -- really....but nothing plays as nice to ME as my Moore Bettah. And I only need one.
As for the cash part....I understand that. It took me months to pay my husband back for my ukulele. What I don't really understand, and it doesn't really bother me because it's not my money, is when people buy what I consider a lateral purchase. They don't upgrade in quality. And then they sometimes don't like that one either. I think all that money spent could be put towards one really good one. That's just me, though.

It did take me quite awhile to get used to my ukulele. My KoAloha neck was way different than the MB neck. I also went from a concert neck to a tenor neck. There is for sure an adjustment period on that.

I am in a minority though...take what I say with a grain of salt.

Jim Hanks
05-12-2014, 02:21 PM
it is a lot easier to buy another uke than it is to spend 30 minutes a day, every single day, for a year or more, doing stuff that will help you learn how to make most ukuleles sound good.
Maybe you could set yourself a goal that you wont buy another uke until you learn how to make the one you own now sound great.
Ouch. That hit me square between the eyes!

janeray1940
05-12-2014, 02:21 PM
I seem to be one of very few people....I have found my ukulele. I in no way mean to be a snob -- really....but nothing plays as nice to ME as my Moore Bettah. And I only need one.
As for the cash part....I understand that. It took me months to pay my husband back for my ukulele. What I don't really understand, and it doesn't really bother me because it's not my money, is when people buy what I consider a lateral purchase. They don't upgrade in quality. And then they sometimes don't like that one either. I think all that money spent could be put towards one really good one. That's just me, though.

It did take me quite awhile to get used to my ukulele. My KoAloha neck was way different than the MB neck. I also went from a concert neck to a tenor neck. There is for sure an adjustment period on that.

I am in a minority though...take what I say with a grain of salt.

I'm also a bit puzzled by the lateral-purchase mentality - personally I'd rather have one good uke than a dozen or more middling ones. That being said, though, I'll admit to having 4 good ukes :)

The thing that I've found is that my needs have changed since I started playing. If I played reentrant only, and solo only, I could easily limit myself to a single uke. But I do need both a reentrant and a low G, and lately I've been glad that I've got 2 of each since my main-player reentrant uke has been in the shop for over a month getting some kinks ironed out.

Pueo
05-12-2014, 02:38 PM
My experience was that I bought a "starter" ukulele first just to see if I wanted to keep going - $150 Lanikai, which I still have. I did reach a point where it just was not doing it for me anymore, and it did have some intonation problems. I bought my Koa Pono next, and I thought I would never need another ukulele. It was perfect! But then I thought that the tenor Ukulele was not really "uke-y" enough, sopranos were still too small for me, but I wanted to try a concert, so I got a nice concert. Then I wanted a six-string... That's pretty much how it goes for me. But each new ukulele was quite different from the last, either a different size, tone, function, style, etc.
I have played Sukie's ukulele. I think if I had Chuck Moore build an ukulele for me, that would likely be "it" and I would not need to buy another one, but I would still keep the ones I already have!

DaveY
05-12-2014, 02:43 PM
I understand that spending the same amount of money is a "lateral purchase" in terms of dollars, and I did find much more satisfaction in spending enough for a KoAloha. But if I hadn't liked the KoAloha, I might have made a "lateral purchase" of a Kanilea or another comparably priced uke, and been happy, because ukuleles can vary significantly at the same price point. But an "upward purchase" can make a difference -- if it's the right one.

Yukon Cornelius
05-12-2014, 02:45 PM
at one point I owned over 30 ukes. Most were cheap Chinese ones though I did own 4 KoAlohas, a couple of mainlands, three Meles and a Kamaka. Now I own way less and I am saving up for my last big purchase. I debate going with just one uke, but I doubt that will ever happen (I like the 6 string and the 8 string) as well as a low g tenor and a concert. So basically I only need 4 ukes.

However if I could only choose one ukulele it would be my KoAloha concert.


I do not understand lateral import purchases. Save that money.

NewKid
05-12-2014, 02:50 PM
Well, I've found "The Four". I love my current line-up of three tenors and a soprano - all quality hand-made instruments. They're all tuned re-entrant C but they each have unique sound and feel due to the design, wood combination, and different string sets. For me the search has ended, though I may have said that before. :)

I did spend a lot of time and money going through many fine ukuleles the last two years to get where I am today. But I'm glad I was able to do that because I learned a lot and it made me appreciate what I have now. I'm having much more fun playing music than searching for instruments these days. Ivan and Bill: right again.

Teek
05-12-2014, 07:49 PM
Let me butt in with my :2cents: Before you sell that koa uke down the river change the strings! Then give them at bare minimum two weeks of playing 30 minutes every day to settle them in. Go through some of the Uke Minutes on this site maybe. If you still don't like it try another set of strings. For koa I use Worth Clears or Southcoast mediums. Even fresh Aquilas are okay if you have some on hand. IF after two or three string changes and some daily practice time you don't have a different view then move it along.

I will not divulge how many ukes I bought prior to changing to fresh or different strings on ukes I already had, even if only 3-6 months on the strings (and OMG 1+ years on some ukes that mostly sat!) depending on play time, on ukes I wasn't happy with, which after a string swap and time to settle I wondered what the heck I was thinking... :p

It may give you time to figure out that even if strings don't help, you don't like the neck or the fret wire, or something else. Then you will be closer to zeroing in on what you do like.

The OTHER thing that makes a HUGE difference but which you may need help with is SETUP. If your strings are too high for your comfort it may never seem right. I have had my Kanile'a for 5 years and got it from MGM and it was supposed to be properly set up. I finally sat down with it and scoped it all out, did some serious adjustments and now I am finally pretty happy with it, except now I know I like a narrower neck and fretboard. Can't fault the sound or playability now one bit though.

Yukon Cornelius
05-12-2014, 07:58 PM
Let me butt in with my :2cents: Before you sell that koa uke down the river change the strings! Then give them at bare minimum two weeks of playing 30 minutes every day to settle them in. Go through some of the Uke Minutes on this site maybe. If you still don't like it try another set of strings. For koa I use Worth Clears or Southcoast mediums. Even fresh Aquilas are okay if you have some on hand. IF after two or three string changes and some daily practice time you don't have a different view then move it along.

I will not divulge how many ukes I bought prior to changing to fresh or different strings on ukes I already had, even if only 3-6 months on the strings (and OMG 1+ years on some ukes that mostly sat!) depending on play time, on ukes I wasn't happy with, which after a string swap and time to settle I wondered what the heck I was thinking... :p

It may give you time to figure out that even if strings don't help, you don't like the neck or the fret wire, or something else. Then you will be closer to zeroing in on what you do like.

The OTHER thing that makes a HUGE difference but which you may need help with is SETUP. If your strings are too high for your comfort it may never seem right. I have had my Kanile'a for 5 years and got it from MGM and it was supposed to be properly set up. I finally sat down with it and scoped it all out, did some serious adjustments and now I am finally pretty happy with it, except now I know I like a narrower neck and fretboard. Can't fault the sound or playability now one bit though.
Good
Advise here. I just sold a kala cedar top that I should have changed strings on first.
But I'd never have been happy with the kala. It was to deep.

ukantor
05-12-2014, 10:29 PM
At one time,I had a very bad case of UAS. I was always looking for the next "better" ukulele. I make ukes, as a hobby, and am very pleased with some of my own creations, but that didn't stop me wanting to buy others.

Over a period of about twelve years, I have come to the realisation that among the fourteen (or so) soprano ukes that I now own, I can always find one that satisfies my current mood. Perhaps I've just found the ideal number of ukes for me.

The most unlikely contender for the title of my favourite uke is a KoAlana. It is one of the very early KoAlanas which earned that brand such a bad name. It was given to me by a store who considered it to be unsaleable junk. It took me about three hours work to put it into playable condition. A close examination shows it to be really badly made and finished, but it plays well and sounds excellent. It would be one of the very last ukes I would part with.

Peterjens
05-12-2014, 11:00 PM
How many of you exchange ukes on a regular basis? How many of you have found " The One" and you could go without another your whole life?

I have never exchanged a 'ukulele for another. I have found "The Nine" (all sopranos) and can't buy anymore unless I get rid of one or get rid of my wife. I joke with the 'uke group that I am more of a collector than player. Now it's time to learn to play them.

Mattyukaholic
05-12-2014, 11:11 PM
For me it was all about finding the kind of ukulele that had that magical combination of sound and feel. I went through so many ukuleles to work it out. It doesn't mean I've stopped looking but I now know exactly what brands have that sound and feel I want (for me that's a thin neck and loud open sound - KoAlohas and Martin being my safe bets.)

peejay52
05-12-2014, 11:22 PM
Interesting thread..i am a complete novice and bought a 15 cheap one at first.....more like a toy..it was a soprano....I couldnt get my fingers on the strings properly so I bought a Kala tenor for 99 ..still cheap by most standards on here but I am comfortable with it.Maybe when i can play a decent tune all the way through my taste might change but I dont think I'll ever sell it

Icelander53
05-13-2014, 12:53 AM
Thinking on this, buying more than one uke and even buying laterally is very good prep for getting just what you want down the line in one or two ukes if that is your goal.

Ukejenny
05-13-2014, 08:11 AM
I have made three lateral purchases, because I wanted the different wood choices. For some reason, the different woods are important to me.

I don't buy and trade often. I have the same three, one of each size, that I've always had.

I have recently discovered that I am a concert girl. Love the sound and love the feel of it in my left hand, so I am thinking of getting a Blackbird Clara, because they have a big sound, are resonant with a good sustain and very tough and durable. I want to have a passive pickup installed in it. But, I will always have a reentrant and a low G uke. I like the different sounds.

I believe that there is a "the one" ukulele out there, for a person who wants to find "the one". I've played the same clarinet for almost 30 years and if I find the right ukulele, it will be the same.

gyosh
05-13-2014, 09:12 AM
I seem to be one of very few people....I have found my ukulele. I in no way mean to be a snob -- really....but nothing plays as nice to ME as my Moore Bettah. And I only need one.
As for the cash part....I understand that. It took me months to pay my husband back for my ukulele. What I don't really understand, and it doesn't really bother me because it's not my money, is when people buy what I consider a lateral purchase. They don't upgrade in quality. And then they sometimes don't like that one either. I think all that money spent could be put towards one really good one. That's just me, though.

It did take me quite awhile to get used to my ukulele. My KoAloha neck was way different than the MB neck. I also went from a concert neck to a tenor neck. There is for sure an adjustment period on that.

I am in a minority though...take what I say with a grain of salt.

I agree with you.

Mine is perfect for me as well. It was big bucks, but worth every penny and it probably saved me money in not purchasing a whole stable of ukes.

Oh, mine is a Compass Rose (adirondack spruce top / Cherry back and sides)

KnowsPickin
05-13-2014, 09:27 AM
Actually, there are lots of perfect ukuleles around. But they are only perfect in specific circumstances. Although some come close, no uke is truly perfect at everything. They are always best at something in particular. These may create conflicts.
1) A linear tuned instrument can do things a reentrant tuned uke can't. Chords sound different with some better one way or the other. Also reentrant sounds much better if you like claw hammer.
2) Do you prefer to play lead or chords? Fingerstyle or with a pick?
3) Some songs sound better with a smooth warm jazzy tone, others with a bright, zippy tone.
4) You probably don't want to take your $3000 custom uke out camping. Use the $100 laminate for that.
5) A soprano may cut through better for some situations, but a tenor is better for larger hands.
6) Some days you might just want to play a koa instead of a maple instrument. Aesthetics count too.

You see. This is just scratching the surface. Plus, ukes are often relatively inexpensive and occupy little real estate in the house. So making additions can be fairly painless, to a point. (But don't tell the wife :).) UAS is real and will always be there.

Good luck with your herd.

wickedwahine11
05-13-2014, 09:29 AM
Yeah, I do tend to be a fickle person by nature. I had a Kanilea, then wanted a Kamaka, then wanted a KoAloha, and so it goes. I have one or two ukes that are quite beautiful but are not my favorite to play (one just needs the action adjusted but I haven't gotten around to getting it done) and I have another that sounds great but is not quite as pretty to look at. I admit fully to being susceptible to eye candy.

I always felt a Moore Bettah was the perfect combination of sound and beauty. If I had one of those, it would be the one uke to rule them all. I am not sure if I would sell off all the others, or keep them. Maybe I would keep one (probably the KoAloha tenor) as a backup uke and sell the rest.

Otherwise though, my other ukes are always going to be great instruments, but not "the one." Hence, my UAS remains unabated.

SoCal Ukester 713
05-13-2014, 01:50 PM
First try changing the strings. Fresh strings, or a different brand, can make a big improvement.

Good tone is subjective. Maybe you're developing a preference for a different ukulele sound or feel. I don't think "The One" exists. It's about the one that inspires and delights you at this moment in your musical development.

CeeJay
05-13-2014, 02:43 PM
Is it just me or is there never an end to trying to find the perfect ukulele? I havent had nearly the exposure as some of you, most of you probably, but i just seem to be unhappy with my ukes recently. My go to uke, my cheap (not a bad thing) makala tenor is just not what it used to be in my ears. Itll always have a special place but i dont know if my ears have developed or what but its just not there anymore. I also just received a very nice solid koa tenor by trade from another member ( he was awesome to work with by the way, truly upheld the nature of this site) and im still not happy. Its a great uke, very bell like but still warm, looks fantastic. AND IM STILL NOT HAPPY!! it just doesnt feel right in my hands and i cant pinpoint it, to the point where ill more then likely post it for trade soon, which is a shame because its exactly the look i like. How many of you exchange ukes on a regular basis? How many of you have found " The One" and you could go without another your whole life? Im also not in any way rolling in the dough by any means so its hard to finance these kind of things but it truly bothers me till no end.

It's a sad fact of life ....like with guitars ...you don't choose ...the uke chooses you.....you will pick one up and it will just be ....and that's it.....

penn'orth.

haole
05-13-2014, 03:10 PM
One of the downsides to having so many uke-related resources available online these days is that uke players are starting to sound like guitar players who over-think everything about their instruments to the point where they don't spend any more time actually playing music. :uhoh: As informative as this forum is, reading countless posts about strings, nut widths, bracing patterns, neck thicknesses, tonewoods, and other things that can't be summed up by a bunch of adjectives on the internet is going to make you neurotic and you will dwell on all of these details and always want something else. It's the "grass is greener on the other side" syndrome. One of my good friends (a guitarist) does this all the time, and I've never seen someone buy and return/resell guitars/pedals/amps so fast because they don't feel right and they don't match the sound in his head. I'm convinced that the sound in his head doesn't exist in any single piece of equipment.

It sucks if you don't live near a couple of good music stores and can't try out stuff before you buy it, but unfortunately you won't know for sure what you'll be happy with unless you try it first. And it might be a nearly-endless cycle of buying stuff off the internet and unloading it.

If you're really unhappy with what you have, your best bet is to track down stuff you're interested in and try it out any way you can before you buy. Meetups with other UUers are great for trying stuff out because most people here are super nice. Don't unload your ukes yet, because you might end up liking what you have better than everything else out there!

And who knows? "The one" might just not exist for you and you'll have to settle for having a couple of ukes that still make you happy. That's never a bad thing!

OldePhart
05-13-2014, 03:20 PM
It's very, very, common and rooted in a couple of things. First, as you play your ear will improve (and it will improve faster if you're playng instruments that intonate properly, BTW). Anyway, you run into very real limitations of lower end instruments. You don't have to spend a fortune to get a good instrument but you do have to know what you're looking for and sometimes that just takes experience. Also, if you have the fortune to spend on a really good instrument your chances of finding it to be adequate or even "the one" are much better than with an inexpensive instrument - in essence, you are trading money for reduced frustration. Again, spending money isn't the only answer, nor is it foolproof - you can easily throw money at the wrong "solution." But, if you have the money and you really want to get good..spend some money.

Another thing though is that often we want a shortcut to being a good player. I'm as guilty of this as anyone, but there aren't any. Years ago I used to joke that I kept buying guitars because I was looking for the one that would make me a better player. Then, I had a custom guitar built. It did make me a better player but largely because it was so good that I realized all the limitations I'd been complaining about on my other guitars were actually just poor technique. I saw this because when I picked up the guitar at the builder's shop he was playing flawless ZZ top covers on it while it sounded like crap in my hands (by comparison, anyway). That experience was actually worth the price of the custom guitar because I stopped looking outside for excuses and started hitting the old woodshed.

Write this on the inside of your forehead..."if the instrument intonates well then any shortcomings of my technique are the fault of inadequate practice, not the instrument." The action is not "too high" if the instrument intonates well all up the fretboard...it's a physical impossibility...at that point you have to suck it up and realize that wanting to be a good player is not going to make you a good player. Wanting to be a good player so badly that you will make time to spend two or three or four hours a day playing will make you a good player.

Okay...down off my soap box now.

John

CeeJay
05-13-2014, 03:20 PM
One of the downsides to having so many uke-related resources available online these days is that uke players are starting to sound like guitar players who over-think everything about their instruments to the point where they don't spend any more time actually playing music. :uhoh: As informative as this forum is, reading countless posts about strings, nut widths, bracing patterns, neck thicknesses, tonewoods, and other things that can't be summed up by a bunch of adjectives on the internet is going to make you neurotic and you will dwell on all of these details and always want something else. It's the "grass is greener on the other side" syndrome.

....oh yeah baby ...this man rocks ....spot on ....hey my uke "stable" consists of a 10.00 Lazy Palm (fantastic sounds you can make with it )....a 60 CK10 concert Ohana (fantastic sounds you can make with it ) and my very old and much loved Banjo Uke ( Yes you guessed) of Uncertain Provenance .......all three are the "one" ...cos they are mine and I love 'em.......

Icelander53
05-13-2014, 03:29 PM
I pretty much agree with the last two posts. I over analyze unimportant things because I convince myself they will help me play better. I would love to blame weak technique on the action or strings when it likely is not. I spend a lot of time shopping and dreaming. Like with woman in my youth I wanted to try them all. The only thing I have going for me is that I usually do practice around two hour per day. So it all works out for me. :cool: I accept my weaknesses and strengths and hope I land somewhere in the middle.

To be an average player has always been my realistic goal. I'm not ultra talented and I started playing at almost 61. Not a good start to end up like James Hill. But I have a LOT of fun. So my goals are truly being met so far.

CeeJay
05-13-2014, 04:21 PM
I pretty much agree with the last two posts. I over analyze unimportant things because I convince myself they will help me play better. I would love to blame weak technique on the action or strings when it likely is not. I spend a lot of time shopping and dreaming. Like with woman in my youth I wanted to try them all. The only thing I have going for me is that I usually do practice around two hour per day. So it all works out for me. :cool: I accept my weaknesses and strengths and hope I land somewhere in the middle.

To be an average player has always been my realistic goal. I'm not ultra talented and I started playing at almost 61. Not a good start to end up like James Hill. But I have a LOT of fun. So my goals are truly being met so far.

...As Inspector Callaghan says " a Mans gotta know his limitations " and then you can work on them ....and two hours a day will get help get 'em sorted ...and that "LOT of fun" is worth loads...

Cheers

Mattyukaholic
05-13-2014, 11:12 PM
I think it's possible to over analyse both ways though. I mean, it's not always a bad thing if someone flips between a lot of ukes as long as one incredibly important thing applies: it gives them pleasure!

I think for some people there's a buzz in lusting after different instruments, looking at pictures, the exciting opening of the box etc. It's no different to having lots of expensive shoes or clothes. You don't need them all but sometimes it sure is nice to get them.

jcarlos
05-14-2014, 01:00 AM
Actually, there are lots of perfect ukuleles around. But they are only perfect in specific circumstances. Although some come close, no uke is truly perfect at everything. They are always best at something in particular. These may create conflicts.
1) A linear tuned instrument can do things a reentrant tuned uke can't. Chords sound different with some better one way or the other. Also reentrant sounds much better if you like claw hammer.
2) Do you prefer to play lead or chords? Fingerstyle or with a pick?
3) Some songs sound better with a smooth warm jazzy tone, others with a bright, zippy tone.
4) You probably don't want to take your $3000 custom uke out camping. Use the $100 laminate for that.
5) A soprano may cut through better for some situations, but a tenor is better for larger hands.
6) Some days you might just want to play a koa instead of a maple instrument. Aesthetics count too.

You see. This is just scratching the surface. Plus, ukes are often relatively inexpensive and occupy little real estate in the house. So making additions can be fairly painless, to a point. (But don't tell the wife :).) UAS is real and will always be there.

Good luck with your herd.

This is how I feel about the topic as well, when I first started playing I had several poor instruments and now I own several good instruments, not necessarily expensive but good clean tone and good intonation, that criteria is what I find to be the most important to me. After that I judge by neck play-ability and sometimes if the neck does not feel good to me, i will pass on the instrument regardless of how good it sounds. if I'm not comfortable playing it, it will show up in the music. A wise man told me this when I first started and now that I've been playing for a while its very true. If your not comfortable with your instrument it will take away from the experience.

Now a days instead of me looking for 'better' I end up looking for 'different'. Once you reach a certain level where an instrument is not crap, "better" becomes subjective. Add in the mixture of different tunings and different strings and brands, you end up with a never ending game haha. If you can play just one instrument and be happy with it, thats awesome, but finding the "one" does not exist for me, far too many unique sounds out there for me to stick to one stringed instrument.

RAB11
05-14-2014, 02:56 AM
This thread reminds me of a quote from a guitar forum I used to lurk a bit on.

"Every person who has ever picked up a guitar will spend the rest of their lives searching for the perfect tone that will shooting jizzing unicorns riding rainbows out of the amp"

And I agree. Thankfully I'm skint, so I'll never have to go through constantly changing instruments searching for satisfaction. My Dolphin served the purpose of getting me into the instrument, now my Korala is doing the job of letting me be taken a bit more seriously at open mics, as well as sounding a lot better. That'll do me for now, I could perhaps do with a second concert so I can have one re-entrant, one Low-G but in reality that'd just be a luxury. If the time comes when I'm doing 'proper' gigs and my set list calls for different tunings then that'll be when I take the plunge.

DownUpDave
05-14-2014, 03:00 AM
This is a great thread with some excellent posts and different points of view. I think there is some validity in trying different ukes till you figure out the size you like, the neck width and profile and the sound, ie bright and loud or something more soft and mellow. Then you can start to narrow down your search.

I apprieciate the comments about changing strings and giving them ENOUGH time to settle in before making a judgement. As many wise experienced players have pointed out, better skills and technique can make almost anything sound good. At the end of the day it is all about being happy with what you have. True wealth is wanting what you have as opposed to trying to have what you want.

Ok, I am off to the marketplace forum to see what I can luste after :drool:

ichadwick
05-14-2014, 04:55 AM
Is it just me or is there never an end to trying to find the perfect ukulele?

Nope. It's a journey, not a destination.

And don't even suggest that ukulele players are attention-deficit and fickle... ooooo! shiny!

1931jim
05-14-2014, 05:54 AM
Wow! Three Canucks replies in a row. I have three inexpensive ukes. Each with a specific purpose. My Makala soprano for my backpack on my bike rides by the river. My Oscar Schmidt OU 2 concert mahagony laminate everything. A very nice size and tone for the armchair playing. And my Oscar Schmidt OU 4 Tenor with laminate everything also, spruce top and rosewood back and sides. It was too loud for me so I made a little rosette for the sound hole. It is my favourite now. One of each size. I am contented. I think that is the secret of life. If we are healthy and contented. Jim

DaveY
05-14-2014, 06:31 AM
". . . that will shooting jizzing unicorns . . .".

Thanks for ruining unicorns for me.

Icelander53
05-14-2014, 07:05 AM
Wow! Three Canucks replies in a row. I have three inexpensive ukes. Each with a specific purpose. My Makala soprano for my backpack on my bike rides by the river. My Oscar Schmidt OU 2 concert mahagony laminate everything. A very nice size and tone for the armchair playing. And my Oscar Schmidt OU 4 Tenor with laminate everything also, spruce top and rosewood back and sides. It was too loud for me so I made a little rosette for the sound hole. It is my favourite now. One of each size. I am contented. I think that is the secret of life. If we are healthy and contented. Jim

I agree. Actually from a practical standpoint, from my perspective as a kick around at home player and with the occasional friend, laminates if well made are all one would actually need. If they played well they would sound very nice/

However I enjoy the process of shopping for ukes and then trying them out and upgrading here and there. Most of the time that is. When you get that less than expected uke and you wait too long and can't send it back it can leave you feeling sour. That's why your perspective is ultimately best imo. I just can't seem to manage it in this lifetime.

peaceweaver3
05-14-2014, 07:33 AM
In the end it's not about the instrument or you, but about the music. In the same manner as a painting there is no one perfect brush...

True. However, and also true, you need an instrument that you resonate with (pun intended), and you just don't bond with some instruments. With others, even if you bonded at some point, in time you move on from them. It's the nature of life to evolve, and it's time we got used to it. 'Cause it's gonna happen whether we likes it or not. :D

ichadwick
05-14-2014, 07:41 AM
The secret to finding the perfect ukulele is actually quite simple.

First: Start with a million dollars....

Second: Buy ukuleles.

Third: Start over with another million dollars....

JeremyR
05-14-2014, 08:13 AM
This issue is common with pretty much any instrument. At least, any of the instruments I have tried playing.

Other people have covered the topic pretty well, so I will just add this: I have tried out and bought a reasonable number of guitars, mandolins, banjos, ukuleles, etc. over the years and have never found the "perfect" instrument -- one that plays effortlessly and sounds amazing for everything. I eventually concluded that is because there is no such instrument. Playing effortlessly and sounding amazing are, IMHO, mostly the product of the player's ability rather than the instrument. Particularly with acoustic instruments. That's not to say the instrument doesn't matter; just that, again IMHO, most people will get better results practicing than they will doing the revolving door routine.

I understand shopping for and occasionally buying new instruments is fun and exciting, and I fully encourage it. But it can become an obsession to the detriment of the player's development if the player is convinced that everything will be right once the one perfect instrument is found. Because it never will be.

DownUpDave
05-14-2014, 01:28 PM
The secret to finding the perfect ukulele is actually quite simple.

First: Start with a million dollars....

Second: Buy ukuleles.

Third: Start over with another million dollars....

Sage advice Ian.

Another is " those that think money can't buy happiness just don't know what to shop for"

Nickie
05-14-2014, 06:01 PM
I'll have to say that one of the two ukes I just got is "the one"....I can't put it down, I can't find a thing wrong with it. I hope I connect with the other one, too, I really like it, moslty....

DownUpDave
05-14-2014, 06:05 PM
I'll have to say that one of the two ukes I just got is "the one"....I can't put it down, I can't find a thing wrong with it. I hope I connect with the other one, too, I really like it, moslty....

Ok you got me.............which one is it???