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RAB11
05-15-2014, 05:23 AM
So my girlfriend's starting to learn the uke, which has made me very chuffed. The only thing is, she won't play in front of anyone at the moment, even me, because she gets a bit embarrassed. So I gave her the book I learnt from to start with and she's been working on a couple songs of her own that she's got tabs from the internet for. She won't even tell the songs she's trying to learn bless her but she's determined to sort it out.

From what I can gather from what she's telling me, she's starting to get chord changes under control but as she hasn't done anything musical since a recorder way back when she ain't got no riddum so strumming is a problem. I'm self-taught, and not in the most methodical way either so I have no idea what to suggest in terms of learning rhythm and strumming patterns other then "pick a song you know, play what feels right".

She's actually gonna show me how she's getting on this evening and wants my help with the strumming. Any suggestions on how I can encourage her and get her to think more rhythmically?

peaceweaver3
05-15-2014, 07:20 AM
Since she clearly wants to do as much on her own as possible - I get that, I was and am that way - point her to Aldrine's Uke Minutes. And/or ask if she wants a UU+ subscription. Then she doesn't have to play in front of anyone and can learn at her own pace with video and audio demos.

kwall
05-15-2014, 08:22 AM
when i learned ukulele i used ukulele-tricks.com it doesnt get yeah far but he helps with a few songs and good with strumming and keeping the pace easy. It gave me confidence cause i could know a few songs well (ish for a beginner). I think she needs to learn a song she loves inside and out and then she will show you (or at least thats how i feel)

ChrisDeston821
05-15-2014, 09:02 AM
Same boat buddy, Jess got herself a baritone but is very self conscious about it.
I was self taught in an awkward around the houses way and Jess struggles with her strums.
I've used a percussive beat looped to help Jess to understand and hear the rhythm and when to strum.

Try to ensure the tabs and songs she chooses are relatively easy ones -
Being new and failing songs that have awkward B and E chords whilst your partner easily flies through a C G Am F sequence is disheartening.
Jess needed to be made aware that she was struggling because she was trying things that I might not attempt at my level.
Once I suggested a few easier songs she got more into it. She was really into the idea of writing an original song too.

I'll nudge her onto this thread tomorrow as I feel she's in the same position as your mrs and might be able to offer a better insight than me :)

philrab66
05-15-2014, 11:24 AM
So my girlfriend's starting to learn the uke, which has made me very chuffed. The only thing is, she won't play in front of anyone at the moment, even me, because she gets a bit embarrassed. So I gave her the book I learnt from to start with and she's been working on a couple songs of her own that she's got tabs from the internet for. She won't even tell the songs she's trying to learn bless her but she's determined to sort it out.

From what I can gather from what she's telling me, she's starting to get chord changes under control but as she hasn't done anything musical since a recorder way back when she ain't got no riddum so strumming is a problem. I'm self-taught, and not in the most methodical way either so I have no idea what to suggest in terms of learning rhythm and strumming patterns other then "pick a song you know, play what feels right".

She's actually gonna show me how she's getting on this evening and wants my help with the strumming. Any suggestions on how I can encourage her and get her to think more rhythmically?

This is an easy song to play just one chord. Should get her rhythm going.
http://ukuleleinthedark.com/ud-33-mr-g7-goes-west-low-rider/

PhilUSAFRet
05-15-2014, 11:49 AM
Some folks need a metronome to help train their brains. Can probably find one online. Also, maybe a small drum machine. Here's a great play along site: http://www.ukuleleplayalong.nl/# Select the tuning, find a song, and play along with the original artist.

actadh
05-15-2014, 12:04 PM
Love the word "chuffed" - have to admit I had to look it up.

It helped me to learn to strum to play songs that were even tempo throughout so I could play more as a background. It helped me to focus on playing steadily and the rhythm fell into place. It also helps to know the song very well. Nursery rhymes are good, but quickly got boring . Some songs that worked for me were

You Are My Sunshine
Ring of Fire
Blowin' In The Wind - the last one is available in Uncle Rod's boot camp, which is highly recommended. It is available in the Ukulele Play Along link found above, which is great - thank you to the person who posted that.

RAB11
05-15-2014, 08:06 PM
Same boat buddy, Jess got herself a baritone but is very self conscious about it.
I was self taught in an awkward around the houses way and Jess struggles with her strums.
I've used a percussive beat looped to help Jess to understand and hear the rhythm and when to strum.

Try to ensure the tabs and songs she chooses are relatively easy ones -
Being new and failing songs that have awkward B and E chords whilst your partner easily flies through a C G Am F sequence is disheartening.
Jess needed to be made aware that she was struggling because she was trying things that I might not attempt at my level.
Once I suggested a few easier songs she got more into it. She was really into the idea of writing an original song too.

I'll nudge her onto this thread tomorrow as I feel she's in the same position as your mrs and might be able to offer a better insight than me :)

Cheers Chris.

She showed me a couple songs she was working on, Photograph by Nickelback which I thought was a cracking choice for a beginner, and then YMCA. She was actually more comfortable with YMCA even though it looked by far the trickier. But she was starting to play and sing at the same time, just not very fluent and was struggling in particular with the Nickelback one. So I took a look at it and the tab wasn't set out logically at all, so I explained to her my method I have of separating a song into parts to make it easier to think about. It's basically a four chord pattern but she was getting confused because you strum the first chord three times before singing, and she was starting the pattern over a bar (and chord) too early. I think I helped but she had to really psyche herself up to even help me.

I didn't even think of the Uke minutes on here! I'm not sure how serious she wants to take it yet so that could be a good plan actually, cheers guys.

Roselynne
05-15-2014, 09:11 PM
Playing and singing really helps ... except at the beginning, which is the part where everything falls into chaos. (She may just need to hear that this is a normal and temporary rite of passage.)

If you know some standard strums, maybe you could play those together, not even trying to play a song. Jotting them down in "DUDU' format may be the easiest for her to read and use for "homework." If her inhibitions are anything like mine ... starting out with things like chord changes and scales may ease her into playing something with you, even if she continues to explore real songs on her own for now.

peejay52
05-15-2014, 10:15 PM
Playing and singing really helps ... except at the beginning, which is the part where everything falls into chaos. (She may just need to hear that this is a normal and temporary rite of passage.

So glad you said that....im normal....phew...