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View Full Version : Lowering the G String Question



Wilfros
06-02-2014, 05:03 PM
I have found, for practice chording and picking simple songs, the G string, for now works best for me when tuned on octave lower.

My problem is that, when doing this, the result is a very loose and "soft" string. When playing notes on this string they are hard to pluck, hard to get a clear sound for the note your are wishing and excessive ease a moving the string. I find that when I place my finger on this loose string it allows the finger to move the string easily, offering next to no resistance. this, of course results in a great variety of notes other than the particular one I am wishing to obtain,

My question is this... If you wish to tune the G string an octave lower is there another string I should be placing on the Uke in lieu of the one that is expecting to be tuned to the higher G note?

A newbie question, no doubt, but then I am a newbie so I hope this works together. :D

RichM
06-02-2014, 05:14 PM
No worries, we were all new once! And yes, your instincts are good-- you need a Low G string, which is a heavier string that will take the low G tuning better and have proper tension. You can buy Low G sets and many shops can sell you just a single low G string if you're otherwise happy with your strings.

JayMadison
06-03-2014, 12:35 AM
The ones i've tried are metal wrapped so they add and interesting sound to the uke

peaceweaver3
06-03-2014, 06:12 AM
If you can't find uke-specific strings locally, try a classical guitar D (4th) string. It may squeak when running your finger along it, but it will be better than tuning the original string an octave lower.

Rllink
06-03-2014, 08:19 AM
So if you lower the g string an octave and tune your ukulele that way, what happens to the chords? I guess a g is a g is a g, but I am wondering if the voice changes and if that changes anything as well?

ukeeku
06-03-2014, 08:24 AM
Am I the only one that chuckled at the title of this post?

Kanaka916
06-03-2014, 08:26 AM
One of the more popular low g string . . . the Freemont Soloist available at HMS, Uke Republic

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v486/hawhyen51/FremontSoloist_zps37e252be.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/hawhyen51/media/FremontSoloist_zps37e252be.jpg.html)

RichM
06-03-2014, 08:27 AM
So if you lower the g string an octave and tune your ukulele that way, what happens to the chords? I guess a g is a g is a g, but I am wondering if the voice changes and if that changes anything as well?

Yes, your chord shapes can stay the same, but your voicing changes, as the low G fits in a different aural space than the high G. If you are fingerpicking or single note playing, it changes a lot things; you now have a greater tonal range, since you gain five bass notes you didn't have before. Guitarists will probably like this, as they are used to linear tuning. However, if you are doing fingerpicking or single note runs from tablature, you will need to be aware of whether it is intended for high or low g, since grabbing a high A on the fourth string will sound very different from grabbing a low A.

Wilfros
06-03-2014, 04:20 PM
Am I the only one that chuckled at the title of this post?

Sorry, it wasn't till I read your post that I thought about just what my title asks. LOL

Wilfros
06-06-2014, 11:58 AM
I went out today and bought my new "G String."

Thanks to everyone, it has made a world of difference in the feel and sound of my Uke.