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jjdejd
06-13-2014, 06:34 AM
Looking at buying a uke that has strap buttons on the rear and where the neck attaches to the body. How much work is it to remove and repair? It's a KoAloha uke. Any idea on the cost to do this ? Thanks.

Manalishi
06-13-2014, 07:03 AM
Most strap buttons have a screw down the centre,unless they are the
solid plastic type? Once the screws are removed,you would be left with
just a couple of screw holes.Easy and cheap to fill,but very difficult to
make the repair 'invisible'!

iamesperambient
06-13-2014, 07:08 AM
Most strap buttons have a screw down the centre,unless they are the
solid plastic type? Once the screws are removed,you would be left with
just a couple of screw holes.Easy and cheap to fill,but very difficult to
make the repair 'invisible'!

does anyone know how i would go about adding a strap button to my uke which does not have one? should i take it to a music store and ask if they can add one one for me in fact id prefer two if possible.

Icelander53
06-13-2014, 07:30 AM
I've added them myself and also had them done. Cheap and easy yourself.

SailingUke
06-13-2014, 07:33 AM
does anyone know how i would go about adding a strap button to my uke which does not have one? should i take it to a music store and ask if they can add one one for me in fact id prefer two if possible.

From a failed campaign of the past "Drill Baby, Drill".

Dane
06-13-2014, 09:03 AM
does anyone know how i would go about adding a strap button to my uke which does not have one? should i take it to a music store and ask if they can add one one for me in fact id prefer two if possible.

If you're not experienced with a drill, I do not recommend it. You could chip or crack the finish and wood around the hole if you don't do it right. If it doesn't cost but a few bucks, I'd have it done at a music shop. I've done a few myself, there is definitely a right and wrong way to do it.

Telperion
06-13-2014, 09:40 AM
Looking at buying a uke that has strap buttons on the rear and where the neck attaches to the body. How much work is it to remove and repair? It's a KoAloha uke. Any idea on the cost to do this ? Thanks.

In my opinion, I would not try to remove existing strap buttons and backfill. I can handle wear and tear on my instruments, but personally, I don't like patch jobs, unless it's a vintage instrument with necessary structural repairs. Unless you are just getting an absolute killer deal on the KoAloha, I'd pass and wait for one without buttons. They come up for re-sale frequently, and often at very good prices. Again, this is just my opinion, and I am very particular, so maybe it wouldn't bother you at all. However, at least consider whether you will ever want to re-sell. I think a uke with strap buttons would probably be more attractive at resale than one with filled holes.

Good luck with your decision!

-Steve

wildfire070
06-13-2014, 09:47 AM
I've had strap buttons installed on my ukes at my local store. $5 for the strap button and install. After the first couple of times, I got to talking with the people there...really nice bunch. And the last time i was there they didn't charge me at all as long as I promised to come back and play something for their open mic night.

mds725
06-13-2014, 09:51 AM
does anyone know how i would go about adding a strap button to my uke which does not have one? should i take it to a music store and ask if they can add one one for me in fact id prefer two if possible.

Do you realize that you just hijacked the OP's thread? Now, instead of answering the OP's question about plugging up a hole left by a strap button, people participating in this thread are answering your completely different question. Next time, please start your own thread.

Telperion
06-13-2014, 09:53 AM
Do you realize that you just hijacked the OP's thread?

Was thinking the same thing. I tried to get it back on track with a pertinent response, though.

-Steve

jjdejd
06-13-2014, 10:02 AM
In my opinion, I would not try to remove existing strap buttons and backfill. I can handle wear and tear on my instruments, but personally, I don't like patch jobs, unless it's a vintage instrument with necessary structural repairs. Unless you are just getting an absolute killer deal on the KoAloha, I'd pass and wait for one without buttons. They come up for re-sale frequently, and often at very good prices. Again, this is just my opinion, and I am very particular, so maybe it wouldn't bother you at all. However, at least consider whether you will ever want to re-sell. I think a uke with strap buttons would probably be more attractive at resale than one with filled holes.

Good luck with your decision!



-Steve


Think I'll pass on this one. Thanks for the info.

kypfer
06-13-2014, 12:19 PM
strap buttons on the rear and where the neck attaches to the body. How much work is it to remove and repair? ... my way of dealing with this type of problem is to simply unscrew the offending item then plug the holes with beeswax. Beeswax is very neutral in colour and slightly translucent, so blends well with anything, from light maple to the black wood of my clarinet (I removed a thumbrest). The beeswax is totally inactive and will leave no residue if polished off.
In the event of a re-sale, point out the "problem" and supply the removed fittings, should the purchaser wish to re-use them.
I feel an easily reversible repair that is a bit visible is far superior to a messed-up repair that is very visible! Effecting a good colour and grain match in a repair like this is a highly skilled job, and not always successful.
Another alternative may be the insertion of a decorative "feature", a piece of "mother-of-pearl" for instance, in the wood to mask the previous hole. I've seen small coins used for this on occaision, but beauty is in the eye of the beholder and what you feel to be stylish, cool, or whatever may not appeal to a potential subsequent owner.

kohanmike
06-13-2014, 08:10 PM
Interesting in that I just finished installing strap buttons on all four of my ukes, I add them to all my ukes. I like the idea that if you take them off, fill the holes with bees wax so if you sell it, the buttons can easily be added back if the next person wants them.

Telperion
06-14-2014, 02:25 AM
... I feel an easily reversible repair that is a bit visible is far superior to a messed-up repair that is very visible!

All very good advice, Kypfer. Beeswax is good stuff, and a lot of people will actually use a little beeswax on the strap button screw as a thread lubricant anyway. I totally agree about making sure that the repair is reversible.

-Steve

OldePhart
06-14-2014, 02:46 AM
does anyone know how i would go about adding a strap button to my uke which does not have one? should i take it to a music store and ask if they can add one one for me in fact id prefer two if possible.

If you have a good store that is always an option. However, it is not difficult to do yourself if you are patient. If you have the manual dexterity to play, you have the manual dexterity to install a strap button...all you need is the knowledge of how to do it properly.

First, never just screw the mounting screw into the wood. You must drill a small pilot hole that is a little smaller than the screw - otherwise you risk cracking the wood...especially when putting one in the neck.

So...find a bit that is a little narrower than the screw - approximately the same diameter as the "inside" part of the threads is good. Measure how much of the screw extends beyond the button when the screw is seated in the end of the button. Wrap a piece of tape around the drill bit at that point so you know where to stop drilling. Put a piece of painter's tape over the uke where you are going to drill, and then mark on the tape where you want the button. The wood isn't likely to chip with the small hole you will be drilling, but the painter's tape will make it even less likely, plus it helps keep the bit from slipping when you first start the hole. Even if you do get a tiny chip (I never have) it will be covered by the button, anyway. Drill your pilot hole, remove the tape, and screw the button on.

If it is very hard to drive the screw in...stop! Back the screw out, get the next size larger bit, drill the hole out, and then screw the button on. Any time that it is very hard to drive a screw into wood you are very likely to crack the wood. There should definitely be some resistance to turning the screw...but if you have to "horse on it" then you haven't drilled the pilot hole large enough (or deep enough, if you get well into and it suddenly tightens up before the screw is "bedded" in the button).

All in all, quicker to do than to write about!

John

OldePhart
06-14-2014, 02:52 AM
Looking at buying a uke that has strap buttons on the rear and where the neck attaches to the body. How much work is it to remove and repair? It's a KoAloha uke. Any idea on the cost to do this ? Thanks.

Why would you bother removing them? Unless they have been installed very sloppy, just leaving them in doesn't hurt anything even if you don't plan to use them.

Removing them is actually more likely to leave more of an unsightly mess than just leaving them on. So, if it's a visual thing, you don't like the fact that the uke has been modified, just pass on it because you will never be happy with the repair, either.

Just my $0.02. :)

John

OldePhart
06-14-2014, 02:55 AM
... my way of dealing with this type of problem is to simply unscrew the offending item then plug the holes with beeswax.
I think I'm going to use that on the tuner mounting screw holes on a couple of ukes where I've installed UPTs in place of "ears." The small holes in the back of the headstock don't really bother me, but this is a good idea to make them do so even less. LOL


John

kohanmike
06-14-2014, 11:50 AM
I actually drill a small hole first, then match up a drill bit to the screw and drill that hole larger.