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View Full Version : Ever encountered guitarists who are snobby towards the uke?



Andy Chen
06-23-2014, 10:19 PM
And what do you say to them?

iamesperambient
06-23-2014, 10:22 PM
And what do you say to them?

I tell them to listen to jake or kimo hussey and than they will realize its a serious instrument.
I also play jazz for them and usually their impressed (i practice jazz pieces over and over and over
and over and over all day until i get it). I explain to them its just as difficult and rewarding to play as guitar
i also tell them bigger ukes baritone and tenor are very serious instruments. (even soprano/concert can be also).

Guitarist do seem to be negative towards anything that isn't a guitar or bass or drums pretty bog standard mindset
i love the uke because its the little underdog of the stringed instruments and honestly i just like how it sounds better
than guitar!

therinkydinktink
06-23-2014, 10:23 PM
I tell them they're like the guys who drive Ferraris and Lamborghinis, they're over compensating for something ;)

Andy Chen
06-23-2014, 10:24 PM
I tell them they're like the guys who drive Ferraris and Lamborghinis, they're over compensating for something ;)

I love this!

Booli
06-23-2014, 10:30 PM
And what do you say to them?

I get this all the time. How I respond depends on what they say exactly and tone of voice....

One fantasy of mine is to act like this (which I've not done YET...)

They pejoratively jab at me with 'Hey man is that a kiddie gee-tar, and did you know you are missing 2 strings - ha ha!'

At which point I blast into the opening movement of 'Tocatta's Fuge In D' ala Tamaine Gardner style in full fury and I get all up in their face like Gene Simmons from KISS, and say 'how to you like me know?' give them the shaka sign, and make a quick exit before they ask me to 'play more like that' (I only know the first 8 bars or so of that song)...

feel free to substitute 'Flight of the Bumble Bee' or 'William Tell Overture' or 'Malaguen~a' played at 168bpm or faster......

:)

therinkydinktink
06-23-2014, 10:31 PM
I love this!

:) Feel free to use it if they bother you Chief!

iamesperambient
06-23-2014, 10:58 PM
I get this all the time. How I respond depends on what they say exactly and tone of voice....

One fantasy of mine is to act like this (which I've not done YET...)

They pejoratively jab at me with 'Hey man is that a kiddie gee-tar, and did you know you are missing 2 strings - ha ha!'

At which point I blast into the opening movement of 'Tocatta's Fuge In D' ala Tamaine Gardner style in full fury and I get all up in their face like Gene Simmons from KISS, and say 'how to you like me know?' give them the shaka sign, and make a quick exit before they ask me to 'play more like that' (I only know the first 8 bars or so of that song)...

feel free to substitute 'Flight of the Bumble Bee' or 'William Tell Overture' or 'Malaguen~a' played at 168bpm or faster......

:)



nice my chinese housemate walked in on me in the livign room playing my soprano and goes 'ooohhhh awww it's soooo cute its so little how do you play it"
hahaha. Thats cool because he was interested. than another housemate who moved out from turkey said 'is that a mini guitar its hilarious' at that point those
kind of comments make me want flip out, but instead i responded snidely (yep its a mini guitar got shrunk in the wash). F-ing a-holes

Andy Chen
06-23-2014, 11:09 PM
An otherwise nice guy told me once he doesn't think singers who accompany themselves on the uke are musicians. Such a line of thinking completely baffles me.

CeeJay
06-23-2014, 11:14 PM
What's up with soprano and concerts then ? LOL....

I play all sorts on my newly strung 15 soprano.....even Russian Folk Music like Kalinka, Ochechonye etc.....:music:

RAB11
06-23-2014, 11:58 PM
i also tell them bigger ukes baritone and tenor are very serious instruments. (even soprano/concert can be also).



See this is exactly the same mindset as snobby guitarists to me.

PhilUSAFRet
06-24-2014, 12:08 AM
An otherwise nice guy told me once he doesn't think singers who accompany themselves on the uke are musicians. Such a line of thinking completely baffles me.

There's a hell of a lot of guitarists/singers who I don't think are musicians either. If possible, I send them a Jake, or a James Hill, or other impressive YouTube video, depending on their music preference. That usually does it. If not, they are just "A-holes" who want to drag you down to their level so they can beat you with experience.

tbeltrans
06-24-2014, 12:38 AM
I tell them to listen to jake or kimo hussey and than they will realize its a serious instrument.
I also play jazz for them and usually their impressed (i practice jazz pieces over and over and over
and over and over all day until i get it). I explain to them its just as difficult and rewarding to play as guitar
i also tell them bigger ukes baritone and tenor are very serious instruments. (even soprano/concert can be also).

Guitarist do seem to be negative towards anything that isn't a guitar or bass or drums pretty bog standard mindset
i love the uke because its the little underdog of the stringed instruments and honestly i just like how it sounds better
than guitar!

I am quoting this post only as a clear example of what I am responding to, but am really responding to those who lump all guitarists into the same bucket. As in any thread some people will make it sound as if all guitarists fit the description the OP is complaining about, while others understand that not all guitarist fit this description.

Remember that there are many guitar players who also appreciate and play ukulele right here in these forums. So rather than "Guitarists do seem to be negative..", maybe broaden the thinking in this thread to SOME guitarists. Wherever people are involved in anything, there will be snobbery AND acceptance/embracing of the idea or activity, depending on the person.

Tony

peanuts56
06-24-2014, 01:11 AM
Most associate the uke as a toy. I've shown several musician friends videos of Jake and they almost always stand there shaking their heads in disbelief. Any video of Jake, Brittani Paiva James Hill or Lyle Ritz etc usually does the trick. I'm sure many think the harmonica is a toy or a joke too. One listen to Toots Thielman or Stevie Wonder usually dispels that myth. It's not the instrument, it's the person playing it.

Wicked
06-24-2014, 01:45 AM
As a long-time guitarist myself, I never really gave the ukulele much thought (negative or positive) until I played one for the first time. I have never had a truly talented guitarist make any negative comments to me about the ukulele. Those types of comments tend to come from mediocre (at best) players - in which case, they cannot keep up with me on either four or six strings, so the issue is put to rest rather dramatically.

I now find that I get more requests from other musicians to bust out the ukulele. It tends to add a little extra something to the vast sea of guitars.

OldePhart
06-24-2014, 02:04 AM
Remember that there are many guitar players who also appreciate and play ukulele right here in these forums. So rather than "Guitarists do seem to be negative..", maybe broaden the thinking in this thread to SOME guitarists. Wherever people are involved in anything, there will be snobbery AND acceptance/embracing of the idea or activity, depending on the person.

Tony

As a guitar player myself I know where you're coming from, but I think there really is a mindset that is very common among guitarists that you just don't find with players of most other instruments. I think maybe it's because there are so many juveniles attracted to guitar who think they are hot stuff because they can chunk out some easy power chords. Not saying that's all guitarists, by any means, but you're just far more likely to run into the "unearned prima donna attitude" from guitarists than probably any other group.

John

Wicked
06-24-2014, 02:20 AM
... you're just far more likely to run into the "unearned prima donna attitude" from guitarists than probably any other group.

Absolutely true.

KnowsPickin
06-24-2014, 02:31 AM
you're just far more likely to run into the "unearned prima donna attitude" from guitarists than probably any other group.

John

How many guitarists does it take to change a light bulb? Only one. He holds on to it and the world revolves around him. :-)

Jon Moody
06-24-2014, 02:41 AM
And what do you say to them?

Absolutely nothing. I've got nothing to prove to anyone in terms of skill level or validation of the instruments I play (and for reference, I get a lot more snide comments when I pull out my 6 string bass over a ukulele). It's too bad that fellow musicians can't appreciate passion and playing on any instrument, regardless of stigma.

RichM
06-24-2014, 02:52 AM
Absolutely nothing. I've got nothing to prove to anyone in terms of skill level or validation of the instruments I play (and for reference, I get a lot more snide comments when I pull out my 6 string bass over a ukulele). It's too bad that fellow musicians can't appreciate passion and playing on any instrument, regardless of stigma.

Well said. Why in the world would we exert effort to justify our choices to selfish jerks? Play music and smile.

PhilUSAFRet
06-24-2014, 03:24 AM
"Real musicians" have nothing to defend and wouldn't get involved in this kind of philosophical debate, just wannabe's.

kvehe
06-24-2014, 03:43 AM
This line certainly isn't original with me, but I did use it once to good effect:

My brother's father-in-law, John, started taking guitar lessons when he was in his early 80's, which is definitely to his credit. I took my Griffin Pinecone uke to a family party once (to play Happy Birthday for my mother - see profile picture!), and John asked to see it. He took it outside, and when he came back in and returned it to me he made a big, big deal about how it was so completely out of tune, and how could I possibly play it like that, blah blah blah, and how he had tuned it for me. Of course, it had been absolutely in tune, but John knew soooooooo much more than I did........ I explained uke tuning, and put it back the way it belonged. John then said (having been put in his place, I guess) that it must be a pretty easy instrument to play, having only four strings. I said, "so does a violin".

He hasn't said one word about it since. :D

Edgeguy
06-24-2014, 04:12 AM
I guess I am one of the few guitarists that was not snobbish about the Uke. In fact my first real experience with them was at a bluegrass guitar camp. They had a uke class taught by Jerry Canote. A friend of mine had an extra uke and he loaned it to me for the week, and in a year I have two ukes and am drooling for a banjolele.

If you really think about it a bluegrass guitar player could be one of the more snobbish towards a uke, because the uke does not have that base sound used in rhythm and it is not loud enough for jams. Well thanks to this camp not having this attitude I was able to try a class out, and I just love it. Oh and the camp now books a uke instructer as a regular. We had Marcy Maxer this year and she was a treat.

Also in our weekly jam we play by the jam rule that you do not play louder than the person doing lead. So when the uke plays lead everbody quiets down a little more, and we have really enjoyed those breaks. I can't imagine our jam without a uke.

Rllink
06-24-2014, 04:21 AM
I've not been around guitarists enough for them to say anything to me about my ukulele. Last summer a friend that I had not seen for a while told me that he had taken up playing the guitar. I told him that I had been thinking of taking up the guitar as well, as my daughter has a guitar and it has been sitting in my basement for years. Anyway, I hung around with my friend a little and we would go around to music stores and talk to other guitarists, and they all seemed to take it and themselves so serious. I am not a serious person. My intensity level doesn't get real high and I got turned off of the guitar before I even started. But then I discovered the ukulele.

I don't want any of my new found ukulele friends to take this the wrong way. I think it is great if someone is serious about the uke, but I'm not. I'm all about sitting back and strumming away. To me, if someone came up to me and got all righteous because they are a guitar player and I play the uke, I think I would just simply ask them to go away and leave me alone, that I don't have time for that kind of attitude. I actually use that line a lot, in a lot of other settings. I guess I'm just a pacifist in that way. I don't confront obnoxious people, I just avoid them. I've been know to just turn around and walk away from people while they are still talking.

Cornfield
06-24-2014, 04:22 AM
Some guitarists look down on other guitarists because of the brand or style of guitar. I did an open mic once and a folky hotshot with a dreadnaught made a snide remark about me using a "Parlor Guitar" till he saw that it was Martin 0-28VS.
Gear snobs are gear snobs. There does not seem to be a correlation between skill and snobbery.
If someone makes a nasty comment about my gear (or anything else) I have to consider "If this is the worst thing that happens to me today, I'm pretty grateful."

Steedy
06-24-2014, 04:44 AM
And what do you say to them?

Nothing, I don't talk to guitarists.




;)

Wicked
06-24-2014, 04:50 AM
If you really think about it a bluegrass guitar player could be one of the more snobbish towards a uke...

I never quite understood the seething snobbishness in the Bluegrass community regarding "proper" instruments - especially considering the origins of the style are anything but elitist. One of those mysteries of life, I guess.


Gear snobs are gear snobs. There does not seem to be a correlation between skill and snobbery.

There is a correlation... it just happens to be inversely proportional.

Icelander53
06-24-2014, 05:09 AM
And what do you say to them?

No I haven't but if I did I'd let my fists do the talking. :old:

Icelander53
06-24-2014, 05:17 AM
I've not been around guitarists enough for them to say anything to me about my ukulele. Last summer a friend that I had not seen for a while told me that he had taken up playing the guitar. I told him that I had been thinking of taking up the guitar as well, as my daughter has a guitar and it has been sitting in my basement for years. Anyway, I hung around with my friend a little and we would go around to music stores and talk to other guitarists, and they all seemed to take it and themselves so serious. I am not a serious person. My intensity level doesn't get real high and I got turned off of the guitar before I even started. But then I discovered the ukulele.

I don't want any of my new found ukulele friends to take this the wrong way. I think it is great if someone is serious about the uke, but I'm not. I'm all about sitting back and strumming away. To me, if someone came up to me and got all righteous because they are a guitar player and I play the uke, I think I would just simply ask them to go away and leave me alone, that I don't have time for that kind of attitude. I actually use that line a lot, in a lot of other settings. I guess I'm just a pacifist in that way. I don't confront obnoxious people, I just avoid them. I've been know to just turn around and walk away from people while they are still talking.

You sir are a wise guy.:)

CeeJay
06-24-2014, 05:23 AM
I never quite understood the seething snobbishness in the Bluegrass community regarding "proper" instruments - especially considering the origins of the style are anything but elitist. One of those mysteries of life, I guess.



There is a correlation... it just happens to be inversely proportional.

The first statement I love it ...it what made me deep six Banjohangout , Bluegrass , Earl Scruggs style and the associated
other claptrap....I love my 5 string banjo, I play it how I want to.......it works for me......and the uke and banjo complement each other too, as they are the only two re-entrant tuned instruments I know of . Some Guitarists scoff at banjos as well .....I tell you banjos are one of the music worlds best kept secrets......

oh and I know my way round a piano accordion as well...Jambalaya anyone ?..I do play some anti-social instruments ..just need some bagpipes
and I got the set !!

Right I'll get me coat .........

YogenFruz
06-24-2014, 05:52 AM
Some guy was being a huge ass in store and telling me that uke wasn't a real instrument, that I should learn guitar and that uke players weren't real musicians. I think he was trying to impress the lady he was with, and was playing some rendition of PianoMan on the piano. I only started a few months ago and couldn't let him have it on the uke, so I sat down at the piano and played the first 52 bars of Chopin's Winter Wind. link (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBbGVpGNVSA) and told him that anyone can make music, and to stop being a dick. He left in embarrassed haste.

actadh
06-24-2014, 06:31 AM
I think my music store experiences have been somewhat humdrum. I get my strings, chat with the checkout clerk, and leave. I may nod a hello at the guitar people on the way, but that is about it. Anyone I have encountered outside of music stores - guitar players or otherwise - who finds out I play thinks the ukulele is cool.

Ana Vidovic played classical guitar at my college in May, which was really a big deal for our little community college - think of Jake coming to a small town. http://www.anavidovic.com/

People have to call in to reserve seat passes. There was a five year old girl who was coming with her parents to the performance meet her idol. Her mother said she had found Ana on her own and listened to all of her YouTube videos. Our series director got a bouquet for her to present to Ana at the end of the concert.

The little girl brought her guitar to show Ana, who is one of the most gracious people on the planet. Her "guitar" was a ukulele.

There was no snobbishness, no denigration - just encouragement to keep playing. That little girl will remember that encounter for the rest of her life.

YogenFruz
06-24-2014, 06:49 AM
There was no snobbishness, no denigration - just encouragement to keep playing. That little girl will remember that encounter for the rest of her life.

I've noticed the same thing with any musician that I've met. IMHO musicians are people who encourage the enjoyment of music, no matter what it is. People who scoff at other people for enjoying [insert instrument here] because their instrument is "better" might be good players, but I wouldn't call them musicians.

therinkydinktink
06-24-2014, 06:50 AM
Some guy was being a huge ass in store and telling me that uke wasn't a real instrument, that I should learn guitar and that uke players weren't real musicians. I think he was trying to impress the lady he was with, and was playing some rendition of PianoMan on the piano. I only started a few months ago and couldn't let him have it on the uke, so I sat down at the piano and played the first 52 bars of Chopin's Winter Wind. link (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBbGVpGNVSA) and told him that anyone can make music, and to stop being a dick. He left in embarrassed haste.

Awesome, love it!:D

CeeJay
06-24-2014, 07:12 AM
I've noticed the same thing with any musician that I've met. IMHO musicians are people who encourage the enjoyment of music, no matter what it is. People who scoff at other people for enjoying [insert instrument here] because their instrument is "better" might be good players, but I wouldn't call them musicians.

I would insert two words before "their" and they would be "they think".....and the rest is spot on.

I wouldn't call them "nice people" either ,never mind not calling them musicians....."mucus membranes" maybe.

gitarzan
06-24-2014, 07:18 AM
I showed up with a soprano Uke at a folk music society get together, and a bunch of guys with Martins said I'd never be heard over them. I indeed, was heard over them, literally, I was playing in a register they weren't in, since they all played cowboy chords (I do too, so...) Anyway, my cousin is a member and she said my uke filled in a pocket above the guitars and sounded great.

stringy
06-24-2014, 08:07 AM
I'm sure I am going to pi$$ off a lot of you so I apologize in advance, BUT..tons of ukuleles that are being played ARE toys. I don't agree that a good player can make any junk uke sound good. I think THEY play fantastic but that uke is still a cheap, plastic sounding toy.

Not a day goes by that I don't say "Why are these toy/souvenir brands even made, why are music stores carrying them? Then I remember they are they constantly recommended here! If we want people to take our instrument seriously, we need to play real musical instruments. You can't make an ukulele for $1, wholesale them for $5, retail them for $80, and then expect them to be taken seriously! Who would think a violin was real in a case like that?

Cheaply made brands are sending the wrong message and I will not support them. I tell people to wait until they can buy a proper instrument to learn on.

I never recommend a toy ukulele to a person who wants to learn how to play. If an uke needs to be set-up in order for them to become playable, that is the first red flag. Yet everyone here encourages getting a cheap-o and having it "fixed". Then the player develops a tin ear and thinks it is a real musical instrument.

That is why most people (not just guitarist) think the uke is just a toy. I agree with them. There are so many great players on this site, I watch your videos in awe all the time thinking....he is so good but the uke sounds like a toy.

For the record I am not talking about imports vs Hawaiian made. I am not talking about high-end expensive vs low priced. I am talking about PROPERLY MADE instruments in solid wood that are not mass-produced and that do not have to be set-up so you can play them in tune up the fretboard!

iamesperambient
06-24-2014, 08:14 AM
I'm sure I am going to pi$$ off a lot of you so I apologize in advance, BUT..tons of ukuleles that are being played ARE toys. I don't agree that a good player can make any junk uke sound good. I think THEY play fantastic but that uke is still a cheap, plastic sounding toy.

Not a day goes by that I don't say "Why are these toy/souvenir brands even made, why are music stores carrying them? Then I remember they are they constantly recommended here! If we want people to take our instrument seriously, we need to play real musical instruments. You can't make an ukulele for $1, wholesale them for $5, retail them for $80, and then expect them to be taken seriously! Who would think a violin was real in a case like that?

Cheaply made brands are sending the wrong message and I will not support them. I tell people to wait until they can buy a proper instrument to learn on.

I never recommend a toy ukulele to a person who wants to learn how to play. If an uke needs to be set-up in order for them to become playable, that is the first red flag. Yet everyone here encourages getting a cheap-o and having it "fixed". Then the player develops a tin ear and thinks it is a real musical instrument.

That is why most people (not just guitarist) think the uke is just a toy. I agree with them. There are so many great players on this site, I watch your videos in awe all the time thinking....he is so good but the uke sounds like a toy.

For the record I am not talking about imports vs Hawaiian made. I am not talking about high-end expensive vs low priced. I am talking about PROPERLY MADE instruments in solid wood that are not mass-produced and that do not have to be set-up so you can play them in tune up the fretboard!

same goes for guitar pretty sure robert johnson
and other old blues guitar pioneers played
cheap low end guitars and who would argue
or slag robert Johnson's guitar if he was stil
alive today ? I still go if you play good
and can't afford something expensive
it's really the player to take serious not the instrument
just my opinion and same goes for uke.

Booli
06-24-2014, 08:42 AM
those kind of comments make me want flip out, but instead i responded snidely (yep its a mini guitar got shrunk in the wash). F-ing a-holes

Seems to me that these kinds of guitar players (or even willfully and maliciously ignorant folks) seem to multiply in number every time some gear maker release a fancy new distortion pedal...like in the Gremlins movie, just KNOWING about the distortion pedal is like feeding them after midnight...

NOT everybody WANTS to be Eddie Van Halen or Steve Vai, some folks prefer more of a Wes Montgomery or John/Bucky Pizarelli style - DUH!

I played guitar for 35 years before coming to the uke, and even then I encountered this hostility if I had my classical nylon in view of someone with a 7 or 8 string Ibanez electric that was a monstrosity painted with fluorescent-green blood-dripping skulls over an orange and purple backdrop . :confused: (my eyes bleed, still cannot UNSEE)

elsewhere on this forum, I saw some advice that I'd like to force these kinds guitar players to heed:

"Just shut up and play!":music::rock:

and I think it will be better for everyone, and the resentful/degrading debates of uke vs. guitar will soon be forgotten...

bu that's just my :2cents:

stevepetergal
06-24-2014, 08:49 AM
This hasn't happened to me. But, the only contact I have with guitarists these days is through ukulele community functions. When I first brought an ukulele to a luthier I think they might have given me a suspicious eye. But, that eye has seen that I consider my ukuleles to be serious musical instruments. I believe they now agree. I think they take me seriously, so they now take my instruments seriously as well.

RichM
06-24-2014, 08:50 AM
I used to have a girlfriend who was always questioning her decisions:

"My friend says my hair color is awful. What should I do?"
"My friend thinks my job doesn't help anybody. What should I do?"
"My friend says my shoes aren't stylish. What should I do?"

My advice?

"Get new friends."

Works here, too.

stringy
06-24-2014, 08:53 AM
same goes for guitar pretty sure robert johnsonand
other old blues guitar pioneers played cheap low end
guitars and who would argue or slag robert Johnson's
guitar if he was stil alive today ? I still go if you play good
and can't afford something expensive
it's really the player to take serious not the instrument
just my opinion and same goes for uke.



....and yet toy ukuleles continue to flood the market. More so than any other stringed instrument. That is why the ukulele is not taken seriously. People play toy ukes more than they play toy guitars, toy violins, toy cellos, etc.

Most people on this site play way better than me. But a lot of them appear to be tone deaf to the sound of their instrument. Like I always said.....we get used to the sound we hear.

Understand I am on the same side as the rest of you. I LOVE the ukulele. It is my instrument of choice, but how do you expect others to take us seriously if we promote souvenirs?

RichM
06-24-2014, 08:56 AM
I'm sure I am going to pi$$ off a lot of you so I apologize in advance, BUT..tons of ukuleles that are being played ARE toys. I don't agree that a good player can make any junk uke sound good. I think THEY play fantastic but that uke is still a cheap, plastic sounding toy.

Not a day goes by that I don't say "Why are these toy/souvenir brands even made, why are music stores carrying them? Then I remember they are they constantly recommended here! If we want people to take our instrument seriously, we need to play real musical instruments. You can't make an ukulele for $1, wholesale them for $5, retail them for $80, and then expect them to be taken seriously! Who would think a violin was real in a case like that?

Cheaply made brands are sending the wrong message and I will not support them. I tell people to wait until they can buy a proper instrument to learn on.

I never recommend a toy ukulele to a person who wants to learn how to play. If an uke needs to be set-up in order for them to become playable, that is the first red flag. Yet everyone here encourages getting a cheap-o and having it "fixed". Then the player develops a tin ear and thinks it is a real musical instrument.

That is why most people (not just guitarist) think the uke is just a toy. I agree with them. There are so many great players on this site, I watch your videos in awe all the time thinking....he is so good but the uke sounds like a toy.

For the record I am not talking about imports vs Hawaiian made. I am not talking about high-end expensive vs low priced. I am talking about PROPERLY MADE instruments in solid wood that are not mass-produced and that do not have to be set-up so you can play them in tune up the fretboard!

See? Musical snobbery is not just the domain of guitar players. Hilarious, ironic post to prove the point. Well done!

iamesperambient
06-24-2014, 08:59 AM
....and yet toy ukuleles continue to flood the market. More so than any other stringed instrument. That is why the ukulele is not taken seriously. People play toy ukes more than they play toy guitars, toy violins, toy cellos, etc.

Most people on this site play way better than me. But a lot of them appear to be tone deaf to the sound of their instrument. Like I always said.....we get used to the sound we hear.

Understand I am on the same side as the rest of you. I LOVE the ukulele. It is my instrument of choice, but how do you expect others to take us seriously if we promote souvenirs?

again not everyone has the funds for high end ukes.
a 150 dollar uke is expensive to me at the moment
but some people can't afford more than a makala
dolphin I don't think that it shouldn't be taken
seriously because they make cheap instruments
eventually a good player will save up and get
something better but the instrument shouldn't
be looked at poorly cos cheap ones exist
I've seen tons of toy piece of crap guitars
and even souvenir guitars no one seems to mind hmmm

The Big Kahuna
06-24-2014, 09:00 AM
I took up the guitar 37 years ago to get laid.

I took up the ukulele 2 years ago because I love the sound and versatility of the instrument...and also because it's a handy thing to have around to practice on while I'm waiting to get laid.

iamesperambient
06-24-2014, 09:03 AM
I took up the guitar 37 years ago to get laid.

I took up the ukulele 2 years ago because I love the sound and versatility of the instrument.


I agree started on guitar thought it was cool
but liked the sound of uke better and
because of that became a better player
on the uke due to my stronger interest
in the instrument over guitar.

I played tons of crappy guitars no one seemed
to mind there. I don't really get this mind set
against affordable or cheap ukes it almost
seems as a status symbol to people
rather than about the music which upsets me.

RichM
06-24-2014, 09:13 AM
I took up the guitar 37 years ago to get laid.

I took up the ukulele 2 years ago because I love the sound and versatility of the instrument...and also because it's a handy thing to have around to practice on while I'm waiting to get laid.

Interesting, I, too, took up the guitar 37 years ago. I did it because I felt like if I didn't play rock music, I was going to explode. Music was all that mattered to me. I idolized Pete Townshend and wanted to play like him (except for the smashing bit).

My first guitar cost $40 and it became a permanent part of me. I never went anywhere without it. Watching tv, doing my homework, out with friends, I always had my guitar. I didn't feel complete without it. I felt that compelled to play music.

I don't think my guitar ever helped me get laid. It's a good thing that wasn't one of my goals. :)

At the age of 50, music has become a lifelong passion. I've added banjo, mandolin, bass, and ukulele to my repertoire. I've played with friends, gigged with bands, joined community jams, attended festivals. Music is one of the best parts of my life. And yes, I've accumulated a nice stable of quality instruments.

But without that $40 guitar, none of this would have happened. It helped drive a lifelong passion.

Good thing there was no internet back then to tell me what a piece of junk it was. I might have never started.

iamesperambient
06-24-2014, 09:15 AM
Interesting, I, too, took up the guitar 37 years ago. I did it because I felt like if I didn't play rock music, I was going to explode. Music was all that mattered to me. I idolized Pete Townshend and wanted to play like him (except for the smashing bit).

My first guitar cost $40 and it became a permanent part of me. I never went anywhere without it. Watching tv, doing my homework, out with friends, I always had my guitar. I didn't feel complete without it. I felt that compelled to play music.

I don't think my guitar ever helped me get laid. It's a good thing that wasn't one of my goals. :)

At the age of 50, music has become a lifelong passion. I've added banjo, mandolin, bass, and ukulele to my repertoire. I've played with friends, gigged with bands, joined community jams, attended festivals. Music is one of the best parts of my life. And yes, I've accumulated a nice stable of quality instruments.

But without that $40 guitar, none of this would have happened. It helped drive a lifelong passion.

Good thing there was no internet back then to tell me what a piece of junk it was. I might have never started.

excellent point !

The Big Kahuna
06-24-2014, 09:24 AM
I agree started on guitar thought it was cool
but liked the sound of uke better and
because of that became a better player
on the uke due to my stronger interest
in the instrument over guitar.

I played tons of crappy guitars no one seemed
to mind there. I don't really get this mind set
against affordable or cheap ukes it almost
seems as a status symbol to people
rather than about the music which upsets me.

Just out of interest, is your screen tall and thin?

iamesperambient
06-24-2014, 09:32 AM
Just out of interest, is your screen tall and thin?

I'm using an ipod so yes actually it is

The Big Kahuna
06-24-2014, 09:35 AM
I'm using an ipod so yes actually it is

You know you don't have to hit CR every time you reach the right hand side of the screen?

Dane
06-24-2014, 09:57 AM
And what do you say to them?

I don't say anything. It's more fun to just smile and laugh about them in my head. It's more enjoyable when they DON'T know how ridiculous they are. Plus you usually can't change those peoples minds, not worth it. Spend your energy on someone else who is likely to actually be interested in the ukulele.

RichM
06-24-2014, 10:14 AM
You know you don't have to hit CR every time you reach the right hand side of the screen?

I kind of like it. It's like free verse.

Rllink
06-24-2014, 10:23 AM
Excellent post, because I'm 64 years old and that is exactly how I feel about my ukulele.

iamesperambient
06-24-2014, 11:04 AM
You know you don't have to hit CR every time you reach the right hand side of the screen?

not sure what that evens didn't think my typing would be such an issue damn son! sorry i will bow to thee typing master!

Wicked
06-24-2014, 11:16 AM
This is Mark Stewart, Paul Simon's guitarist and music director - and an all around nice guy. I will allow him to dispel the "serious musician" myth.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oanp6GnbMD0

stringy
06-24-2014, 11:23 AM
See? Musical snobbery is not just the domain of guitar players. Hilarious, ironic post to prove the point. Well done!

LOL, so now wanting to play/hear a musical instrument vs a souvenir is snobbery :)

The answer why the ukulele is not considered a real instrument is because so many of them aren't. Ironic :)

Wicked
06-24-2014, 11:32 AM
Victor makes some of the same points as Mark in this one.

...and he specifically states that his first instrument was a plastic Mickey Mouse guitar.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zvjW9arAZ0


By the way, I am usually averse to TED talks. These just happen to be what I found on YouTube.

stringy
06-24-2014, 11:45 AM
[QUOTE=iamesperambient;1542752]


again not everyone has the funds for high end ukes.
a 150 dollar uke is expensive to me at the moment.....[quote]


I was very clear that I was not talking about high-end ukuleles. So please don't put words in my mouth...thanks :)

I was also clear that it was not about the talent of the player, and I was also clear I was going to pi$$ everyone off.

The bottom line is there is a very good reason why people think ukuleles are toys!! There are thousands of toy ukes made each month!
As long as there is a demand for them they will continue to make these low-quality novelties.

OldePhart
06-24-2014, 12:04 PM
I took up the guitar 37 years ago to get laid.

I took up the ukulele 2 years ago because I love the sound and versatility of the instrument...and also because it's a handy thing to have around to practice on while I'm waiting to get laid.
37 years...man that's a long wait... LOL

mm stan
06-24-2014, 12:10 PM
I still enjoy my first uke and all my ukes...you know, I used to blame I had a cheap uke when I first started too...that may be right for I did not
know how to tune it properly....but now many years later, I can have fun on any uke....does not matter of it's cost or looks....
now all you that blame the uke for your insufficent ability to play should be ashamed of yourself...if it can be tuned it can be played and enjoyed too..just sayin"
As for the snobs, I say relax and just enjoy the journey whatever instrument it may be....so nice to meet people with the same passions, intrests, as I do.....happy strummings

tbeltrans
06-24-2014, 01:18 PM
As a guitar player myself I know where you're coming from, but I think there really is a mindset that is very common among guitarists that you just don't find with players of most other instruments. I think maybe it's because there are so many juveniles attracted to guitar who think they are hot stuff because they can chunk out some easy power chords. Not saying that's all guitarists, by any means, but you're just far more likely to run into the "unearned prima donna attitude" from guitarists than probably any other group.

John

You and the others expressing this sentiment may well be right. I can only speak from the sample of guitar players that I associate with. The owner of Willie's American Guitars in St. Paul is a very accomplished ukulele player, but then he is not a kid. At least one, if not more of the people who work there play at least a bit of ukulele - and ALL respect it as an instrument. I have run into "prima donna" types of musicians of all instruments, many who will readily express an attitude about other instruments. For many years, the guitar was considered an inferior instrument. It was OK to spend $110k on a violin, but a guitar costing $1000 - somebody has half a brain! It seemed to be a cultural thing.

I don't sing and really wouldn't care to. It just doesn't interest me as something I would want to do. I play fingerstyle guitar, chord melody jazz, and jazz in a group as time permits. I can't count how many times I heard "why don't you sing?" because that was always what seemed to be expected from a guitar player. Only in the last 20 years or so has that seemed to change. I have played guitar professionally as a union (AF of M) sideman in a trio. I did that for two years full time on the road, playing 6 nights a week, a week at each place - Holiday Inns, supper clubs, etc. For a "working stiff" musician, it was a solid, dependable income. In every place we played (all over the US and Canada), I met local people, kind and not ego-driven people, who were excellent musicians, but had absolutely no concern for making a career of it or even playing in public. I learned more about attitude from those people than I did from other musicians. Those were the "normal" people.

At the Unitarian Society, where I play jazz guitar, the sax player turned up his nose with snide remarks when my wife told him that I had just gotten a ukulele - none of the other guitar players had that kind of reaction.

To me, it takes all kinds and any one of us can easily build a case that players of <fill in the instrument here> are aholes and snobs about the ukulele. There are enough of them to go around of all instruments and styles of music. We can choose to either focus on them and feel miserable or focus on the kinder people who want to hear us play and do not look down on the ukulele. If we did that, we would have nothing to complain about and maybe nothing to post about. So, here we go...

Tony

Pundabaya
06-24-2014, 01:23 PM
I took up the guitar 37 years ago to get laid.

I took up the ukulele 2 years ago because I love the sound and versatility of the instrument...and also because it's a handy thing to have around to practice on while I'm waiting to get laid.

I took up the ukulele to get laid... didn't work, but at least I spend my lonely nights twanging on my little instrument now.

CeeJay
06-24-2014, 01:34 PM
I took up the ukulele to get laid... didn't work, but at least I spend my lonely nights twanging on my little instrument now.

F'naar f'naar ........(which is a dirty laugh in typespeak....just so you know)

Nickie
06-24-2014, 02:33 PM
As usual, you guys crack me up! No wonder I waste so much time here...it beats the heck outta FB!
But please, let's not pick on someone
because their I pod can't spread
the sentences out....
or because their font is funny
or because the play a TOY UKULELE!
so what? who cares?
I recently had an interesting thing happen....we are big into the Dances of Universal Peace....Tammy has played guitar for them for over 20 years...we were at one of the dances, and another guitarist, who would never speak to me, or even acknowledge me....well, after I played my little soprano along with them, he came over and started asking questions!
I used to be a music snob....would only listen mostly to Classical or Bluegrass....I understand the need for purism with these musicians...I don't expect them to be mean to me if I play their brands of music, but I don't expect to be invited to join them, either.....if a guitarist, or any other musician for that matter, makes fun of my uke....I pretty much ignore them....I can keep up with most of them I've met, and I can blow some of them into the ditch....I try to keep my ego out of it....I just don't take it personal....I'm a good ambassador for the uke, and arguing with people isn't my way of being that....pissing matches are no fun, and there are no winners....I'd rather jam with them....and if it's a toy, how come so many guitarists play the uke? Even Tommy Emanuel...

tbeltrans
06-24-2014, 02:41 PM
As usual, you guys crack me up! No wonder I waste so much time here...it beats the heck outta FB!
But please, let's not pick on someone
because their I pod can't spread
the sentences out....
or because their font is funny
or because the play a TOY UKULELE!
so what? who cares?
I recently had an interesting thing happen....we are big into the Dances of Universal Peace....Tammy has played guitar for them for over 20 years...we were at one of the dances, and another guitarist, who would never speak to me, or even acknowledge me....well, after I played my little soprano along with them, he came over and started asking questions!
I used to be a music snob....would only listen mostly to Classical or Bluegrass....I understand the need for purism with these musicians...I don't expect them to be mean to me if I play their brands of music, but I don't expect to be invited to join them, either.....if a guitarist, or any other musician for that matter, makes fun of my uke....I pretty much ignore them....I can keep up with most of them I've met, and I can blow some of them into the ditch....I try to keep my ego out of it....I just don't take it personal....I'm a good ambassador for the uke, and arguing with people isn't my way of being that....pissing matches are no fun, and there are no winners....I'd rather jam with them....and if it's a toy, how come so many guitarists play the uke? Even Tommy Emanuel...


This is a point I was trying to make but got disagreement: ....and if it's a toy, how come so many guitarists play the uke? Even Tommy Emanuel...

I am glad I am not the only who recognizes this FACT! I sometimes think people like to divide people (these people play guitar and don't like ukulele players, and these people play ukulele and feel persecuted by guitar players, and ...) rather than finding commonality. Maybe I am fortunate to be around other musicians who are a rather curious lot and will pick up most anything and try making music on it. A lot of the divisiveness seems to happen on the internet, rather than face to face, though obviously people here have cited solid examples of face to face ukulele persecution too (even I did, but it wasn't a guitar player). What a wacky world we live in!

Tony

Andy Chen
06-24-2014, 02:47 PM
I showed up with a soprano Uke at a folk music society get together, and a bunch of guys with Martins said I'd never be heard over them. I indeed, was heard over them, literally, I was playing in a register they weren't in, since they all played cowboy chords (I do too, so...) Anyway, my cousin is a member and she said my uke filled in a pocket above the guitars and sounded great.

I completely agree that the uke definitely has its sonic niche and this may not always be fully appreciated.

KnowsPickin
06-24-2014, 02:54 PM
Victor makes some of the same points as Mark in this one.

...and he specifically states that his first instrument was a plastic Mickey Mouse guitar.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zvjW9arAZ0


By the way, I am usually averse to TED talks. These just happen to be what I found on YouTube.

Thank you SO much for posting this video. Victor Wooten came as close as anyone I've heard in outlining the true meanings of music. When we make music together, we are greater than the sum of the parts. I really enjoyed hearing him talk.

On a related note, in one of his unfinished projects Peter Townsend articulated the idea that if we ever find the meaning of life it will be a musical note. That is a bit oversimplified, but really hits close to the heart of the matter.

RichM
06-24-2014, 03:15 PM
On a related note, in one of his unfinished projects Peter Townshend articulated the idea that if we ever find the meaning of life it will be a musical note.

Pure and easy, playin' so free like a breath rippling by.


http://youtu.be/_MJd482Cldw

bonesigh
06-24-2014, 03:37 PM
LOL, perhaps it's just because you have a little instrument! No, really, please don't take it seriously, it just had to be said! I love what mmstan said about still playing his first uke. Just today I was cleaning up in the basement (we'd had a flood) anyway, I sat down to rest and what was there on the couch, a makala dolphin I've been meaning to fix. It's got a buzz. There was no better instrument to be had at that moment. I played that instrument and buzz be damned! I enjoyed it just as much as any of the many ukes I have. Making music has absorbed my entire being since finding the ukulele. No other instrument has done that for me. Wish I'd had a "toy" when I was growing up!

It was fun reading these posts and watching the "Ted" vids. Reminded me of the time I went to the local band here in Berryville VA. They said they welcomed everyone. This was about 2 years after I started playing uke. I was just about laughed out of the place. It did not feel good and I couldn't understand their animosity. Perhaps some day I will return and insist that they let me play along! LOL, nah, never will.

I teach uke here in our grade school as an after school club. Also got ukulele's into the music program here as because of me the music teacher got a grant for 25 ukes for the school. I was talking to the dad of one of my best students and he said "I'm hoping that my son playing the uke will someday help him graduate to guitar". Sigh............


I took up the ukulele to get laid... didn't work, but at least I spend my lonely nights twanging on my little instrument now.

CeeJay
06-24-2014, 03:42 PM
Never mind bloody guitarists being "snobby" there are Ukulele players who are snobby about other Ukulele players...

tbeltrans
06-24-2014, 03:52 PM
Well, after thinking about it a bit, I think I clear all this discussion up very nicely.

All Ukuleles are toys!
All Guitars are toys!

We PLAY music. Our instruments are our toys. There is really no reason why anybody should get snobbish about any of this when viewed from this perspective.

Tony

CeeJay
06-24-2014, 03:56 PM
Well, after thinking about it a bit, I think I clear all this discussion up very nicely.

All Ukuleles are toys!
All Guitars are toys!

We PLAY music. Our instruments are our toys. There is really no reason why anybody should get snobbish about any of this when viewed from this perspective.

Tony

And yet so many manage it....does not make any sense does it ?

Andy Chen
06-24-2014, 04:21 PM
Well, after thinking about it a bit, I think I clear all this discussion up very nicely.

All Ukuleles are toys!
All Guitars are toys!

We PLAY music. Our instruments are our toys. There is really no reason why anybody should get snobbish about any of this when viewed from this perspective.

Tony

I can't agree more.

ksiegel
06-24-2014, 04:40 PM
I used to play guitar (please note that I never considered myself "a guitarist" or "a musician" - just a guy who played guitar). Due to an arm injury, I can't play more than a few minutes without excruciating pain, so I stopped. (And started getting miserable, which I didn't realize).

Three years ago, around Thanksgiving, my late father-in-law gave me his 1950s Harmony uke. I tuned it up, and within minutes, I was making music - playing without pain.

In December, I discovered UU. In January, a local woman who has become a very close friend to my wife and me told me about the local ukulele club, so I started going. the club does a song circle, so it was soon my turn to lead a song. I closed my eyes, played, and sang. And - to my surprise - I survived.

I went to a Dance festival a couple of years ago, and sat down with a gathering of Old Time players, and pulled out my FireFly. I was playing wtih them for about 30-45 minutes when someone noticed I wasn't paying a banjo. No negative comments.

Last fall, I decided to take the plunge and go to the local Open Mic sponsored by the local Folk Club. I walked in with my ukulele, and several people gave me "The Look".

But I played - and "the look" went away. And was replaced with some open mouth staring.

Now, if I'm not there, they wonder why. I've been complimented on my song choice soften. I can keep up with them, sometimes they can't keep up with me, and changing keys has become easy.

Now, they capo up and down the neck often, and one day I said "What is it with all of you guitar players and your capos? it just isn't Natural!"

I'd just like to point out that many of these musicians have played on the sloop Clearwater, and have weekly paid gigs. Me? I just like to play.

And it works. Haven't had a snide remark for a long time now.

peaceweaver3
06-24-2014, 05:15 PM
I've never encountered a guitarist who was snobby towards the uke, or to me for that matter. :) But that comment about "the little guitar" does bug me, though interestingly, I've never heard it from a guitarist, just in general when I have a figure 8 shaped uke.

However, I knew a guitarist slightly and we played at the same open mic. He was a fellow songwriter, and I liked his music and style, and he was funny. But I was surprised when he asked to borrow my uke for a Hawaiian song. When I picked myself off the floor LOL, I said sure, and he did Let's Talk Dirty in Hawaiian. It was hilarious, not something I would have played, and I swear my uke was never quite the same after that. :D

Another guitarist I know well is a minister. Their music director is a uke player, and they do my songs at services and other gatherings. This guitarist admits they sound best on the uke - I always say, "Well, they were written on one, but you're welcome to re-arrange them." He never does, and their uke player is the main musician. But then, this is a non-traditional "worship" crowd to begin with.

I could stand to meet other musicians like these open-minded, good-hearted folks, guitarists or otherwise!

Fred Ukestone
06-24-2014, 05:42 PM
OldeFart John makes a good point. It's not a good look striking a rock pose when playing a mahalo flying V !!

dusty
06-24-2014, 06:32 PM
Guitar players can be snobby, but any real musician should see the simple beauty (and fun) of a ukulele. The guys you're running into (and I bet most of them are guys) may just be responding to the current "fad" aspect of the uke (just like the teens and '20s of the last century). It might be helpful to remind them that the 6-string guitar has had it's share of "fad" eras, too. You also may want to direct them to that other little stringed instrument, the mandolin. I've known only a few guitar players who can keep up with the average bluegrass mando picker.

The Big Kahuna
06-24-2014, 07:03 PM
37 years...man that's a long wait... LOL

I've been occupying myself with a grip exerciser while I'm waiting.

http://www.thebigkahuna.co.uk/bb2.jpg

drbekken
06-24-2014, 08:03 PM
Snobbery of all kinds must quite simply be ignored. Play whatever instrument you like, and be proud and happy about it. Allow others the same pleasure and privilege. As for 'toy instruments'; they may be a person's initial gateway into a lifetime in music. I cannot remember a time in my life when I did not play music (started VERY young...), and the element of PLAY was crucial. Toy instruments are excellent for such purposes, then you move on. The ukulele comes in many guises; one of which may be as a 'toy'. As such, it demystifies the act of playing music, which in my opinion is a good thing. Never mind musical and cultural snobbery.

Andy Chen
06-24-2014, 08:10 PM
The ukulele... demystifies the act of playing music, which in my opinion is a good thing. Never mind musical and cultural snobbery.

Amen to that!

Luke El U
06-24-2014, 09:22 PM
Ask the guitarists if they can play a Baroque lute. If anyone says yes, have them play Bach or Weiss. If they can play it well, congratulate them and go home and play your uke with joy!

buddhuu
06-24-2014, 09:31 PM
The snobbery is understandable in people who have that tendency front and centre. If it doesn't manifest itself in hostility to 'ukuleles then it will probably emerge somewhere else. Some people just like to do the superiority thing.

Ukes are small; they sometimes come in funny colours and with pictures on; you can buy 'ukuleles in some toy shops; 'ukulele is relatively easy to learn to a basic competence that will allow accompaniment to songs. They're an easy target for uninformed shredders.

'Ukulele is my third instrument these days. I play guitar at a twice weekly pub session where I sing, and I'm lead guitarist in a soul/blues band - but I love 'ukulele as much now as I did when I first discovered it but it just doesn't fit my current schedule as well as guitar and mandolin so I don't play it quite as often now But I would never be without one.

The snobbery thing is particularly common amongst guitarists. As others have mentioned, the brand snobbery thing is awful. It's much worse amongst axe maniacs than it is amongst uke players. My two main guitars are both Squier Classic Vibes - one Strat and one Tele. They are amongst the best guitars I've owned in 40 years of playing, and I've had dozens of great axes, but people still snort and go "Squier?!" until they try them.

It means nothing. It's just a display of ignorance and nothing to worry about. I don't bother trying to defend my instruments - especially against anyone who can't perform without hiding behind distortion.

What's the difference between God and a lead guitarist? God doesn't think he's a lead guitarist.

Pundabaya
06-24-2014, 10:43 PM
I think that the qualities that make the ukulele the butt of jokes from certain musicians, are the qualities that make the instrument attractive to a significant subset of use players... those of us who thought 'music is for other people'.

It's small, so you are not having to wrestle the instrument while playing, it doesn't tear your fingers up like steel stringed instruments do, and it's not the loudest, so fewer people hear you when you suck. You don't have to worry about picks, or bows, or sticks, or transport. It's not threatening, so it invites play. Even for those who've never played anything before.

Roselynne
06-24-2014, 11:13 PM
I guess it boils down to where we are, and maybe on who we find to hang out with while we're there.

I can't say I've ever run into an anti-ukulele guitar-snob in real life. The few I see online tend to get "outvoted" by folks who play both. Just about every guitar jam group I've been in has had ukuleles, mandolins and/or basses join in -- when they can't make it, we miss 'em! (My regular ukulele group is a combination class/jam deal, so it's ukulele only. So far.)

Guitar is my first instrument; I added ukulele to make it a mix. To me, they're two different and equally serious instruments. I'm the one who needs to get more serious about improvement!

mm stan
06-25-2014, 12:05 AM
The Snobbery thing is just arrogance and condesending, and a form of disrespect.....I choose to stay away from those who have this type of outlook...Golden Rule- if they are your friends,
this should not happen...if it does, they are NOT your friends... You know what to do....

tbeltrans
06-25-2014, 12:55 AM
I guess it boils down to where we are, and maybe on who we find to hang out with while we're there.

I can't say I've ever run into an anti-ukulele guitar-snob in real life. The few I see online tend to get "outvoted" by folks who play both. Just about every guitar jam group I've been in has had ukuleles, mandolins and/or basses join in -- when they can't make it, we miss 'em! (My regular ukulele group is a combination class/jam deal, so it's ukulele only. So far.)

Guitar is my first instrument; I added ukulele to make it a mix. To me, they're two different and equally serious instruments. I'm the one who needs to get more serious about improvement!

Be careful here about the "serious" aspect of it. In one of my first posts, I mentioned that I wanted to take the ukulele seriously (i.e. as a guitar player who takes music seriously enough to actually learn what I am doing, I also accord the ukulele the same respect), I was taken to task about it. It has always seemed normal to me that when I get involved in something, I want to learn about it and do well with it - not as some sort of contest since I really am not the competitive type, but because I enjoy the journey.

It is surprising what people will take exception to, and there does not seem to be forewarning. I don't know how it is in other countries these days since I have not traveled in several years, but in the US, there seems to be a very odd tendency with "political correctness" in which people are offended by darn near anything another person says or does regardless of intention. This has really been gaining steam over the last few years. I was dismayed to see some of it in these forums after only being her a short while. I hope that was an anomaly, since most of what I read here seems quite friendly.

Tony

Wicked
06-25-2014, 01:16 AM
It is surprising what people will take exception to, and there does not seem to be forewarning.

Tony

I take offense that you desire forewarning! Everyone with half a brain knows that hindsight is far superior. Don't you know that it's 20/20?

Really... Some people...

Rllink
06-25-2014, 03:57 AM
From what I've been reading here, I lucked out when I bought one of those cheap Makala ukes. I don't want anyone to take me too seriously or think that I'm some sort of musician. If that happened, they might expect me to dazzle them with my talent, which I would most certainly be unable to do. As it is, all anyone has to do is take one look at me and my uke, and their expectations are so low that anything I do is impressive.

maclay
06-25-2014, 03:57 AM
Most of the time snobbery or disrespect just comes from ignorance.....they simply don't know how beautiful ukulele music can be.

As a luthier, I encounter this too. I tell people that I build ukuleles for a living, and they immediately think I build little toys or trinket that you would purchase in some tourist trap. I tell them "no, I build real instruments for real musicians" and they say "cool", but they still have no idea lol.

I don't let it bother me. To quote The Dude - "I cant be worried about that sh$t. Life goes on, man."

Steedy
06-25-2014, 05:12 AM
The Dude abides.

ksiegel
06-25-2014, 05:23 AM
The snobbery thing is particularly common amongst guitarists. As others have mentioned, the brand snobbery thing is awful. It's much worse amongst axe maniacs than it is amongst uke players. My two main guitars are both Squier Classic Vibes - one Strat and one Tele. They are amongst the best guitars I've owned in 40 years of playing, and I've had dozens of great axes, but people still snort and go "Squier?!" until they try them.

Isn't Bruce Springsteen's telecaster a Squire?

haertig
06-25-2014, 05:25 AM
Funny, I've seen this same "snobbery" discussion in forums for every other hobby I have. I've got to deal with my fly fishing gear snobs, my target rifle snobs, my telescope snobs, my slingshot snobs, my computer OS snobs... And now I'm going to have to deal with "guitar snobs"? Sheesh! What for me to do, what to do...

CeeJay
06-25-2014, 05:29 AM
Funny, I've seen this same "snobbery" discussion in forums for every other hobby I have. I've got to deal with my fly fishing gear snobs, my target rifle snobs, my telescope snobs, my slingshot snobs, my computer OS snobs... And now I'm going to have to deal with "guitar snobs"? Sheesh! What for me to do, what to do...

hah ..to go on ...Banjo snobs , snobs ...just snobs ...and Ackordeen snobs ....(They hate it when I write ackordeen.....) if it aint Italian it aint an accordion and they slag Chinese stuff rotten .....(to be fair some Chinese Accordions are rotten ...but they'll improve, Black Diamond and Steve Clinkscale variety are a delightful exception ).....so just smile sweetly and get over it .

cb56
06-25-2014, 06:07 AM
........and we should care about what guitard players think? Why????

Wicked
06-25-2014, 06:25 AM
slingshot snobs

Tha, right there, is a killer band name, my friend.

TG&Y
06-25-2014, 06:30 AM
....heh....


Nothing, I don't talk to guitarists.




;)

haertig
06-25-2014, 06:46 AM
slingshot snobsTha, right there, is a killer band name, my friend.
Who would have thought there could be snobbery regarding what type of rubber/latex you use in your slingshot bands, or whether you use tubular or flat bandsets, but alas...

iamesperambient
06-25-2014, 07:12 AM
Funny, I've seen this same "snobbery" discussion in forums for every other hobby I have. I've got to deal with my fly fishing gear snobs, my target rifle snobs, my telescope snobs, my slingshot snobs, my computer OS snobs... And now I'm going to have to deal with "guitar snobs"? Sheesh! What for me to do, what to do...

if you like watches go on watchuseek forums damn talk about snobs watch snobs are the worst!

ricdoug
06-25-2014, 08:42 AM
If one needs an expensive 'ukulele to satisfy their needs for resonance and intonation all the way up the fret board, so be it. That keeps the luthiers gainfully employed.

If one is happy playing open chords at the bottom of the neck and/or singing along, so be it. It makes them happy.

I lead a kanikapila in South Orange County where I purposely use a songbook with simple arrangements. This allows all skill levels and instruments to be included. There some that play all around and in between those chords and all over the fretboards, which adds to the collective sound. That makes them happy.

When someone hands me their Makala Dolphin/Shark or Eddy Finn Minnow and asks me if it's a good 'ukulele, I play something fancy and compliment them on their instrument. This makes them happy.

It's fun bring groups of 'ukulele players to assisted living homes and public events/charities that play their chords at the bottom of the neck. Most do not have working knowledge of music theory or even know what a I IV V progression is, BUT they play and sing music that makes lot's of people happy.

The 'ukulele is very popular in Southern California. If you don't play an 'ukulele here, you are uncool :-) Ric

greyghost
06-25-2014, 09:33 AM
I tell them they're like the guys who drive Ferraris and Lamborghinis, they're over compensating for something ;)

I actually find it very effective to point out the very small size of my soprano and then say that maybe I'm compensating for something....

haertig
06-25-2014, 09:49 AM
A good response to a snobby comment might be, "I never believed a high end instrument could make a marginal musician sound better. But I'm willing to listen and let you prove me wrong."

Subtle, but effective.

RichM
06-25-2014, 09:53 AM
A good response to a snobby comment might be, "I never believed a high end instrument could make a marginal musician sound better. But I'm willing to listen and let you prove me wrong."

Subtle, but effective.

As much fun as it is to believe that snobs are mediocre musicians with too much money, they are often quite accomplished players. The reality is that people who would put down another player's choice of instrument are just jerks, plain and simple. I doubt even the most cutting remark is going to "put them in their place." I'll spend my time with people who enjoy the process of making music, not those who put down others for not subscribing to their dogma. And that's pretty universally true.

OldePhart
06-25-2014, 09:54 AM
A good response to a snobby comment might be, "I never believed a high end instrument could make a marginal musician sound better. But I'm willing to listen and let you prove me wrong."

Subtle, but effective.

Heh, heh, would zing right over the heads of most of the snobs I've encountered. They'd walk away thinking you'd just complimented them...

John

tbeltrans
06-25-2014, 02:00 PM
A simple approach to snobbery might be "Don't laugh - it's paid for". From what I understand, too many people borrow money to buy nice guitars.

Tony

stevepetergal
06-25-2014, 02:53 PM
I have to admit, I consider ukuleles part guitar and part toy.
But this doesn't mean I think they're not real musical instruments or that those of us who play them aren't musicians. It's the guitarists I think are suspect.

tbeltrans
06-25-2014, 02:57 PM
Just remember that ukuleles are "real" and it is us who aren't. :)

Tony

Andy Chen
06-25-2014, 03:26 PM
Just remember that ukuleles are "real" and it is us who aren't. :)

Tony

Absolutely! Great reminder for us to keep it real.

Sven-Uke
06-26-2014, 10:36 AM
I actually don't give a sh#t about what negative feelings people might have about ukuleles.

Roselynne
06-26-2014, 11:50 AM
I guess it boils down to where we are, and maybe on who we find to hang out with while we're there.

I can't say I've ever run into an anti-ukulele guitar-snob in real life. The few I see online tend to get "outvoted" by folks who play both. Just about every guitar jam group I've been in has had ukuleles, mandolins and/or basses join in -- when they can't make it, we miss 'em! (My regular ukulele group is a combination class/jam deal, so it's ukulele only. So far.)

Guitar is my first instrument; I added ukulele to make it a mix. To me, they're two different and equally serious instruments. I'm the one who needs to get more serious about improvement!


Be careful here about the "serious" aspect of it. In one of my first posts, I mentioned that I wanted to take the ukulele seriously (i.e. as a guitar player who takes music seriously enough to actually learn what I am doing, I also accord the ukulele the same respect), I was taken to task about it. It has always seemed normal to me that when I get involved in something, I want to learn about it and do well with it - not as some sort of contest since I really am not the competitive type, but because I enjoy the journey.

It is surprising what people will take exception to, and there does not seem to be forewarning. I don't know how it is in other countries these days since I have not traveled in several years, but in the US, there seems to be a very odd tendency with "political correctness" in which people are offended by darn near anything another person says or does regardless of intention. This has really been gaining steam over the last few years. I was dismayed to see some of it in these forums after only being her a short while. I hope that was an anomaly, since most of what I read here seems quite friendly.

Tony

I guess maybe I've been spoiled, a bit. I grew up in Hawai'i, where music is natural, fun, and serious, whether one plays an instrument or not. My current little corner of the Bay Area is not quite so musical, but the attitude is pretty much the same whenever I go to a place where music is played.

For me, improvement comes only with (...ahem...) serious effort ... but the effort itself is a lot of fun! However, I do know that for others, a more laid-back approach is most effective. Different paths. It's all good.

tbeltrans
06-26-2014, 12:33 PM
I guess maybe I've been spoiled, a bit. I grew up in Hawai'i, where music is natural, fun, and serious, whether one plays an instrument or not. My current little corner of the Bay Area is not quite so musical, but the attitude is pretty much the same whenever I go to a place where music is played.

For me, improvement comes only with (...ahem...) serious effort ... but the effort itself is a lot of fun! However, I do know that for others, a more laid-back approach is most effective. Different paths. It's all good.

Yes, I fully agree - however a person wants to approach music is really up to that person.

Tony

JoeJazz2000
11-01-2014, 02:15 PM
Great thread; reminds me a bit of a thread over at the Slide Meister forum on the perception that the chromatic harmonica was a toy. The discussion went on for page after page. I can tell you, as a jazz guitarist with 45+ years of playing and study, taking up the uke has really broadened my playing of stringed instrument playing. I see chords on the uke that never used on the guitar, even when focusing on comping on the high strings. In jazz you strive to improvise, including rhythm. Well, I've picked up more rhythmic ideas in two years on the uke than from a shelf full of swing and bebop comping books. I've worked out wonderful, swinging arrangements of tunes on the uke using strum patterns I don't use or even try on guitar. Being an experienced guitarist gave me a jumpstart on the uke, but playing the uke as its own distinct instrument has made me a better musician. Guitarists who are snobby about the uke are 1. missing out on a wonderful musical experience that is SO accessible to them, and 2. idiots.

Freeda
11-01-2014, 02:32 PM
And what do you say to them?

I am more likely to meet guitarists who are patronizing towards "the little lady with the baby guitar". They are full of advice and I am to bask in their knowledge.

But whatever. No different than going to the hardware store or getting my oil changed.

CeeJay
11-01-2014, 02:56 PM
I am more likely to meet guitarists who are patronizing towards "the little lady with the baby guitar". They are full of advice and I am to bask in their knowledge.

But whatever. No different than going to the hardware store or getting my oil changed.

You need an oil change ??:p

IamNoMan
11-01-2014, 03:23 PM
Being so new to the uke I have yet to encounter any ignorant remarks. Doubtless they will come in time but I have a bag full of snappy/snappish replies ready. I see no reason to allow others folks to try to belittle me for any reason. I frequently take the initiative and belittle myself first!

My stock Ukulele gambit: "I finally got a Martin Guitar".. I hold up my IZ...I hang my head; "I didn't know you weren't supposed to wash them in hot Water"!

VegasGeorge
11-01-2014, 03:47 PM
No, but I've met quite a few Violinists who are snobby toward the Guitar.

CeeJay
11-01-2014, 04:22 PM
No, but I've met quite a few Violinists who are snobby toward the Guitar.

Yeah...but that's only because they cannot get one under their chin and with such a skewed view of life they can only play sideways.......

wayfarer75
11-01-2014, 04:24 PM
I am more likely to meet guitarists who are patronizing towards "the little lady with the baby guitar". They are full of advice and I am to bask in their knowledge.

But whatever. No different than going to the hardware store or getting my oil changed.

I hear that.

Debby
11-01-2014, 04:26 PM
How many guitarists does it take to change a light bulb? Only one. He holds on to it and the world revolves around him. :-)

Three. One to change the bulb, while two stand there and discuss how they would do it better.

Debby
11-01-2014, 05:02 PM
Being so new to the uke I have yet to encounter any ignorant remarks. Doubtless they will come in time but I have a bag full of snappy/snappish replies ready. I see no reason to allow others folks to try to belittle me for any reason. I frequently take the initiative and belittle myself first!

My stock Ukulele gambit: "I finally got a Martin Guitar".. I hold up my IZ...I hang my head; "I didn't know you weren't supposed to wash them in hot Water"!

Lol@ washing them in hot water! I'm going to have to remember that one.

ohmless
11-01-2014, 05:30 PM
I tell them the ukulele chose me. Its sounds just sound happier to me than a guitar.

Yukon Cornelius
11-01-2014, 05:58 PM
And what do you say to them?

Does a bear poop in the woods?



I say nothing to them. Not worth it.

CeeJay
11-02-2014, 01:46 AM
The answer is relatively simple. Most guitarists can easily hear how bad your toy grade uke is and recognise the fact that you have been too lazy to learn much about music.
They enjoy coming along to ukulele group because it is totally recreational and not serious, when they want serious they go to a group that has a background knowledge of music and use instruments that are well beyond toy grade.
If you want to be taken seriously, get a serious instrument and put in some work learning about music and how to play seriously. It is no use dreaming that you can answer the guitarist with a jake like tune, you actually need to do the work to learn how to play it. Then you will probably be invited to join several bands or groups and they wont care what instrument you play.

Sage and wise words indeed .......

Rllink
11-02-2014, 04:06 AM
It has been quite a few months since I last posted on this thread, and I have yet to run into a guitar snob who puts down ukes, but I've sure run into plenty of ukulele snobs who like to put down other ukulele players.

CeeJay
11-02-2014, 04:11 AM
It has been quite a few months since I last posted on this thread, and I have yet to run into a guitar snob who puts down ukes, but I've sure run into plenty of ukulele snobs who like to put down other ukulele players.

...Even sager and wiser ones ..two thumbs up there..

IamNoMan
11-02-2014, 04:41 AM
I have been involved in making music most of my life. People including musicians, and tone deaf or rhythmically dysfunctional musicians have put down my efforts all to often. (This goes beyond the music world as well). For many years I took this critical crap to heart. Listen to what these idiots say, there may be some valid criticism, but most of it is simple ignorance. After they have had their say ignore them. "Illegitimi non carborundum". The girls here understand. "Live with it". It doesn't change the fact that you are you, and as such a valid human being.

Bill1 has some solid advice: http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?p=1598768#post1598768 , but it isn't necessary to "be taken seriously". I am an entertainer, not being taken seriously is frequently advantageous. I don't want to play like Jake either. I want to play like me.

When I am confronted with gratuitous put-down artists and I've reached the limits of tolerance I say: "Other people have opinions. I have values. I play the Ukulele".

HBolte
11-02-2014, 05:09 AM
http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-basic/popcorn.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)

csereduke
11-02-2014, 05:26 AM
An otherwise nice guy told me once he doesn't think singers who accompany themselves on the uke are musicians. Such a line of thinking completely baffles me.

I only would get annoyed if it was a comment coming from a person I respect. The world is full of people who know nothing but get off showing others how stupid they are.
Think for yourself.
Remember, don't drink the kool-aid even if they tell you it tastes good and sometimes the "emperor does not have clothes no matter how many people tell you he does."

sonomajazz
11-02-2014, 06:11 AM
Don't know any guitarists...including myself...

ohmless
11-02-2014, 06:29 AM
your talent level won't impress them. Think Tiny Tim. Got ridiculed for being "funny" or "odd" but is much more talented than I am or even might ever become. An anti bias is just ignorance and it won't be budged. Don't matter if they are guitarists, ukers or what not.

calling them toys is crazy to me. I come from flint michigan and there are hard times. people do their best with what they got. I think the talking down is not only snobbish but a bit elitist/gauche. Definitely not aloha spirited.

Music is music. Don't matter the price of the instrument or even if you own one. Some fine drumming can be done on a 5 gallon bucket for instance or a 2 dollar kazoo.

willisoften
11-02-2014, 09:23 AM
My goodness you are a tolerant bunch.

What about =u[< o 4R$$401E

CeeJay
11-02-2014, 12:18 PM
In addition to my recent post.
Personally, i do not play the ukulele to be taken seriously. I play it for recreation and to please myself, i really don't care what so called "guitar players" think. Obviously some of them are actually good musicians and i would not bother getting my ukulele out of its case if i have the chance to sit and listen and enjoy their playing. Most ukulele players don't really want to learn much about music either because they are very busy with life or they really don't have a need to learn much about music. Recreational music is not necessarily about playing well or musical knowledge, although it can be for some, it is about recreating, socialising, enjoying life doing something you may be really bad at, but you love doing it and so on.
But i posted my comment for those who are stupid or brave enough to try and compete with them. Unless you do some hard work like they have done, you are never going to be able to compete with them and a good thing to do is recognize your own limits and know when to sit down and be quiet so you might learn something.


...So you are dissing the ukelele then ??.:rolleyes:.

I actually do take it bloody seriously ..(I don't expect or want ME to be taken seriously ...F*** That)

I may play the uke like someone killing snakes with a rock ..but I do that to all my instruments..and I may be as daft as a brush with no bristles, but I always try and work hard to produce the goods as well as I am able and get right peed off if I cannot..........

People need to just get used to the fact that not all musicians are necessarily nice people..there will always be good natured rivalry and piss taking ..and then there will be the genuinely snide and there will inevitably be the lofty intellectuals who will look down on others who play less "sophisticated " music...(actually the usual answer to them is nick their scores ..they are then generally buggered ):rolleyes::biglaugh: They also stride these cyber corridors..and they are "fellow" ukers..
So ...basically .....be yourselves ...play what you play,play how you play, live and let live and remember ...some people are Dicks and not because their name is Richard....sorry girls and ladies but I cannot think of a name that works in quite the same way for your lovelinesses.....

Bill1..nice one..I get what you are saying ...some may disagree...but I get it.

Wicked
11-02-2014, 01:01 PM
Hey, this thread has come to life again...

The one thing that nobody has touched upon is that the VAST MAJORITY of “guitar players” kind of suck as musicians. They are no better or worse (on average) than players of any instrument, so the old 80/20 rule pretty much applies. The one glaring difference, however, is that guitar players are more likely to have had lessons, at some point. This is mostly due to the fact that String Monkeys are so common in the wild that finding a teacher is pretty easy. Unfortunately, those handful of lessons (again, a good 80% of guitar players don’t stick to the lessons very long) seem to imbue mediocre guitarists with a sense of superiority.

The other dirty little secret is that large numbers of guitarists see playing the instrument as some type of competition. The culture of “Guitar Gods get the chicks” is ludicrous, but considerably warps wannabe musician’s minds. It is this group that is most likely to make snide remarks about your ukulele. Not because they are super great guitarists, but because they are insecure and need to put others down.

The truth is, the truly good guitar players are musicians first and foremost. They do not care if you play a diddley bow or a harp guitar. They just want you to make some music.

As for Bill1’s comment regarding the social aspects of ukulele - I completely agree. A fellow member of our local ukulele group asked me recently why I was part of the group, since my skill set was way beyond that of most of the other members. “What do you get out of it,” she asked. The answer was simple... I go to the meets to have fun making music and socializing with people from a variety of backgrounds. That is enough for me. (If I wanted to show off my chops, I would just sit in with the Berklee kids at Wally’s Jazz Club... but where is the fun in that?)

On conclusion... everybody just do you. It is your birthright as a human to make music Do it any GD way you want.

CeeJay
11-02-2014, 01:19 PM
Psssst Wicked ...what am the 80/20 rule :anyone:? and shhhhh don't let on that I don't know...







They're behind me aren't they ?:uhoh:

KaraUkey
11-02-2014, 01:52 PM
Great thread; reminds me a bit of a thread over at the Slide Meister forum on the perception that the chromatic harmonica was a toy. The discussion went on for page after page. I can tell you, as a jazz guitarist with 45+ years of playing and study, taking up the uke has really broadened my playing of stringed instrument playing. I see chords on the uke that never used on the guitar, even when focusing on comping on the high strings. In jazz you strive to improvise, including rhythm. Well, I've picked up more rhythmic ideas in two years on the uke than from a shelf full of swing and bebop comping books. I've worked out wonderful, swinging arrangements of tunes on the uke using strum patterns I don't use or even try on guitar. Being an experienced guitarist gave me a jumpstart on the uke, but playing the uke as its own distinct instrument has made me a better musician. Guitarists who are snobby about the uke are 1. missing out on a wonderful musical experience that is SO accessible to them, and 2. idiots.
Over the course of some 40 years of being a singer/guitarist mostly solo and sometimes in small bands, I'd actually never come across a Ukulele. The first time I did I loved the look of it. Given that in GCEA it represents strings 1 to 4 on a guitar from the fifth fret down, my first "uke" was one of my guitars with a capo on the fifth fret. A couple of days later I had my first Uke. Like JoeJazz2000 here, I discovered so many more innovative ways of strumming the Uke than I ever did with a guitar, mainly because I can ditch the plectrum. For me it has always been about entertaining and I've had way more fun with that since I started playing the Uke. Mainly because I have a whole group of people playing with me, including guitarists. As JoeJazz points out the world of the Uke was so accessible to me I am very pleased to have found it, and absolutely love using it to share music with lots of people, many of them completely new to playing music.

SteveZ
11-02-2014, 02:05 PM
Interesting thread. As someone who considers himself a guitarist (not a good one), mandolinist (worse than guitar), banjo player (the neighbors are petitioning against my play) and ukulele player (not bad, but nowhere near traditional), i've learned there are good folk, okay folk and a few downright waste-of-oxygen types.

The good folk are at all skill levels on all instruments, and are the most tolerant and gracious. The okay folk just stay out of everyone's way. The W-O-O types are logo-conscious, snobbish and will go out of their way to be obnoxious - and no amount of "training" will ever change them

Bottom line: half the people you meet are below average (by whatever criteria you have) and a quarter of them may not be worth feeding, let alone paying any attention to their self-righteous dribble. If those slugs happen to play guitar as well, it just shows that anything can happen.

Time to get out the banjo....

Wicked
11-02-2014, 02:21 PM
Psssst Wicked ...what am the 80/20 rule :anyone:? and shhhhh don't let on that I don't know...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareto_principle

Don't worry, it will be our little secret...

In this case, I'm estimating 20% of the guitarists play well, 80% do not.

VegasGeorge
11-02-2014, 02:22 PM
One thing you could tell snobby guitarists that's absolutely true, is that it take a much finer ear to tune the shorter strings of the Ukulele properly, particularly with peg tuners.

CeeJay
11-02-2014, 02:54 PM
Do you mean those bloody awful wooden things that you have to ease out of their holes and hold firmly whilst you put them back before you take them out to retune before you put them back before you take them out to retune them to put them back before you take them out again ...then p**s off and play the piano.....those pegs ??

:old:

IamNoMan
11-02-2014, 03:02 PM
Interesting thread. As someone who considers himself a guitarist (not a good one), mandolinist (worse than guitar), banjo player (the neighbors are petitioning against my play) and ukulele player (not bad, but nowhere near traditional), i've learned there are good folk, okay folk and a few downright waste-of-oxygen types.

The good folk are at all skill levels on all instruments, and are the most tolerant and gracious. The okay folk just stay out of everyone's way. The W-O-O types are logo-conscious, snobbish and will go out of their way to be obnoxious - and no amount of "training" will ever change them

Bottom line: half the people you meet are below average (by whatever criteria you have) and a quarter of them may not be worth feeding, let alone paying any attention to their self-righteous dribble. If those slugs happen to play guitar as well, it just shows that anything can happen.

Time to get out the banjo....I've always considered myself a mediocre musician.It's a long step up from not being a musician. Not knocking anyone here you understand but "In the land of the blind.... The lame lead the blind". Hey Steve my UAS just spread. I just ordered an Eastman Whyte Laydie. Made per 1904 specs except for modern tuners. Always wanted one. and I'd burst if I didn't let it out.

tangimango
11-02-2014, 10:11 PM
ive actually met more guitar players transition to playing only the ukulele more then there guitar. but not the opposite. :)

Phuufme
11-03-2014, 01:25 AM
And I am a 40 year guitar player who never considered the uke until ... we were asked to play at a wedding and the bride asked for "Somewhere Over the Rainbow". I told her, at first, I did not play the uke. Then I went to my favorite guitar shop for something, can't remember, and I saw some ukes there. I talked with the owner, a guitar, uke and mandolin player, who told me the "uke chords are similar to guitar chords with a capo on the 5th fret" story. After that I thought, why not give it a try. So, we did play the song at that wedding, and now I have two ukes.

This was in Feb 2014, so I am a new uke player. At gigs, when I put down the guitar and pick up the uke, we can just feel the audience smiling. After all, who can't smile when a ukulele is being played.

For me its all about making music, as best as I can. As a singer who plays guitar, and now uke, the instruments support the vocals and NOT vice versa. So, for now, I re-learn strumming patterns, learning how to fingerpick 4 strings vs 6 strings, etc. while we sing and strum a bunch of new songs.

SteveZ
11-03-2014, 02:01 AM
I've always considered myself a mediocre musician.It's a long step up from not being a musician. Not knocking anyone here you understand but "In the land of the blind.... The lame lead the blind". Hey Steve my UAS just spread. I just ordered an Eastman Whyte Laydie. Made per 1904 specsexcept for modern tuners. Always wanted one. and I'd burst if I didn't let it out.

Enjoy! Have gone from 5-string to 4 with a tenor banjo and keep everything (including the ukes) except the mandos at CGDA for ease. Hope to see you at the Banjo Hangout.

See...We banjo players (or folk who strive to be) are very cordial and not snobby at all (except with mandolinists (lol)).

Debby
11-03-2014, 02:06 AM
I have never encountered this issue, yet, since I'm such a newbie. I have played guitar most of my life. I don't consider myself an amazing player or even a "guitarist" but I can play well enough to enjoy it and not be embarrassed around accomplished players. I have never heard anyone put down the uke. I use to go watch a local band in Indianapolis, and the singer played a uke in one song and people loved it.

I have encountered egos amongst guitar players and I find it borderline comical. It just shows one's own insecurities, and I just dismiss it and move on. What I found disturbing is how I have witnessed and even experienced how some guitarists get jealous of someone else's instrument that they make suggestions that would sabotage the instrument.

Jealousy, insecurity and ignorance is what guides people to behave this way. It's easier to deal with when the real issue is realized,

SteveZ
11-03-2014, 02:34 AM
I have never encountered this issue, yet, since I'm such a newbie. I have played guitar most of my life. I don't consider myself an amazing player or even a "guitarist" but I can play well enough to enjoy it and not be embarrassed around accomplished players. I have never heard anyone put down the uke. I use to go watch a local band in Indianapolis, and the singer played a uke in one song and people loved it.

I have encountered egos amongst guitar players and I find it borderline comical. It just shows one's own insecurities, and I just dismiss it and move on. What I found disturbing is how I have witnessed and even experienced how some guitarists get jealous of someone else's instrument that they make suggestions that would sabotage the instrument.

Jealousy, insecurity and ignorance is what guides people to behave this way. It's easier to deal with when the real issue is realized,

Call it "string envy"....

Sabantien
11-03-2014, 09:33 PM
I don't really know many musicians.

One plays a uke as well as a few other things, so she's very encouraging.

I work with a guitarist (he's released an album, plays gigs, but our day job keeps him in a house, etc), who thought the uke was a toy and was a bit snobbish I suppose, but more importantly, he encouraged me to play it if I enjoy it. Doesn't matter what you make music with, just make music.

He recently played a quality uke and was rather shocked at how good it was.

The music store I go to, well, the girl who usually helps me out owns 8 ukes, and while the owner is a guitarist, he's never been snobbish about ukes with me.

As for a lot of them being toys... sure. They are. I went into a local music store to check out guitars (I have an acoustic, was thinking of getting electric) and walked out with a cheap, toy uke. That $40 impulse buy is what got me to eventually buy something costing a few hundred. That was an impulse buy too, but I would never have made it if I didn't already have that cheap toy.

Jezbo
11-03-2014, 11:03 PM
Oh, they are just folk that haven't yet played a uke. Be nice to them; what else do they know . . .
Jezbo

IamNoMan
11-04-2014, 04:22 AM
Do you think when Sir Jimmie Galway is busking on his tin whistle, Some guitarist says "why don't you get a real flute instead of that toy"?

actadh
11-04-2014, 07:16 AM
As for a lot of them being toys... sure. They are. I went into a local music store to check out guitars (I have an acoustic, was thinking of getting electric) and walked out with a cheap, toy uke. That $40 impulse buy is what got me to eventually buy something costing a few hundred. That was an impulse buy too, but I would never have made it if I didn't already have that cheap toy.

A cheap toy ukulele got me hooked as well. It still has a fond place in my heart.

A local music store near my work sells entry level quality ukuleles and does not seem to take the product or ukulele players very seriously. I went in for strings and was told all ukulele strings are the same, just re-packaged. I had them order in a set of Aquila Reds for me just to broaden their horizons.

Catulele
11-04-2014, 07:34 AM
I've played with a lot of very good musicians including quite a few gutarists many of them were in very successful regional bands and a few who have recorded with some Big Name groups and I have never experienced this attitude.

I do however know what I'd do if someone said I wasn't a musician because I played Uke. I'd hand it to them an say, Let's hear what you got!
I've had many gutar players ask to try May Uke and despite the similarity in cord shapes(esp as mine it tune dgbe) very few can just pick it up a play it. Only one person has ever been able to do that and he would never think it wasn't a real instrument. For him anything tha makes a sound can be a musical instrument and in his hands usually was.

Ukejenny
11-04-2014, 10:56 AM
It's not the size of the axe, but the way you swing it.

Most real musicians don't jump on the "pooh-pooh" bandwagon. That has been my personal experience. They might be surprised when I tell them I play, because they are used to me being in the clarinet world, but most intelligent musicians have been exposed to many different instruments. Around here, folk instruments are very popular and that helps.

Now, I've had a couple of people kind of sneer about it and on one of those occasions, I was able to hand the "guitar player" my ukulele after playing a quick and sloppy 12th Street Rag. He was too scared to make a sound. He looked at it, front and back, and then handed it back to me without letting one string vibrate.

hoosierhiver
11-04-2014, 11:01 AM
I went to a "picker's party" a couple of months ago. When I showed up a fiddle player saw my case and asked "is that a mandolin?", I said "ukulele" and he instantly became disinterested. A couple of hours later I was leading the jam with my new buddy at my elbow.

IamNoMan
11-04-2014, 11:24 AM
I went to a "picker's party" a couple of months ago. When I showed up a fiddle player saw my case and asked "is that a mandolin?", I said "ukulele" and he instantly became disinterested. A couple of hours later I was leading the jam with my new buddy at my elbow.A buddy of mine Bob Pasquarello was known to walk up to and through the performers gate at folk festivals carrying a violin case. Inside was a copy of the "Rise Up Singing" songbook. When asked about what the violin case was for he always called it his Acapella Case.

SteveZ
11-04-2014, 11:34 AM
Ironically, have never had a problem with guitarists or any other instrument players, except a few other ukulele players. All of my stringed instruments, including ukuleles, are tuned in fifths. I like the sound and it's easier to transition from mandolin to tenor guitar to tenor banjo and now ukulele when all have the same tuning pattern. The "sound" is still instrument-unique. This seems to be no problem, in fact has been seen as quite logical to the guitarists, mandolinists and banjo players, yet has been treated as heresy and berated by a few ukulele traditionalists I've encountered.

How does one handle the raised eyebrows and bad vibes? Just write it off as tunnel-visioned ignorance. Can't remember who said it, but it rings true - "you can please all of the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, but you just can't please all of the people all of the time"

IamNoMan
11-04-2014, 11:44 AM
Ironically, have never had a problem with guitarists or any other instrument players, except a few other ukulele players. All of my stringed instruments, including ukuleles, are tuned in fifths. I like the sound and it's easier to transition from mandolin to tenor guitar to tenor banjo and now ukulele when all have the same tuning pattern. The "sound" is still instrument-unique. This seems to be no problem, in fact has been seen as quite logical to the guitarists, mandolinists and banjo players, yet has been treated as heresy and berated by a few ukulele traditionalists I've encountered.

How does one handle the raised eyebrows and bad vibes? Just write it off as tunnel-visioned ignorance. Can't remember who said it, but it rings true - "you can please all of the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, but you just can't please all of the people all of the time"I have a baritone uke but is is presently hors de combat When I could use it it was tuned in open or slack tuning like a banjo. I play the banjo and the ukulele. I do not understand the mystique of the Baritone uke. FOr me the banjo is a better substitute since it has a little more flexiblity. "I understand where you are coming from Steve"; he says as he raises an eyebrow and glares menacingly.

CeeJay
11-04-2014, 12:26 PM
Please..for the love of ...whatever deity you are currently making obeisance to ...is "slack" tuning ?....Slack means "less than tight" or "Loose" in the UK ...a slack string is a loose string and a slack woman is no better than she ought to be (?)....so please ...explain ....because to me the term Slack tuning sounds like a Uke with four elastic bands well inside the limit of their elastic escalation !!!!:p

Debby
11-04-2014, 12:45 PM
Please..for the love of ...whatever deity you are currently making obeisance to ...is "slack" tuning ?....Slack means "less than tight" or "Loose" in the UK ...a slack string is a loose string and a slack woman is no better than she ought to be (?)....so please ...explain ....because to me the term Slack tuning sounds like a Uke with four elastic bands well inside the limit of their elastic escalation !!!!:p

Open tuning, I think.

IamNoMan
11-04-2014, 12:55 PM
Slack tuning is indeed an open tuning, unless your playing a Dobro or Banjo where it is just an open tuning. Unless you are in Louisiana where Slack tuning indicate the fiddles strings are tuned down one whole tone D=C. Happy Guy Fawkes Day!

CeeJay
11-04-2014, 01:01 PM
Slack tuning is indeed an open tuning, unless your playing a Dobro or Banjo where it is just an open tuning. Unless you are in Louisiana where Slack tuning indicate the fiddles strings are tuned down one whole tone D=C. Happy Guy Fawkes Day!

Ah yes ..Guideo Fawkes ....quite possibly the last man to ever enter the Houses of Parliament with an honest intention.



Oh ...and your explanation helps ...in what way ???:p...........are you saying that my 5 string Banjer gDGBD (never on a scrabble rack please) is slack ?



grr

Sabantien
11-04-2014, 09:30 PM
A cheap toy ukulele got me hooked as well. It still has a fond place in my heart.

A local music store near my work sells entry level quality ukuleles and does not seem to take the product or ukulele players very seriously. I went in for strings and was told all ukulele strings are the same, just re-packaged. I had them order in a set of Aquila Reds for me just to broaden their horizons.

Oh that's a pity. I got my reds off the shelf. Last set they had, so I guess they're popular! I've been around to a few stores. One had only plastic ukes and a couple dolphins, but lots of books and very enthusiastic about ukes. Another had some very nice ukes, but were all about the guitars. It's nice to have found a good balance.

camperman
11-05-2014, 12:20 AM
We have one who comes to our meets. He's an accomplished guitarist of over 40years. He never stops playing and attention seeking while the guy leading is talking and trying to explain a new song or introduce one. Whenever there's a bit of a song to be sorted out or maybe doesn't flow quite the way it should he always refuses to help sort it out and always says "You wouldn't have this problem if you played a decent instrument instead of these useless ukuleles" Problem is he's a friend of the guy who runs the group so he doesn't get pulled up on it and people are starting to leave because of the disruption.
By the way I also know plenty of guitarists who are very keen uke devotees and more than willing to pass on their experience to uke players. Shame this guy isn't one of them.

KaraUkey
11-05-2014, 01:50 AM
We have one who comes to our meets. He's an accomplished guitarist of over 40years. He never stops playing and attention seeking while the guy leading is talking and trying to explain a new song or introduce one. Whenever there's a bit of a song to be sorted out or maybe doesn't flow quite the way it should he always refuses to help sort it out and always says "You wouldn't have this problem if you played a decent instrument instead of these useless ukuleles" Problem is he's a friend of the guy who runs the group so he doesn't get pulled up on it and people are starting to leave because of the disruption.
By the way I also know plenty of guitarists who are very keen uke devotees and more than willing to pass on their experience to uke players. Shame this guy isn't one of them.
“Instead of being presented with stereotypes by age, sex, color, class, or religion, +OR MUSICAL INSTRUMENT+ children must have the opportunity to learn that within each range, some people are loathsome and some are delightful.”
― Margaret Mead
Just a little edit to Margaret Mead's quote

Rllink
11-05-2014, 01:55 AM
I have a friend who took up "classical" guitar when he retired a few years ago. He is actually the one who got me interested in playing the ukulele. I have talked about him several times here. He doesn't put down my ukulele playing, but he makes it pretty obvious that what he is doing is serious. He is a serious guitar player. I suppose that if I were an insecure sort I could interpret that to mean that he does not think that my ukulele playing is serious even though he has never said as much. But I decided to take up the ukulele, because I was going to start playing the guitar, but hanging out with my friend convinced me that the guitar was way too serious for me, so I guess it is OK if he is a little snobbish. It reminds me why I took up the ukulele in the first place.

Debby
11-05-2014, 03:57 AM
I have a friend who took up "classical" guitar when he retired a few years ago. He is actually the one who got me interested in playing the ukulele. I have talked about him several times here. He doesn't put down my ukulele playing, but he makes it pretty obvious that what he is doing is serious. He is a serious guitar player. I suppose that if I were an insecure sort I could interpret that to mean that he does not think that my ukulele playing is serious even though he has never said as much. But I decided to take up the ukulele, because I was going to start playing the guitar, but hanging out with my friend convinced me that the guitar was way too serious for me, so I guess it is OK if he is a little snobbish. It reminds me why I took up the ukulele in the first place.

I hope someday you take up guitar too. Don't let one mans attitude keep you from finding joy in guitar. It's a delightful instrument. I played guitar for years.

I went into a musical slump a few years ago, and have not played much. My daughter came home and told me she joined a uke club and it caused us all to become interested in the ukulele. The ukulele has brought me out of a musical slump, and I am grateful. I hope to get back into guitar, but for now, I'm happy with the uke. I'll never give it up...I don't care what comments a "guitarist" thinks.

SteveZ
11-05-2014, 05:41 AM
I hope someday you take up guitar too. Don't let one mans attitude keep you from finding joy in guitar. It's a delightful instrument. I played guitar for years.

I went into a musical slump a few years ago, and have not played much. My daughter came home and told me she joined a uke club and it caused us all to become interested in the ukulele. The ukulele has brought me out of a musical slump, and I am grateful. I hope to get back into guitar, but for now, I'm happy with the uke. I'll never give it up...I don't care what comments a "guitarist" thinks.

I pretty much gave up on 6-string when I took up the mandolin, and it got me to try other stuff (tenor guitar, tenor banjo and ukulele). If the uke feels cool, but you miss the guitar sound, suggest giving tenor guitar a shot. It fulfills that hole really well for me, and old guitarists know what a sound difference (not better - different) a steel string has.

What I get a kick out of is the look on a musical purist's face when I take out a tenor uke (tuned CGDA) and rip out some rock stuff. This morning was doing some Eagles stuff (Heart Of The Matter, Heartache Tonight, Tequila Sunrise, Get Over It) on the back lanai. A couple "Sounds pretty good, but what kind of guitar is that?" comments ended with shocked looks when told the instrument was a ukulele. That "Arthur Godfrey" ukulele image may never leave some folk's perception, and that's their problem. To be honest, not that long ago I would not have believed that there were ukuleles in the marketplace which could be decent rock instruments.

ukulelekarcsi
11-06-2014, 02:17 AM
It has more to do with snobbery in general than with musical skills or choice of instrument. What I wanted to say, is that it can incur with otherwise very good musicians, and even with ukulele players. The times a song is deemed too easy or cheesy, even among ukulele players...

But it's said, recently by the great guitarist-as-well-as-ukulelist Del Rey, that guitarists in general like to show off, play flashy, compete, while ukulele players in general are the more 'song circle' kind.

Perhaps it really is character that motivates instrument choice. The reputation and accessibility of the ukulele (it takes less hours to start out) makes that most who chose it, are quite humble about their own skills, and therefore less inclined to look down on other instruments, musicians or even songs. A friend and I teach guitar and ukulele respectively, in a nearby university college, after hours. He has around as many young men as young women in his guitar group, while I have 2 guys against 21 women in the ukulele department. Either masculine players are more attracted by bigger instruments with more and harder strings, or I have better looks than my friend.

Stretch that theory, and theorbo-players must have the most chance of being extreme musical snobs. So that thesis probably doesn't fly either...

SteveZ
11-06-2014, 02:37 AM
It has more to do with snobbery in general than with musical skills or choice of instrument. What I wanted to say, is that it can incur with otherwise very good musicians, and even with ukulele players. The times a song is deemed too easy or cheesy, even among ukulele players...

But it's said, recently by the great guitarist-as-well-as-ukulelist Del Rey, that guitarists in general like to show off, play flashy, compete, while ukulele players in general are the more 'song circle' kind.

Perhaps it really is character that motivates instrument choice. The reputation and accessibility of the ukulele (it takes less hours to start out) makes that most who chose it, are quite humble about their own skills, and therefore less inclined to look down on other instruments, musicians or even songs. A friend and I teach guitar and ukulele respectively, in a nearby university college, after hours. He has around as many young men as young women in his guitar group, while I have 2 guys against 21 women in the ukulele department. Either masculine players are more attracted by bigger instruments with more and harder strings, or I have better looks than my friend.

Stretch that theory, and theorbo-players must have the most chance of being extreme musical snobs. So that thesis probably doesn't fly either...

Perhaps these are just two sharp guys who see the gender mix advantageously....

coolkayaker1
11-06-2014, 02:41 AM
As the ukulele's general popularity wanes, the guitarists will even more view us as plankton.

SteveZ
11-06-2014, 03:30 AM
As the ukulele's general popularity wanes, the guitarists will even more view us as plankton.

Perhaps. However, it may be more about the music and what's used to make it. Branding (great marketing term) affects popularity and impacts sales. When one says "guitar player" the popular images are 1) rock, 2) C & W (1 and 2 can be regionally reversed), 3) folk, and 4) all other genres. When one says "mandolin player" the popular image is bluegrass. For banjo, it's bluegrass, folk and country, respectively. When one says "ukuleke player" what really are the popular images? If ukulele is seen as mainly for Hawaiian, 20's-30's sing-along ballads and some old-time folk, then it's popularity is indeed at the mercy of a narrow genre grouping.

I've tried to get involved with a few ukulele groups, and frankly found the experience less than stellar. The "latest" song any of these groups would dare to attempt was Seeger's "This Land is Your Land" and they all recoiled at trying any rock/country stuff composed in the last two decades, no matter if the arrangements were 3-5 chords simplistic.

Ukulele as an instrument family is almost as complex as guitar. The number of sizes, shapes, available tuning, amplification systems available, tone woods, string compositions and such allow for quite a variety of musical uses. I've done a fair amount of experimentation so far (and a lot further to go!), and have found the ukulele a lot more musically versatile than currently used and/or discussed by most folk.

Wicked
11-06-2014, 08:38 AM
As the ukulele's general popularity wanes, the guitarists will even more view us as plankton.

I think it is the hype that is waning. The instrument has become just another tool in the musical toolbox... Which is a good thing, in my opinion.

Perhaps it will have the opposite effect... Perhaps ukulele players will be taken more seriously if the hype is gone. (Not that most of us would care, I think.)

stevepetergal
11-06-2014, 11:34 AM
Agreed. What Wicked says sounds right. As the hype lessens, we'll wait and see (and keep playing).

IamNoMan
11-06-2014, 02:00 PM
We have one who comes to our meets. He's an accomplished guitarist of over 40years. He never stops playing and attention seeking while the guy leading is talking and trying to explain a new song or introduce one. Whenever there's a bit of a song to be sorted out or maybe doesn't flow quite the way it should he always refuses to help sort it out and always says "You wouldn't have this problem if you played a decent instrument instead of these useless ukuleles" Problem is he's a friend of the guy who runs the group so he doesn't get pulled up on it and people are starting to leave because of the disruption.
By the way I also know plenty of guitarists who are very keen uke devotees and more than willing to pass on their experience to uke players. Shame this guy isn't one of them.Maybe you should get together with your disgruntled mates and start a new meet. Doesn't have to be nasty. Do it on a different night. Get a moderator to lead the meets who can handle the clown if He shows up. A good moderator can even make the trouble children aware of their problem and sometimes bring them around. Or make them known their behaviour is unwelcome.

When one says "ukuleke player" what really are the popular images? If ukulele is seen as mainly for Hawaiian, 20's-30's sing-along ballads and some old-time folk, then it's popularity is indeed at the mercy of a narrow genre grouping.My popular image of "ukulele player" consists of folks like Jake, and Marcy Marxer, yes and Tiny Tim, oh and Pat Lyons. Who's that you say. Pat is a mild mannered gal I usually sit next to at our 2nd Sunday Song Swap. She is not the most accomplished musician or singer. She has no stage presence to speak on and is very shy. She always has two or three excellent songs available that go way beyond the Kumbaya genre. And She is the person who turned me onto the possibilities of ukulele. We had our first meet-up since I bought a uke last month. During one of the breaks in her song we did a uke duet together. :cool: That's the kind of mercy I like to be at.



Ukulele as an instrument family is almost as complex as guitar. I've done a fair amount of experimentation so far... and have found the ukulele a lot more musically versatile than currently used and/or discussed by most folk.Amen to that.

SteveZ
11-06-2014, 03:15 PM
My popular image of "ukulele player" consists of folks like Jake, and Marcy Marxer, yes and Tiny Tim, oh and Pat Lyons. Who's that you say. ....

Your point is well taken. The ukulele may always be seen by many in the playing/listening world as a novelty until ukulele players are repeatedly heard/seen in the major broadcast media playing as an integral part of a name band. It's not as if a uke doesn't have a strong enough voice - my Pono Pro Classic can hold its own against most acoustic guitars. Many bands which use stringed instruments may have on stage several guitars (electric and acoustic) as well as a banjo and a mandolin, plus at least one bass (often two or three). Yet, how often is a ukulele among the stage stock? That lack of stage visibility affects whether many folk go guitar versus uke. You can ask your neighbor what instrument is associated with Santana" "Chet Atkins" or even "Chuck Berry" and probably get "guitar" as an answer without a strain. Yet, if you did that same with Jake or Izzy, what are the odds you'd get a "Jake who?" type response?

I have nothing but the greatest respect for these accomplished ukulele-musicians. It would be great to see a few of them do guest spots with folk such as Jimmy Buffett, Zac Brown, the Boston Pops or even One Direction, if only to show their musical skill with this underrated instrument can really enhance a performance. If such "duets" could be seen/heard by the general public, Kala and Martin would have to put on a second shift to handle the production requirements.

I still believe that the ukulele family of instruments provides a wide range of great voices, and can rock with the best of them.

Steve in Kent
11-07-2014, 12:39 AM
I have only been learning to play the ukulele for less than a year so I thought some lessons may be useful.

Contacted a guy recommended by my local music shop and one of the first things he said was "You know what they say about playing a ukulele instead of a guitar. It's like a brain surgeon deciding to be a butcher"

I just hung up at that point.

KaraUkey
11-07-2014, 12:45 AM
I have only been learning to play the ukulele for less than a year so I thought some lessons may be useful.

Contacted a guy recommended by my local music shop and one of the first things he said was "You know what they say about playing a ukulele instead of a guitar. It's like a brain surgeon deciding to be a butcher"

I just hung up at that point.
Correct move. He would have been, and undoubtedly is, a totally useless teacher, of anything!

SteveZ
11-07-2014, 02:12 AM
I have only been learning to play the ukulele for less than a year so I thought some lessons may be useful.

Contacted a guy recommended by my local music shop and one of the first things he said was "You know what they say about playing a ukulele instead of a guitar. It's like a brain surgeon deciding to be a butcher"

I just hung up at that point.

I wouldn't want the guy as a guitar instructor, either. With his attitude, his lead teaching song must be "I am a rock" because he must spend a lot of time alone.

Kmcmichael
11-07-2014, 11:17 AM
I have been playing guitar for 40 years, uke for one. I have done enough rude stuff in my life that the world will never get even! I guess I would not care.

Kmcmichael
11-07-2014, 11:18 AM
Actually I think a uke will help a guitar player with transpositions.

brUKEman
11-16-2014, 03:59 PM
I always tell people a Guitar has 6 strings, a Ukulele has 4 Strings & I have 5 fingers. I like the odds better with a ukulele.
Also, I do open mics and playing the ukulele I always stand out and get noticed a lot more than mediocre guitar players.

bunnyf
11-16-2014, 04:49 PM
My town has a weekly jam in one of our parks called "Guitar Army". While guitars prevail there are a variety of instruments present. I am the lone uke, however. I am teased a bit every week with comments like "When are you gonna take the training wheels off and get a guitar?". Most of the guitarists are much better players than me, so I take their comments in stride. The group is welcoming though but there is no doubt that they believe that the guitar is far superior. I don't try to convince anyone. I just do my own thing. I tend to play a more eclectic mix of music, crossing more genres and decades, including contemporary, so I'm not competing with them in their 60s folk/rock dominated world, tho I do break out some Dylan or Neil Young once in a while.

Rllink
11-17-2014, 04:35 AM
I hope someday you take up guitar too. Don't let one mans attitude keep you from finding joy in guitar. It's a delightful instrument. I played guitar for years.

I went into a musical slump a few years ago, and have not played much. My daughter came home and told me she joined a uke club and it caused us all to become interested in the ukulele. The ukulele has brought me out of a musical slump, and I am grateful. I hope to get back into guitar, but for now, I'm happy with the uke. I'll never give it up...I don't care what comments a "guitarist" thinks.It isn't just my friend's seriousness that led me to the ukulele over the guitar. One thing is size. A concert ukulele fits in my suitcase, a guitar has to be lugged around. A ukulele fits in my back pack or my bicycle pannier, a guitar doesn't. So size has a lot to do with it. But my friend's seriousness, and my desire to not do something so serious, had a lot to do with pushing me away from guitar and toward the ukulele to start with. The one thing though, I've found plenty of that same thing with ukulele players, which I have actually learned to find amusing rather than annoying. In fact, I do serious guitar player parodies with my uke for my few guitar playing friends. Most of them think they are hilarious and they will always know someone who they think acts like my parody, but they don't realize that I'm actually imitating those snobbish serious ukulele players I've run into, not guitar players. So I guess my point is, snobbishness is not confined to guitar players.

Anyway, as far as learning to play the guitar, I don't see that in my future. The ukulele keeps me occupied enough. I play my uke probably an hour or two every day, throughout the day. I just don't want to throw another instrument into it. I feel like they would both suffer from the experience. I would just like to keep it simple. I have thought about learning to play the cuatro. In Puerto Rico the cuatro is a very popular instrument, but once you get out of Puerto Rico and back to the states, not so much though. But they have a place close by my apartment in San Juan that sells them and has both group, and individual lessons. I go by there on a Saturday afternoon and there will be thirty people all sitting out there taking a group lesson. They even have percussionists to accompany them. It looks like fun, but it is the same thing as the guitar, it would just be something else to take away from my ukulele playing time. But actually, they also have pandero de plena lessons, a small hand held drum used in plena music, which I think that my wife and I will take in January. That also looks like fun. It would be an entirely different instrument, and I'm thinking that it might help me with my rhythm, so I could see it as something to improve my ukulele playing.

Coconut Willie
11-17-2014, 04:52 AM
No, and I could really care less, I am having fun and making some type of music!!!

Fleapluckin_Flapper
11-17-2014, 08:17 AM
Honestly,as a teen (many many years ago) I was one of those. Only uke I'd ever been exposed to was the banjo uke that had belonged to my grandmother that was hanging on the wall in my family's living room. I'd never heard one played. I was one of those who took myself way too seriously when it came to music mainly due to being insecure. In essence,there was nothing you could've told me then that would've gotten me to think any differently. I guess my main point is I've found life goes much easier when you simply allow folks to think as they will. So I don't bother with those types of folks. Keeps me from getting frustrated and it's not my job to intentionally change people's minds. My Dad thought the uke was a mere toy and couldn't believe I had gotten into the instrument until he heard the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain. His opinion of ukes changed 180 once he heard them. :D

Rllink
11-18-2014, 08:53 AM
My guitar playing friends, and I don't have a lot of guitar playing friends in the first place, they are not really snobs in the sense that they make fun of my ukulele, they are just so serious and full of themselves. That's all I'm saying. But then, like I've said many times before, I have ukulele friends who are much the same, and they are playing ukuleles. That, to me, is funny.

Ukuleleblues
11-18-2014, 01:17 PM
Lack of pretense and snobbery was refreshing in the uke world when I started playing in 2004 (I played only guitar before). Folks that look down on the uke are usually not the kind of folks that I want to spend my time with. It's become a kind of litmus test for buttheads for me.

Folks that are turned off by the uke usually are rather uptight, tend to be materialistic, mean, uneducated and very dependent on being part of the "group".

While on the other hand folks that like the uke tend to be friendly, secure, outgoing, positive, independent and educated. I wish I could pull out my uke and play a song when I meet folks to ID the ones to avoid.

Now if that isn't a gross oversimplification of people I don't know what is :)

CeeJay
11-20-2014, 03:26 PM
Hah, there are enough Ukulele owners who are snobs about ukuleles ...leave the poor misguided guitarists out of it, at least they don't know any better.....:nana::uhoh:

Andy Chen
11-20-2014, 03:37 PM
Nice one, CeeJay!

Wicked
11-21-2014, 03:41 AM
Hah, there are enough Ukulele owners who are snobs about ukuleles ...leave the poor misguided guitarists out of it, at least they don't know any better.....:nana::uhoh:

Sadly, you are correct, CeeJay.