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Ukejenny
06-18-2014, 01:30 PM
This short video does a great job of explaining how the pitch and rhythm works on a musical staff. Very well done.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZN41d7Txcq0#t=250

ukegirl
06-18-2014, 02:29 PM
Thanks for sharing!

itsme
06-18-2014, 03:02 PM
As someone who's been reading music most of my life, I found it a bit simplistic, but pretty accurate and a decent introduction, although the comparison between Beethoven and (Justin) Bieber kinda made me roll my eyes.

The only qualm I have is when they talked about bar lines and how the space between the bar lines was called a bar. Sounds more like how a blues musician or rocker would refer to it. In classical training, it is generally referred to as a measure. :o

CeeJay
06-18-2014, 03:39 PM
As someone who's been reading music most of my life, I found it a bit simplistic, but pretty accurate and a decent introduction, although the comparison between Beethoven and (Justin) Bieber kinda made me roll my eyes.

The only qualm I have is when they talked about bar lines and how the space between the bar lines was called a bar. Sounds more like how a blues musician or rocker would refer to it. In classical training, it is generally referred to as a measure. :o

...and that's the difference between the classically trained and the blues musoes and rockers ......the blues players and rockers know they have to get to the bar to get a measure ...or a double measure ...or any kind of drink !!

Come on itsme ...work with me on this....

iamesperambient
06-18-2014, 06:36 PM
As someone who's been reading music most of my life, I found it a bit simplistic, but pretty accurate and a decent introduction, although the comparison between Beethoven and (Justin) Bieber kinda made me roll my eyes.

The only qualm I have is when they talked about bar lines and how the space between the bar lines was called a bar. Sounds more like how a blues musician or rocker would refer to it. In classical training, it is generally referred to as a measure. :o

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcTLJ692F70

lolz watch this than! you will die!

Ukejenny
06-19-2014, 06:51 AM
As someone who's been reading music most of my life, I found it a bit simplistic, but pretty accurate and a decent introduction, although the comparison between Beethoven and (Justin) Bieber kinda made me roll my eyes.

The only qualm I have is when they talked about bar lines and how the space between the bar lines was called a bar. Sounds more like how a blues musician or rocker would refer to it. In classical training, it is generally referred to as a measure. :o

That is one of the things I felt was good about the video. The information isn't given from the perspective of someone classically trained. I have a degree in music education and find that, sometimes, my background actually makes it more confusing to people who want to know the facts, especially if I go off on a tangent.

CeeJay
06-20-2014, 02:26 PM
That is one of the things I felt was good about the video. The information isn't given from the perspective of someone classically trained. I have a degree in music education and find that, sometimes, my background actually makes it more confusing to people who want to know the facts, especially if I go off on a tangent.

....just watched the fillum ...makes sense to me and I read stave as well...

@itsme ...well it would be simplistic it is aimed at those who do not read stave and are probably too embarrassed to ask how because they may run into an intellectual giant who could read it from the womb.

Sorry, to butt in on your very nice and polite thread in this manner UkeJenny but us Blues /Rockers have an opinion too ...we generally keep it on the down-low though........ however there is a limit (:rolleyes:)

kypfer
06-20-2014, 09:21 PM
when they talked about bar lines and how the space between the bar lines was called a bar. Sounds more like how a blues musician or rocker would refer to it. In classical training, it is generally referred to as a measure. ... I wonder if this is a geographical thing rather than to do with a genre of music. The narrator in the video would seem to not be from the Americas. Sounds rather more English, with perhaps a hint of Australia or New Zealand in the accent. I'd always known this to be a bar until relatively recently. I actually had to use an on-line search to ensure I was understanding the use of the term measure correctly :)

Tootler
06-21-2014, 05:38 AM
As someone who's been reading music most of my life, I found it a bit simplistic, but pretty accurate and a decent introduction, although the comparison between Beethoven and (Justin) Bieber kinda made me roll my eyes.

The only qualm I have is when they talked about bar lines and how the space between the bar lines was called a bar. Sounds more like how a blues musician or rocker would refer to it. In classical training, it is generally referred to as a measure. :o

Over here in the UK we call it a bar, whatever the genre of music. I play quite a lot of classical music on the recorder and I can assure you we call the space between the bar lines a bar. We also have different names for the little tadpole shapes that fill the bars and for some of the intervals the lines and spaces represent.

Edit to add that although standard musical notation is international there are differences in terminology in different countries. This was something I discovered a few years back when I started joining music music forums on the internet.

Ukejenny
06-21-2014, 06:09 AM
....just watched the fillum ...makes sense to me and I read stave as well...

@itsme ...well it would be simplistic it is aimed at those who do not read stave and are probably too embarrassed to ask how because they may run into an intellectual giant who could read it from the womb.

Sorry, to butt in on your very nice and polite thread in this manner UkeJenny but us Blues /Rockers have an opinion too ...we generally keep it on the down-low though........ however there is a limit (:rolleyes:)

No worries! I was talking to a Facebook friend yesterday and we were discussing how people who play by ear can have some kind of mental block in learning to read notation, and likewise, people who read notation can have a block when trying to learn to play by ear. Two different parts of the brain, but if we can relax and keep an open mind, it can happen. Same kind of thing with notation versus tab.