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strumsilly
06-29-2014, 11:03 AM
I bought one of the Rondo [Omega] ubass clones that were offered at $140 shipped last week. I have been fooling around with it . How do you ubassers mute the strings to keep them ringing. looks like this guy is using his palm[ or is he using other fingers?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PjpXrXFI8c&index=4&list=RDCLfaZyljThU

bnolsen
06-29-2014, 11:18 AM
looks like it follows normal bass techniques. for fingerstyle (which is what you'll use on a ubass), there's floating thumb technque which pretty much mutes your lower strings for free. The upper strings you learn how to mute those with your fretting hand.

Anchored thumb technique i'm not sure about yet since only very recently have i been getting forced into using that for very fast string hops.

A lot of this gets to be much easier with practice. Even with the smaller scale ubass i suggest playing through the hal leonard bass books that comes with cd's, I got mine for under 15usd at amazon and the skills in the first book definitely is all playable on ubass, even the 1-2-4 fingering that I suggest trying to maintain on ubass.

strumsilly
06-29-2014, 02:37 PM
floating thumb?

PhilUSAFRet
06-29-2014, 09:44 PM
The light touch required is hard for many to get used to. Some standard bass players hate it. Here's a nice closeup demo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLfaZyljThU

bassfiddlesteve should be around shortly and can answer any technical player's questions you have. I took a short workshop from him at the Tampa Bay Uke Festival last year.

bnolsen
06-30-2014, 02:43 AM
The light touch required is hard for many to get used to. Some standard bass players hate it. Here's a nice closeup demo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLfaZyljThU

For electric bass if you need more volume turn up your amp! I'm finding its easier to get aches and pains from the higher tension steel strings...tweaking the action as low as possible is important. Not as much a problem with the ubass. You won't get a rock sound off a ubass, although maybe a pedal might help there.

Gottliver
07-07-2014, 03:23 AM
Although great for upright and long scale electric, as the 3rd and 4th fingers work together to help eliminate strain, the light tension and short scale of the UBass allows for stress free 1 2 3 4 fretting. Take advantage of the dexterity this allows!!



looks like it follows normal bass techniques. for fingerstyle (which is what you'll use on a ubass), there's floating thumb technque which pretty much mutes your lower strings for free. The upper strings you learn how to mute those with your fretting hand.

Anchored thumb technique i'm not sure about yet since only very recently have i been getting forced into using that for very fast string hops.

A lot of this gets to be much easier with practice. Even with the smaller scale ubass i suggest playing through the hal leonard bass books that comes with cd's, I got mine for under 15usd at amazon and the skills in the first book definitely is all playable on ubass, even the 1-2-4 fingering that I suggest trying to maintain on ubass.

bnolsen
07-07-2014, 04:57 AM
Although great for upright and long scale electric, as the 3rd and 4th fingers work together to help eliminate strain, the light tension and short scale of the UBass allows for stress free 1 2 3 4 fretting. Take advantage of the dexterity this allows!!

It all depends on whether or not you want to move between playing long/short scale bass and ubass. I personally don't want to pick up any bad lazy habits myself.

Magoosan
07-10-2014, 10:21 AM
I've had my ubass for about a year. Played electric bass many years ago but have only used upright since I got the ubass. With the ubass you learn to mute with the fretting hand. In terms of the floating thumb I was concerned with that at first. My earlier electric bass had a thumb rest and I thought I would need that. With time on the ubass I found it comfortable to lightly rest my thumb on the E string as I normally only use that string ocasionally. When I do use it, I just lift off the thumb. It's just a matter of practice and feeling comfortable with it.

strumsilly
07-10-2014, 10:49 AM
thanks, I'm getting better at muting with the fretting hand. I bought an SUB too, I was having so much fun with the Rondo [Haeden? Omega?] clone.

bnolsen
07-10-2014, 01:46 PM
but you know you really need a short scale bass to try just for fun. This hobby is a bit more expensive than ukuleles.

Gottliver
07-17-2014, 03:36 AM
It all depends on whether or not you want to move between playing long/short scale bass and ubass. I personally don't want to pick up any bad lazy habits myself.

Understood!! But it the 1-2-3-4 fretting on a long scale bass is the widely accepted standard these days. 1-2-4 is generally used by upright bassists who double in electric. Of course the beauty of music is anything goes so long as it sounds good!!!!

strumsilly
07-17-2014, 04:09 AM
It all depends on whether or not you want to move between playing long/short scale bass and ubass. I personally don't want to pick up any bad lazy habits myself.
I don't mind bad habits, as long as it sounds good. I'm a member of the whatever works [and sounds good]camp. I really don't plan on ever getting a "real " bass either, now that I have 2 uke sized basses.

Gottliver
07-19-2014, 10:17 AM
I don't mind bad habits, as long as it sounds good. I'm a member of the whatever works [and sounds good]camp. I really don't plan on ever getting a "real " bass either, now that I have 2 uke sized basses.

Well said!