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Roselynne
05-25-2014, 10:26 PM
Do any of you leave string ends uncut when re-stringing? If so, how do you make those loopy hoops at the tuners look so neat?

I ask because I've always trimmed my strings at the tuners. Now, however, I have one very old ukulele with violin pegs (just wooden pegs with slots in the top), and I'd like to change out its current gCEA strings and replace them with period-correct ADF#B strings.

Up 'til now I've been putting this off, because cowardice ... but I digress. Point is ... if ever there were a need to leave strings untrimmed, this is it!

Any wisdom would be warmly accepted. The only thing I don't want to do, at this point, is to modernize the tuners. I've got friction- and gear-tuned ukuleles, too, but I'm tryin' to keep this one authentic.

Many thanks in advance!

mm stan
05-25-2014, 10:53 PM
Aloha Roselynne,
Until I Know I am satisfied with the strings I do not cut them, as I could repurpose them for another Ukulele....also when I first started, I may have mixed up
the order of the strings... think it was just once...

Roselynne
05-25-2014, 11:36 PM
Oooooohhhhh, yeah! I've mis-ordered the strings, or had to make other adjustments ... uhhh ... let's just say, more than once.

For this particular ukulele, it looks like I need to leave the strings untrimmed, period.

Here's a link to a pic of the pegs in question (hope it works):


Violin Pegs (http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/album.php?albumid=1781&attachmentid=43737)

Jim Hanks
05-26-2014, 01:42 AM
For this particular ukulele, it looks like I need to leave the strings untrimmed, period.


Violin Pegs (http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/album.php?albumid=1781&attachmentid=43737)
Why? What is the advantage of leaving untrimmed?

anthonyg
05-26-2014, 02:32 AM
Assuming that I know that I have the right strings on the instrument then I DO trim both ends of the strings once they are fitted. At the bridge end I fit the skinniest string first (A) and pull the string end up towards the other end of the saddle. Then you fit the next string and capture the end of the first string underneath. Repeat until the end. Then cut all the string ends evenly at the G string end.

Anthony

UkerDanno
05-26-2014, 03:52 AM
Why? What is the advantage of leaving untrimmed?

that's what I was wondering...

cantsing
05-26-2014, 05:23 AM
I don't trim the strings until I know that I won't be removing them in the near future. For me, once the strings are trimmed, they are harder to reuse.


If so, how do you make those loopy hoops at the tuners look so neat?
I wrap most of the extra length into a circle consisting of multiple loops of string. Then I take the last few inches of the string and spiral it around the loops to hold them together.

Roselynne
05-26-2014, 10:08 AM
I don't trim the strings until I know that I won't be removing them in the near future. For me, once the strings are trimmed, they are harder to reuse.


I wrap most of the extra length into a circle consisting of multiple loops of string. Then I take the last few inches of the string and spiral it around the loops to hold them together.

Many thanks! I think this is the method I'm looking for!

Weirdly enough, I do know how to trim guitar/ukulele strings. Actually, that's my standard practice. What I don't/didn't know, is how to keep 'em untrimmed and still looking good.

On this particular (old) ukulele, the strings aren't threaded into holes, but are inserted into slots at the top of each "violin peg."

These violin pegs are just like fat standard screws made of wood, and the tuner holes are just ... holes in the wood. Nothing holds the pegs in place but the strings.

It's about as close to zero-tech as a stringed instrument can be. Some slippage is unavoidable, so extra length is necessary.

Sounds bright and loud when it's finally all set up! Stays in tune fairly well, too.

stringy
05-26-2014, 11:38 AM
I trim both ends immediately after i tune the new strings. To leave them on gives me the heebie jeebies. Can't stand it!
(I also remove the tuner after tuning :cool:)

Gottliver
05-26-2014, 12:54 PM
I trim both ends immediately after i tune the new strings. To leave them on gives me the heebie jeebies. Can't stand it!
(I also remove the tuner after tuning :cool:)

(I also remove the tuner after tuning :cool:)[/QUOTE] AMEN!!!

Roselynne
05-26-2014, 01:11 PM
I trim both ends immediately after i tune the new strings. To leave them on gives me the heebie jeebies. Can't stand it!
(I also remove the tuner after tuning :cool:)


(I also remove the tuner after tuning :cool:) AMEN!!![/QUOTE]

I trim and remove clip-on tuners, too ... on all of the others! This ukulele, however, is ... special. For this one, I truly need the extra length, but I also need the strings to look good and stay out of my face.

stringy
05-26-2014, 01:53 PM
AMEN!!!

I trim and remove clip-on tuners, too ... on all of the others! This ukulele, however, is ... special.[quote]



Oh, Got it :)

Dane
05-26-2014, 03:59 PM
If its a new set of strings I've never used I probably won't trim them immediately, but within about 5 minutes of stretching the strings out I will know... and usually trim them immediately.

If you use any wound or metal strings, I recommend trimming them immediately or making sure they don't touch the headstock. The vibrations from the instrument can grind the excess string around on the headstock. It's the same reason you shouldn't wear shirts with buttons when playing instruments with high vibrations, it will leave marks on the instrument.

mm stan
05-26-2014, 11:30 PM
Nothing wrong with looping the strings...it's mostly an asthetic thing...don't bother me ....

Roselynne
05-27-2014, 12:16 AM
I guess my next question is this:

Does anybody trim the strings on -- specifically -- a violin-pegged ukulele? This venerable instrument has wooden pegs with slots on top. The wooden pegs go into wooden holes (which are just ... holes drilled in wood, no washers, grommets or anything).

This design is more primitive than friction tuners. I can't see how the strings could stay in place if I trimmed 'em.

PLEASE NOTE: I do know how to trim strings on friction-and gear-tuned ukuleles and guitars. (Both nylon and steel strings.) I have several instruments, and have re-strung them all, at one time or another, and they all get trimmed.

This particular antique, however, is a different proposition.

Thanks!

mm stan
05-27-2014, 01:37 AM
I guess my next question is this:

Does anybody trim the strings on -- specifically -- a violin-pegged ukulele? This venerable instrument has wooden pegs with slots on top. The wooden pegs go into wooden holes (which are just ... holes drilled in wood, no washers, grommets or anything).

This design is more primitive than friction tuners. I can't see how the strings could stay in place if I trimmed 'em.

PLEASE NOTE: I do know how to trim strings on friction-and gear-tuned ukuleles and guitars. (Both nylon and steel strings.) I have several instruments, and have re-strung them all, at one time or another, and they all get trimmed.

This particular antique, however, is a different proposition.

Thanks!

Aloha Roselynne,
Look at my nunes....67137 slip string inbetween peg slot of wooden tuning peg and just tie a knot from slipping and tighten as usual...after the knot you can cut or no cut the string. Hope it helps, good luck

Icelander53
05-27-2014, 03:21 AM
I do whatever the people here tell me to do/

Jon Moody
05-27-2014, 03:31 AM
If you use any wound or metal strings, I recommend trimming them immediately or making sure they don't touch the headstock. The vibrations from the instrument can grind the excess string around on the headstock. It's the same reason you shouldn't wear shirts with buttons when playing instruments with high vibrations, it will leave marks on the instrument.

I've had worse headstock injuries from cutting the wound string a bit long and while tuning, having the cut end scrape the headstock. Having a wound/looped extra is not going to harm the headstock; the vibrations are going to need to be severe for it to do any damage, especially since there's no weight on the wound/looped part to hold it down onto the headstock while it's vibrating. If anything, I'd be more concerned about the wound/looped string coming undone and smacking me in the face while playing.

Same with buttons on your shirt. I had a friend with a 10k bass let me play it with a buttoned shirt on, and said he wasn't worried in the least. It's gotta be some major vibrations, and the two pieces have to have some weight against each other to create a reasonable enough amount of friction to cause any damage. And even then, it's going to take a long time for that to really show.

Dane
05-27-2014, 04:57 AM
I've had worse headstock injuries from cutting the wound string a bit long and while tuning, having the cut end scrape the headstock. Having a wound/looped extra is not going to harm the headstock; the vibrations are going to need to be severe for it to do any damage, especially since there's no weight on the wound/looped part to hold it down onto the headstock while it's vibrating. If anything, I'd be more concerned about the wound/looped string coming undone and smacking me in the face while playing.

Same with buttons on your shirt. I had a friend with a 10k bass let me play it with a buttoned shirt on, and said he wasn't worried in the least. It's gotta be some major vibrations, and the two pieces have to have some weight against each other to create a reasonable enough amount of friction to cause any damage. And even then, it's going to take a long time for that to really show.

It depends on the instruments. For example, hollow body guitars and semi-hollow body guitars, button up shirts are a known issue. And as for the wound strings on the headstock, if they are bent in certain directions, the bend of the wire can apply force onto the headstock. If left in an orientation like this, the strings can grind on the headstock, usually along the edges.

Jon Moody
05-27-2014, 05:05 AM
It depends on the instruments. For example, hollow body guitars and semi-hollow body guitars, button up shirts are a known issue. And as for the wound strings on the headstock, if they are bent in certain directions, the bend of the wire can apply force onto the headstock. If left in an orientation like this, the strings can grind on the headstock, usually along the edges.

On a full steel string, I would agree. However, given that large majority of tie end strings used on ukuleles have a silk core, the downward force will not be nearly as great.

Roselynne
05-27-2014, 11:06 AM
Aloha Roselynne,
Look at my nunes....67137 slip string inbetween peg slot of wooden tuning peg and just tie a knot from slipping and tighten as usual...after the knot you can cut or no cut the string. Hope it helps, good luck

Thanks! This does help! I don't do tuner knots on my other instruments (not even nylons), so that truly simple thought didn't even cross my mind. :o

My little nameless darlin' came from an excellent luthier who strongly recommended that I keep the loops but ... uhhh ... I forgot to ask him how to make 'em, and keep 'em looking good. Over time, they've gone straggly.

If the new strings can be trimmed, so much the better!

I would NEVER consider leaving a 6-string, or even a tenor ukulele, untrimmed. All steel strings, and wound nylon bass strings, are too sharp, heavy and pointy for my peace of mind. That, plus I can't even imagine leaving a classical guitar headstock shaggy.

Thanks again!

iamesperambient
05-27-2014, 09:49 PM
Do any of you leave string ends uncut when re-stringing? If so, how do you make those loopy hoops at the tuners look so neat?

I ask because I've always trimmed my strings at the tuners. Now, however, I have one very old ukulele with violin pegs (just wooden pegs with slots in the top), and I'd like to change out its current gCEA strings and replace them with period-correct ADF#B strings.

Up 'til now I've been putting this off, because cowardice ... but I digress. Point is ... if ever there were a need to leave strings untrimmed, this is it!

Any wisdom would be warmly accepted. The only thing I don't want to do, at this point, is to modernize the tuners. I've got friction- and gear-tuned ukuleles, too, but I'm tryin' to keep this one authentic.

Many thanks in advance!

I wish i could pay someone to string for me mine always look crappy but of course they sound/work fine just not a very neat string installer :/

mm stan
05-27-2014, 10:35 PM
Thanks! This does help! I don't do tuner knots on my other instruments (not even nylons), so that truly simple thought didn't even cross my mind. :o

My little nameless darlin' came from an excellent luthier who strongly recommended that I keep the loops but ... uhhh ... I forgot to ask him how to make 'em, and keep 'em looking good. Over time, they've gone straggly.

If the new strings can be trimmed, so much the better!

I would NEVER consider leaving a 6-string, or even a tenor ukulele, untrimmed. All steel strings, and wound nylon bass strings, are too sharp, heavy and pointy for my peace of mind. That, plus I can't even imagine leaving a classical guitar headstock shaggy.

Thanks again!

Aloha Roselynn...Usually guitar wound strings are so stiff the you just have to bend them to one side and they hold...as for length, yes they do scratch the head stock, cut them ..what I do on ukes and guitars with gloss finishes is use Blue paniter tape surrounding the tuning pegs and bridge to protect from scratches when installing wounded strings...an extra step but well worth the chance of scratching an very expensive finish and regretting it.... glad I could help you...Happy strummings..

Roselynne
05-27-2014, 10:44 PM
I wish i could pay someone to string for me mine always look crappy but of course they sound/work fine just not a very neat string installer :/

Hey, if the strings play well ... No Harm, No Foul!

I do know some folks take their guitars down to the nearest music store and pay 'em to do the job. Others rely on friends, teachers and/or significant others. If you know a good restringer, for pay or for free, they may be able to show you some tricks. Then again .... take a good look at some pro players' headstocks. Not always pretty!

Restringing is one of the few skills I retained from my adolescent guitar fumbles, and I had (still have) a lot to relearn. On top of that, I added slotted headstocks to my crew. Some of my work looks pretty good; some of it, not so much. The worst job I saw on one of mine was performed by a guitar tech as part of a repair job.

Now, if I could only get the courage to learn to do my own setups ...

MMStan ... gotta get some painter's tape! Just changed a slotted head steel-stringed guitar for the first time. Thrills and chills, but both of us survived without scars. Satin finish, but scratches still show.

mm stan
05-27-2014, 11:44 PM
Hey, if the strings play well ... No Harm, No Foul!

I do know some folks take their guitars down to the nearest music store and pay 'em to do the job. Others rely on friends, teachers and/or significant others. If you know a good restringer, for pay or for free, they may be able to show you some tricks. Then again .... take a good look at some pro players' headstocks. Not always pretty!

Restringing is one of the few skills I retained from my adolescent guitar fumbles, and I had (still have) a lot to relearn. On top of that, I added slotted headstocks to my crew. Some of my work looks pretty good; some of it, not so much. The worst job I saw on one of mine was performed by a guitar tech as part of a repair job.

Now, if I could only get the courage to learn to do my own setups ...

MMStan ... gotta get some painter's tape! Just changed a slotted head steel-stringed guitar for the first time. Thrills and chills, but both of us survived without scars. Satin finish, but scratches still show.
Roselynn.. you can use a thick card stock or business card and tape the sides...mo cheap...LOL painters tape is not as sticky but thinner... then there is green tape less sticker...ha ha
Buy me a couple in and out burgers and we can make a deal changing strings..LOL >>>>:)