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View Full Version : Romero Creations tiny tenor string ? and a scale ?



Spud1$
05-12-2014, 03:45 PM
I bought a Koa Romero creation tiny tenor uke on this forum. I really lucked out and have a beautiful perfect condition uke for a used price. It came strung with a low G set of La Bella strings. I think that I have decided that I like a high g sound better. I switched the g string for a high g Daniel Ho string that I had for my Kala uke. It's kind of floppy and I know that this uke was designed for a low g. I read a review on the forum where a member switched out a low for a high also using LaBella.
I don't know how to tell on the packaging a high from a low if it doesn't describe the string as such. Perhaps since I don't know the answer I shouldn't own what I consider a very nice uke. I have been practicing almost a year but have no previous music instrument experience. This leads me to my second question. Why when playing some scales are the notes different going backwards? I've been practicing Uke of Carls Hanon for Ukulele. i.e. C scale is the same either way D scale is not. Hope I'm understandable and sorry for the long length of this post.

DaveY
05-13-2014, 10:52 AM
I've been looking at that same ukulele myself, and also am interested in it in high G. I don't know that it was designed for a low G -- more of the sound samples that I found were in low G, but here are links to two in high G (one by Pepe Romero himself, the other on his website):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxeRRDzT9YA&feature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8dDeTeWl6w

I don't understand why you would switch a low G for a low G if you want high G (unless I'm misunderstanding something). Also, when you do have a high G string, make sure that you are tuning it to high G, not low G that is, they are an octave apart from each other.

in my experience, the package indicates high G or low G, and you can see it going down in size (getting smaller) from the G string to the C string (to the E and A), then it's low G; but if it goes up in size from the G string to the C string (and then down the rest of the way), then it's high G.

For example, on Fremont Black Line low G it's listed as
4th (G) string = 0.036 inches
3rd (C) string = 0.031 inches
2nd (E) string = 0.027 inches
1st (A) string = 0.023 inches

If the packaging doesn't list this, you probably can tell by looking at the string and comparing the thickness to the other strings. (And remember that the 4th string is the one closest to you when holding the ukulele.)

I don't think that this disqualifies you from owning a nice uke. My lack of knowledge about some things hasn't disqualified me, so . . .

I don't understand what you mean by "going backwards."

I hope that this was helpful (and accurate!).

Spud1$
05-13-2014, 02:17 PM
Davy y you are correct I screwed up and typed that I switched to a Daniel Ho low G when in fact I switched to a high g. The La Bella stings give #'s but don't specify high or low. The numbers are 1. 029. 2.033 3 041 4. 029 which I can't translate. Going backwards meant do re mi fa so la te do. That would be forward Then it seems like it should be do te la so fa mi re do. And that would be backwards. Take for instance the D scale it is not exactly the same forwards as back wards. I hope I've been clearer. Also I read somewhere maybe on the Romero website that this uke was specifically designed for a low G. Any way I love this little Uke it's beautiful to look at and I think it sounds really sweet. Next I will edit the original post so it makes some sense. Thanks

DaveY
05-13-2014, 02:37 PM
The La Bella stings give #'s but don't specify high or low. The numbers are 1. 029. 2.033 3 041 4. 029 which I can't translate.

That looks like high G to me; the G (4th) string is thinner (lower number) than the C (3rd) string.


Going backwards meant do re mi fa so la te do. That would be forward Then it seems like it should be do te la so fa mi re do. And that would be backwards. Take for instance the D scale it is not exactly the same forwards as back wards.

Hmmm. The only thing I can think of is that you're playing the same note in different ways. For example, to play A ("sol") you can play the A (1st) string unfretted (open) or you could play the E (2nd) string by fretting on the 5th fret (the one where there usually is the first fret marker). There are other ways to play the same notes on the fretboard, too.


I don't know what to make of "specifically designed for a low G" I've heard of some ukes supposedly sounding better one way or the other, but that can be very subjective.

Spud1$
05-13-2014, 02:51 PM
That looks like high G to me; the G (4th) string is thinner (lower number) than the C (3rd) string.



Hmmm. The only thing I can think of is that you're playing the same note in different ways. For example, to play A ("sol") you can play the A (1st) string unfretted (open) or you could play the E (2nd) string by fretting on the 5th fret (the one where there usually is the first fret marker). There are other ways to play the same notes on the fretboard, too.


I don't know what to make of "specifically designed for a low G" – I've heard of some ukes supposedly sounding better one way or the other, but that can be very subjective.
Okay, that makes perfect sense about the scale and now when I look at the fret board map I have I understand. Also I cannot find any place where it says specifically designed for a low G expect from the forum member who sold me this uke. Also in the mean time I thought you were probably right and that I had the wrong octave and that's why my string was floppy so I tightened g until it snapped. I am going to put the low G back for now, since that's all I have and appreciate your help. You also made the string numbers clear for me. Thanks