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hawaii 50
06-06-2014, 06:53 AM
can someone give me info on building with Brazilian Rosewood right now in the US...

I read in Fretboard Journal that new laws say no more B/R for commercial use starting June 2014....

thanks

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-06-2014, 07:11 AM
Posted by Chuck Erickson, the Duke of Pearl on June 4th:

Up until now Brazilian rosewood already in the U.S. was legal to buy, sell, use, and ship interstate even without documentation (much old lumber and many vintage guitars lack paperwork, since it wasn’t previously required). But as of June 26th, as a CITES Appendix I species (like elephant ivory) and in conjunction with the new total ban on all elephant ivory, it will become a felony to buy or sell anything containing Brazilian rosewood unless it has proper documentation (http://www.fws.gov/international/pdf/regulation-part23-use-after-import.pdf). To qualify for the exception: “If the [rosewood] was lawfully imported…before the species was listed…you may continue to use the [rosewood]…provided you can clearly demonstrate (using written records or other documentary evidence) that your [rosewood] was imported prior to the CITES listing, with no restrictions on its use after import. If you are unable to clearly demonstrate that this exception applies, the [rosewood] may be used only for noncommercial purposes.”
Good luck to you all trying to get acceptable paperwork for all those guitars..."

Michael Smith
06-06-2014, 10:14 AM
Wow, Felony.......Thats Brutal. anything containing......cripe........does this mean If I sell a ukulele with antique elephant ivory from a piano key I could spend time with the Arian Brotherhood.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-06-2014, 10:20 AM
Indeed it does. Unless you have documentation. There was talk of including the fossil ivories (mammoth & mastodon) because they are hard (by untrained personnel ) to differentiate from elephant ivory but they are still legal to trade in any manner.

Michael Smith
06-06-2014, 12:17 PM
Chuck, are you keeping all the records for mammoth ivory in case some overzealous agent decides to throw you in the hoosegow first and ask questions later?

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-06-2014, 12:31 PM
Chuck, are you keeping all the records for mammoth ivory in case some overzealous agent decides to throw you in the hoosegow first and ask questions later?

Fossil ivories are not included in any ban. They never were and hopefully never will be. I've been working with the same supplier of fossil ivories for over 30 years so documentation is no problem. I'm more worried that koa will be included on one of these lists one day!

coolkayaker1
06-06-2014, 01:28 PM
Chuck, is it illegal to own, or just to sell elephant ivory. For instance, my folks have a hand carved chess set from the 1950s made of elephant ivory. No paperwork, they bought it overseas (in India or something 50 years ago). So now it cannot ever be sold? Can it be shown and displayed? Can one play chess with it in a public park?

pakhan
06-06-2014, 02:04 PM
There has been a lot of this going around- my friend John Thomas, Professor of Law at Quinnipiac university had written a brief commentary on it for fretboard journal: http://www.fretboardjournal.com/features/online/us-fish-and-wildlife-services-updated-not-really-policy-brazilian-rosewood.

The new ruling effectively helps instrument owners:

"Since publication of our regulations in 2007, we have given further consideration to the allowed use of a specimen within the United States when the listing status of the species changes after a specimen has been imported. We are amending this section to clarify that the allowed use after import into the United States is determined by the status of the specimen under CITES and the ESA at the time it is imported, except for a CITES specimen that was imported before the species was listed in Appendix I, or listed in Appendix II with an annotation disallowing commercial use, or listed in Appendix II or III and threatened under the ESA. Where an individual can clearly demonstrate that his or her specimen was imported with no restrictions on its use after import, prior to the species being listed under CITES with restrictions on its use after import, we will continue to allow use of the specimens as allowed at the time of import."

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-06-2014, 02:05 PM
I'm not 100% up to date on elephant ivory but I believe it's legal to own. I have followed this very closely only as it relates to fossil ivories. Here's an excerpt from the NY Times that I think answers your question:
The service will prohibit “all commercial imports of African elephant ivory, including antiques,” and it will prohibit exports except for certified antiques. Sales of elephant ivory across state lines will be prohibited, unless the ivory is demonstrably more than 100 years old. And ivory sales will be prohibited within a state unless the seller can demonstrate that the ivory was lawfully imported before 1990, the year after the signing of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, a United Nations agreement known as Cites. The burden of proof of purchase will fall on the seller, and sales will require rigorous documentation. People can still own ivory and pass heirlooms to descendants.
(BTW, mammoth/mastodon ivories are 10,000 to 40,000 years old and are legal to own, trade, buy, sell, etc.)

coolkayaker1
06-06-2014, 05:05 PM
That helps. Thanks, Chuck, for that. Very much.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-06-2014, 05:56 PM
There has been a lot of this going around- my friend John Thomas, Professor of Law at Quinnipiac university had written a brief commentary on it for fretboard journal: http://www.fretboardjournal.com/features/online/us-fish-and-wildlife-services-updated-not-really-policy-brazilian-rosewood.

The new ruling effectively helps instrument owners:

"Since publication of our regulations in 2007, we have given further consideration to the allowed use of a specimen within the United States when the listing status of the species changes after a specimen has been imported. We are amending this section to clarify that the allowed use after import into the United States is determined by the status of the specimen under CITES and the ESA at the time it is imported, except for a CITES specimen that was imported before the species was listed in Appendix I, or listed in Appendix II with an annotation disallowing commercial use, or listed in Appendix II or III and threatened under the ESA. Where an individual can clearly demonstrate that his or her specimen was imported with no restrictions on its use after import, prior to the species being listed under CITES with restrictions on its use after import, we will continue to allow use of the specimens as allowed at the time of import."

Questions:
What year was BR added to Appendix 1?
How does this affect your stock of BR?

hmgberg
06-06-2014, 07:57 PM
Right now I'm thinking about all of those early Martin ukes with BR fingerboards listed on Ebay.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-06-2014, 09:20 PM
Right now I'm thinking about all of those early Martin ukes with BR fingerboards listed on Ebay.

Even authorized Martin repair people can't get BR parts.

pakhan
06-07-2014, 06:27 AM
Questions:
What year was BR added to Appendix 1?
How does this affect your stock of BR?

1992
not at all - I have CITES certs for mine own stuff.

Timbuck
06-07-2014, 07:59 AM
Can't see a problem..Use Indian rosewood instead..One of these is Indian..the other Brazilian..Guess which is Which ;)

http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/indian_zps439b05b9.jpg (http://s219.photobucket.com/user/shiregreenbod/media/indian_zps439b05b9.jpg.html) http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/brazil_zps709cb1a4.jpg (http://s219.photobucket.com/user/shiregreenbod/media/brazil_zps709cb1a4.jpg.html)

BlackBearUkes
06-07-2014, 08:10 AM
Can't see a problem..Use Indian rosewood instead..One of these is Indian..the other Brazilian..Guess which is Which ;)

http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/indian_zps439b05b9.jpg (http://s219.photobucket.com/user/shiregreenbod/media/indian_zps439b05b9.jpg.html) http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/brazil_zps709cb1a4.jpg (http://s219.photobucket.com/user/shiregreenbod/media/brazil_zps709cb1a4.jpg.html)

After working with the stuff for years I would say the left is Indian and the right is Braz. If the colors here are ture, Indian is never that orange unless it is colored. The real difference is in now they feel and bend, Braz is like glass and much harder.

saltytri
06-07-2014, 08:55 AM
So, I guess that the one set of BZ that I have on hand will someday end up in an instrument that will get donated to a good cause or an "underfunded" musician. :) I can live with that.

BillM
06-07-2014, 10:25 AM
So, I guess that the one set of BZ that I have on hand will someday end up in an instrument that will get donated to a good cause or an "underfunded" musician. :) I can live with that.

There's always the "Bill in Portland needs an Ono tenor" charity... :)

saltytri
06-07-2014, 10:36 AM
Bill, you were first on my list but I think the set is only big enough for a concert. Drat! :)

Michael Smith
06-07-2014, 10:52 AM
My buddy who is a high end piano restorer says they get all the legal elephant ivory they want. Maybe that changes after june I don't know. There is a plethora of rosewoods some look so much like Brazilian I don't think you could tell the diff without testing a sample. I just built a uke with a big chunk of mammoth ivory and rosewood from Peru. Do I have to worry about shipping it? How is that going to work? This whole thing seems insane to me and very un-American. The people who regulate things here in the US have gotten way out of control.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-07-2014, 10:57 AM
My buddy who is a high end piano restorer says they get all the legal elephant ivory they want. Maybe that changes after june I don't know. There is a plethora of rosewoods some look so much like Brazilian I don't think you could tell the diff without testing a sample. I just built a uke with a big chunk of mammoth ivory and rosewood from Peru. Do I have to worry about shipping it? How is that going to work? This whole thing seems insane to me.

You are OK shipping and selling the mammoth ivory. You'll have to check the CITES appendices to see if your particular species of rosewood is listed. Talk to Dirk @ South Coast Ukes or Chuck Erikson @ Duke of Pearl, these guys know as much as anybody I've talked to.

BillM
06-07-2014, 11:15 AM
Bill, you were first on my list but I think the set is only big enough for a concert. Drat! :)

Shoot! I've been told on several occasions that I am number one on a certain list, but this is a list where I would like hold the #1 spot. Perhaps I could make do with a concert... :rolleyes:

Maybe next time?

Sorry, didn't mean to send the thread off the rails. Back to the discussion about ivory and BR.

stringy
06-07-2014, 12:03 PM
You guys are the pros. I am just a consumer. But just another point of view.

As a consumer I intend to only buy sustainable woods from here on out. Yes I am guilty and had to have my Hawaiian Koa ukulele early on. Everyone wants a piece of paradise. Ever since watching Blood Diamonds I have a newfound interest in sustainable woods, etc.

Be it diamonds, ivory, or exotic woods, if there was no market for these things..........

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-07-2014, 12:17 PM
You guys are the pros. I am just a consumer. But just another point of view.

As a consumer I intend to only buy sustainable woods from here on out. Yes I am guilty and had to have my Hawaiian Koa ukulele early on. Everyone wants a piece of paradise. Ever since watching Blood Diamonds I have a newfound interest in sustainable woods, etc.

Be it diamonds, ivory, or exotic woods, if there was no market for these things..........

I agree with you. But koa is a sustainable wood. Large reforestation projects have been going on for quite a while. it's just a matter of poor management in some cases and the demand exceeding the supply.

kkimura
06-08-2014, 01:47 AM
How do the "authorities" determine the species and origin of the wood used? Seems like there is a lot of room for error here.

hawaii 50
06-08-2014, 06:51 AM
I agree with you. But koa is a sustainable wood. Large reforestation projects have been going on for quite a while. it's just a matter of poor management in some cases and the demand exceeding the supply.

Check this out...so cool and the actual land that King had all his Koa tress on in the day...very cool

www.hawaiianlegacytours.com

wickedwahine11
06-08-2014, 06:52 AM
Check this out...so cool and the actual land that King had all his Koa tress on in the day...very cool

www.hawaiianlegacytours.com

Not to hijack the thread, but I have been wanting to do that for a while. I figure after koa ukes, jewelry boxes and jewelry, I owe Hawaii a couple of trees back. I am hoping to schedule it for the next time I am on the Big Island.:)

hawaii 50
06-08-2014, 07:16 AM
Not to hijack the thread, but I have been wanting to do that for a while. I figure after koa ukes, jewelry boxes and jewelry, I owe Hawaii a couple of trees back. I am hoping to schedule it for the next time I am on the Big Island.:)

Great Staci...
I just found about this...and for sure when on the Big Island I think it is a must do for us ukulele lovers(Koa)...
pretty cool that your tree will live forever(even though they will use some of the Koa trees in the future) to bad no one does this for the Brazilian forest...

saltytri
06-08-2014, 07:19 AM
Is that land that is or was part of the Parker Ranch?

Titchtheclown
06-08-2014, 11:08 PM
How do the "authorities" determine the species and origin of the wood used? Seems like there is a lot of room for error here.
F
I am also curious as a lot of Australian timber is marketed under trade names with one extreme being Forest red and Forestst brown which come from mixed forest and are sorted after sawing into redder and browner colors as some trees have redder heartwood.
Even Tasmanian oak can be three species, though those species are sold individually as well. Even hoop pine can be hoop or bunya

The guys in the sawmill trade will tell you to your face that a lot of the time they don't even know.

Of course we do make a rod for our own back using Europeanised names like
She Oak for a casuarina
Tasmanian Oak for some Eucalyptus
Silky oak for a Grevillia

The knowledge of what species we have is also rather limited and it is likely that trees have been made extinct before anyone knew they were there, as a species anyway.

Michael Smith
06-09-2014, 04:48 AM
You'll have to check the CITES appendices to see if your particular species of rosewood is listed.
Thanks for that Chuck. The problem is I don't really know what species of rosewood it is. I bought it about 6 months ago. They told me it was from Peru so I believed at the time I was good. It looked very much like Brazilian but they said it was from Peru. I went back to get some more last month and they say they are having a hard time getting more and their rack was empty, which worries me a bit.

resoman
06-09-2014, 06:30 AM
Some of the suppliers on ebay still have BRW for sale. Can't figure how that is.

Steveperrywriter
06-09-2014, 08:10 AM
Some of the suppliers on ebay still have BRW for sale. Can't figure how that is.

Maybe they have a paper trail showing it came from an old tree stump or church door that predates the ban. Or maybe it's one of those Australian look-alikes that's so close nobody can tell the difference. And the ruling doesn't take effect for a few weeks, if I read the article correctly. Of course, reading legal jargon is not my forte ...

coolkayaker1
06-09-2014, 09:37 AM
Weird that it's fine to build with mammoth tusk fossils and petrified redwoods, but try making fret dots with repurposed piano-key ivory from an elephant dead a century ago, tsk tsk. Kiss the wife and kids: time for a long nap in a Federal clink.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
06-09-2014, 11:02 AM
On elephant ivory, it is my understanding (through Duck of pearl) that accepting any money for working on any pre ban/antique ivory negates that ivories antique pre ban status- it is now 'new'.

This means that you cant accept money for doing a nut job/setup on a guitar from, say, 1880 without making it illegal.

I think using salvaged piano ivory keys is a decent way to honor an animal that should never have been killed- it is all horrible yes, but to keep such salvaged ivory keys in a box in draw and never used is a true crime.
NOTE- When I have used it in the past, i used it free of charge- Charging extra for using it is adding to the poaching problem.

saltytri
07-15-2014, 05:18 PM
An earlier post in this thread asked how the authorities can tell what is what. Here's the answer.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Forensics Laboratory is a few blocks from my house. It's the only lab of its kind in the world and has done some really amazing work in support of prosecutions for violation of wildlife laws. CITES is within the lab's bailiwick. This spot ran today on a local news channel:

http://www.kdrv.com/forensics-lab-takes-on-wood-smuggling/

Check out the nice BZ guitar back.

I wasn't thinking of violating the rules but since the pros just down the street have figured out how to identify listed species, I think it might be a good idea to avoid the questionable stuff!

And yes, Chuck, distinguishing mammoth ivory from elephant ivory is child's play for these guys.

Steveperrywriter
07-15-2014, 06:06 PM
An earlier post in this thread asked how the authorities can tell what is what. Here's the answer.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Forensics Laboratory is a few blocks from my house. It's the only lab of its kind in the world and has done some really amazing work in support of prosecutions for violation of wildlife laws. CITES is within the lab's bailiwick. This spot ran today on a local news channel:

http://www.kdrv.com/forensics-lab-takes-on-wood-smuggling/

Check out the nice BZ guitar back.

I wasn't thinking of violating the rules but since the pros just down the street have figured out how to identify listed species, I think it might be a good idea to avoid the questionable stuff!

And yes, Chuck, distinguishing mammoth ivory from elephant ivory is child's play for these guys.


If this is the only lab of its kind, maybe they will be backed up pretty quickly ...

Michael Smith
07-15-2014, 08:30 PM
An earlier post in this thread asked how the authorities can tell what is what. Here's the answer.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Forensics Laboratory is a few blocks from my house. It's the only lab of its kind in the world and has done some really amazing work in support of prosecutions for violation of wildlife laws. CITES is within the lab's bailiwick. This spot ran today on a local news channel:

http://www.kdrv.com/forensics-lab-takes-on-wood-smuggling/

Check out the nice BZ guitar back.

I wasn't thinking of violating the rules but since the pros just down the street have figured out how to identify listed species, I think it might be a good idea to avoid the questionable stuff!

And yes, Chuck, distinguishing mammoth ivory from elephant ivory is child's play for these guys.

So you are saying that they can look at a mammoth dot and tell it isn't elephant. Only after they ship your uke back to wherever and leave it sitting on a shelf for 6 months. Better keep the paperwork handy. If they are such wiz kids at this lab why not just say any elephant Ivory taking in the last 10 years.

The Big Kahuna
07-15-2014, 08:55 PM
I think using salvaged piano ivory keys is a decent way to honor an animal that should never have been killed- it is all horrible yes, but to keep such salvaged ivory keys in a box in draw and never used is a true crime.

You know, I think this is the first time I've ever disagreed with you. Which surprised the crap out of me when you consider you're Australian, and therefore racially predisposed to be wrong on any subject.

Anyway, I look at it the same way as fur. If you buy a fur coat second-hand, it's still wrong. You aren't honouring the animal that was killed, merely perpetuating a crime. Using ivory piano keys to make bridge saddles, nuts and dot markers is no different to using a tigerskin rug to line your ukulele case. I could also have made the same point about jewellery made from gold that the nazis harvested from...well, you know what I'm saying.

Wrong is wrong, and any ivory that reaches the market in any form should be destroyed.

The Big Kahuna
07-15-2014, 09:09 PM
Fur coats should also be burned, preferably whilst still being worn.

:2cents:

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
07-16-2014, 04:17 AM
You know, I think this is the first time I've ever disagreed with you. Which surprised the crap out of me when you consider you're Australian, and therefore racially predisposed to be wrong on any subject.

Anyway, I look at it the same way as fur. If you buy a fur coat second-hand, it's still wrong. You aren't honouring the animal that was killed, merely perpetuating a crime. Using ivory piano keys to make bridge saddles, nuts and dot markers is no different to using a tigerskin rug to line your ukulele case. I could also have made the same point about jewellery made from gold that the nazis harvested from...well, you know what I'm saying.

Wrong is wrong, and any ivory that reaches the market in any form should be destroyed.

HAhahhaha- Yes being an Ozzy has its problems with the ability to apply logic to some things.

Your probably right on the ivory and fur thing- I wish there weren't even little bit of it to use like old piano keys. I guess my point of view comes from being at at Gilet Guitars for 10 and seeing this 12" x 2" box full of old salvaged ivory keys just sitting there for all that time and no one ever touched it- I hate to waste stuff- i keep everything big enough to make a heel cap. So after 10 years of frustration I suppose my attitude altered in regard to just doing the best with what was in that box. I only used about 3 engraved heel caps .

Fur coats.... I was in Aspen in Jan (I got married) and alot of people walk around in obviously very new very expensive fur coats and that really angers me- That is a status thing, and needless new killing for something other then food.
2nd hand fur stuff from an antique shop. I don't mind that but I would never wear it out.

Using up some salvaged ivory keys aint a status thing and it isn't a new killing thing. Still, its good to take a total blanket stand on the matter like you have :)

Its all trying to make the best of a bad situation...

Peace

The Big Kahuna
07-16-2014, 07:43 AM
Aah, we're all good Bruce. No cause for you to come crawling on your hands and knees, begging for forgiveness and crying like a great big girl. You're still my mate, even though you are a great big antipodean ass-composer.

:p


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_f_p0CgPeyA

Bruce Sexauer
07-16-2014, 09:35 AM
What's this, then? You know, I thought I'd say something on the title subject, but there's no way I'm participating in this thread at this point!

The Big Kahuna
07-16-2014, 09:54 AM
What's this, then? You know, I thought I'd say something on the title subject, but there's no way I'm participating in this thread at this point!

I assume you realise that the "Bruce" in my last post doesn't in any way refer to you? It's an English/Australian in-joke. :)

Apologies if your post was made in fun, it's not always possible to tell when you chaps are kidding. ;)

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
07-16-2014, 10:34 AM
hahahahha- ive never seen that Monty Python!

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
07-16-2014, 10:40 AM
The really funny thing is that John Cleese owns and stays at a house in Whale beach, about 20 mins drive from my place in Sydney.

Spike Milligan used to live just north of Sydney too.

Rule #6 !

Steveperrywriter
07-16-2014, 01:15 PM
Interesting where we draw our lines. I wouldn't have Jumbo die for my sins, I'm good with Tusq. And fake fur rather than a coat from a 101 Dalmatians; but what about Braz? Would you destroy instruments made of it because it's endangered? Or those with bone nuts and saddles? It is only the cute animals that should be spared? Is mother-of-pearl okay?

Blood diamonds, no. But do you know where the gold in your wedding ring came from? Once it is melted down, it all looks the same.

How is elephant ivory from a hundred year old piano key morally different from a ten thousand year old mastadon's?

Gets to be a tricky road, once you start defining what "wrong" is.

According to whom?

DPO
07-16-2014, 04:41 PM
You know, I think this is the first time I've ever disagreed with you. Which surprised the crap out of me when you consider you're Australian, and therefore racially predisposed to be wrong on any subject.

Anyway, I look at it the same way as fur. If you buy a fur coat second-hand, it's still wrong. You aren't honouring the animal that was killed, merely perpetuating a crime. Using ivory piano keys to make bridge saddles, nuts and dot markers is no different to using a tigerskin rug to line your ukulele case. I could also have made the same point about jewellery made from gold that the nazis harvested from...well, you know what I'm saying.

Wrong is wrong, and any ivory that reaches the market in any form should be destroyed.

So on that basis, should we destroy all the old Steinway pianos that have ivory keys? How about listening to a piano concerto played by a concert pianist ON a Steinway? Is that ok or not. The stall is open and the horse has bolted.

Bruce Sexauer
07-18-2014, 08:13 AM
I assume you realise that the "Bruce" in my last post doesn't in any way refer to you? It's an English/Australian in-joke. :)

Apologies if your post was made in fun, it's not always possible to tell when you chaps are kidding. ;)

I haven't found the emoticon for "dry", not that I'd use it if I did.

In surprising case that I am too subtle for a brit; I'm good, thank you. I HAVE been to Oz, and I found it good.

The Big Kahuna
07-18-2014, 10:19 AM
too subtle for a brit

Yeah, totally didn't see that coming :o

Bruce Sexauer
07-18-2014, 08:15 PM
Yeah, totally didn't see that coming :o

Well awlraght, then.

I love BRW as a guitar making timber, and I have built many dozens from it. Also, I have invested in enough of the wood to build many dozens more. I know where all but a couple of sets came from and how they got from Brazil to my shop, and the story is all good. But documentation is not something I ever considered for a moment. At 67 I am a mature builder, and using this ultimate material pretty much steadily through my retirement has been my plan. This latest development is the proverbial wrench in the works for me, and also for many of my peers, as BRW seemed like a smart investment following the "buy what you know" philosophy. I expect I am going to stay with my original plan since I don't have a lot of other options at this point. It is still legal to build them, and where there is a will there is a way, I'm told.

For me the comparison between elephants and trees, especially trees that were cut before a problem was perceived, is a non- starter. I will not trade in ivory, and have had that position for at least twenty years.

Steveperrywriter
07-19-2014, 06:38 AM
I don't think dead elephant=tree! either. I was being specious to make a point; however, the OP's have raised a good question: what do you do with extant antiques? Should selling your grammy's old piano be illegal? Do we toss put the parlor guitars with ivory tuning buttons? (Or if you are a literary fan, do we lose Twain's work because Huck Finn has the n-word in it?)

Or history is full of things that used to be considered okay, but aren't now. How do you decide?

It is one thing not to use endangered critters in your current work, or to buy something questionable, but another thing to toss or destroy a piece of art that might be hundreds of years old. I am just curious as to how folks make that determination.

hawaii 50
07-19-2014, 06:56 AM
I started this thread and was just trying to understand who gets in trouble(goes to jail..:))

I do not own any kind of animal fur ,antiques that are worth any kind of money a grand piano with ivory keys etc.. or any old Martin Guitars built in the Day with B/R..
although I understand why they did ban the selling of B/R

but I can afford some NEW Ukuleles that I plan to keep and pass on when I am done playing...and I do not have a Brazilian Rosewood one...but I have many other combinations of tone wood ukes that I can enjoy and afford....

so my main question was kind of like...who goes to jail(as this now a felony?) if somehow you get caught with an illegal new B/R instrument in you possession..
and I am totally confused on how the buyer will get caught....

not sure how the buyer can have the bad luck of being caught....correct paperwork or no paperwork?