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fromeast2west
07-01-2014, 07:18 AM
I'm making my first attempt at inlay and having some trouble.

The instructions I'm trying to follow say to glue the two layers of veneer with rubber cement. I picked up a bottle of Elmer's brand (hey, it worked on craft projects when I was seven, so I figured it would be OK).

I've tried a few ways to try to get it to work, and it just doesn't reliably hold the veneer layers together. I tried putting glue on just one surface and then pressing together; glue on both; letting them tack up a bit, and also trying to press them together as quickly as possible.

Is there a trick I'm missing, or should I be using a different glue? I'm afraid that using anything stronger will make separating the veneers without breaking them a real chore.

Thanks

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
07-01-2014, 07:29 AM
I don't know what materials you are trying to glue together but many people use rubber cement. I don't use it though. If I need to cut two pieces of shell at the same time I will put a piece of paper between the two pieces that I've lightly spread some PVA glue on. The paper sticks the two together and they easily come apart and clean up quickly (plop them in a bowl of water). If it's wood you're trying to glue up, a couple of drops of Duco cement works for me or even a couple of well placed drops of medium CA on the waste area.
What instructions are you trying to follow?

fromeast2west
07-01-2014, 09:58 AM
I'm just working with two sheets of wood veneer in contrasting color. Most of the process so far is just based off a bunch of instrucables and youtube videos.

With the Duco cement, do you add any to the actual areas to be inlayed, or just to the waste area? Do you have to do anything special to keep more delicate parts of the inlay work area from squirming around while you cut them? I'm trying to do the profile of a tropic bird for a headstock veneer, so the wing and beak areas are going to be pretty slender. I'm not even going to bother with the long tail feathers as an inlay. I'll just cut narrow slots in the darker veneer and fill with a white maple dust and glue mix.

Kekani
07-01-2014, 10:12 AM
Robinson.

Then, Laskin.

In my opinion.

hawaii 50
07-01-2014, 01:06 PM
Robinson.

Then, Laskin.

In my opinion.

for ukes I like
Moore Bettah,Robinson and A. Oya...haha :) take care brother

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
07-01-2014, 01:17 PM
Robinson.

Then, Laskin.

In my opinion.

Aside from being exceptionally skillful artists and way beyond anything I could ever achieve, I find them both too gaudy, especially Laskin. I think Robinson is mostly commission so I blame the commissioner for his opulence.

Now, if they were Gaudi, that would be different (architectural joke)

Chuck Moore is my favourite inlay artist that ive seen to date. His scrimshaw is far above anything ive ever seen on any instrument.

Kekani
07-02-2014, 01:09 PM
Aside from being exceptionally skillful artists and way beyond anything I could ever achieve, I find them both too gaudy, especially Laskin. I think Robinson is mostly commission so I blame the commissioner for his opulence.

Now, if they were Gaudi, that would be different (architectural joke)

Chuck Moore is my favourite inlay artist that ive seen to date. His scrimshaw is far above anything ive ever seen on any instrument.

Agree.

Caveat: I mention those names only as a reference to the op. I can point out two pivotal times for inlay, for me. The 2nd was when I went through Laskin's book (which I still go through). The first is the 45 minutes I spent one on one with Robinson. Pivotal, for me.

hawaii 50
07-02-2014, 01:14 PM
Agree.

Caveat: I mention those names only as a reference to the op. I can point out two pivotal times for inlay, for me. The 2nd was when I went through Laskin's book (which I still go through). The first is the 45 minutes I spent one on one with Robinson. Pivotal, for me.



no wonder you so good Aaron...:)

you know that Larry Robinson worked for my pal Rick Turner many years ago in the 60's-70's....Rick has a hand in so much...

Kekani
07-02-2014, 04:43 PM
no wonder you so good Aaron...:)

you know that Larry Robinson worked for my pal Rick Turner many years ago in the 60's-70's....Rick has a hand in so much...

I name dropped Rick (with his approval) to start the conversation with Larry. Went something like:
Rick suggested I come down and talk to you.
"You know Rick?"
Yeah.
"He's a giant among men."

Also humble, both of them, and I got both their sigs on my copy of Larry's book. Rick was kinda like "are you kidding" but I still got it. He did the intro if anyone didn't know.

hawaii 50
07-02-2014, 04:52 PM
I name dropped Rick (with his approval) to start the conversation with Larry. Went something like:
Rick suggested I come down and talk to you.
"You know Rick?"
Yeah.
"He's a giant among men."

Also humble, both of them, and I got both their sigs on my copy of Larry's book. Rick was kinda like "are you kidding" but I still got it. He did the intro if anyone didn't know.

Great story Aaron...you know that Rick takes credit for giving Larry his start....which he did...but Larry did most of it on his own....I think...:)

even though they give Rick a hard time on the UU he is a great luthier and super nice guy...I am always his fan!
have to meet him face to face and spend some time with him to know....

see you at the Festival....