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Mattyukaholic
07-18-2014, 05:09 AM
Hi everyone,

All this talk of Glen Rose jazz ukulele lessons on another thread got me thinking..

Does anyone know of one collection of jazz standards in one book for ukulele? I'd like it with good ukulele four note jazz chords rather than simplified three note chords like in the Ukulele Playlist purple book.

I know about Ian Chadwick's DVD but I don't want to have to go through 2000 songs, just thinking some really nice jazz standards.

In a Mike Lynch video he mentions that Glen Rose has a collection of jazz standards but I can't find it anywhere on his website (only the tuition books).

Thanks for any help,
Matt

SailingUke
07-18-2014, 05:21 AM
Hi everyone,

All this talk of Glen Rose jazz ukulele lessons on another thread got me thinking..

Does anyone know of one collection of jazz standards in one book for ukulele? I'd like it with good ukulele four note jazz chords rather than simplified three note chords like in the Ukulele Playlist purple book.

I know about Ian Chadwick's DVD but I don't want to have to go through 2000 songs, just thinking some really nice jazz standards.

In a Mike Lynch video he mentions that Glen Rose has a collection of jazz standards but I can't find it anywhere on his website (only the tuition books).

Thanks for any help,
Matt

James Hill and Craig Brandau each have great ukulele jazz books out.

brimmer
07-18-2014, 05:37 AM
Glen Rose doesn't have a book of jazz standards. His approach is to teach you to play lead sheets from regular (non-uke) jazz fakebooks. This means you will have to learn to play those tunes without the uke chord boxes. Glen suggests a number of fakebooks. His approach is worthwhile but more challenging that just playing from music published for uke, like Jim Beloff's books, which have the chord diagrams for uke.

There is also Dr Uke's website. He has many jazz standards on there with the uke chords, but not in book format.

http://www.doctoruke.com/songs.html

Let us know if you find anything else.

Wicked
07-18-2014, 05:42 AM
Here are a few arrangements that I whipped up for a recent jazz-centric jam. Not many, but it should get you going.

http://files.meetup.com/1634379/Jazz%20Me%20Up%20final.pdf

Luke El U
07-18-2014, 05:58 AM
If one really wants to play Jazz, no matter what instrument is played, a clear understanding of harmony is needed.
People who play jazz immediately know what is meant by chord symbols like Eb-7b5 or GM9/B, and they know where those chords, inversions or substitutions are on their instrument. It takes some time to learn that new language, but once you learn it, your playing will sound authentically creative and free.

Mattyukaholic
07-18-2014, 06:20 AM
Thanks everyone. This is both daunting and exciting. I was worried my playing was reaching a plateau. It seems like jazz is opening up a whole new universe of playing. I'd never quite got the hang of fake books etc but I'm going to start from scratch.

Kimosabe
07-18-2014, 06:33 AM
Glen's first two books each have ten standards per book and great ones. He gives the starting note for singing but not the standard notation. That would involve copyright infringement. You also must apply the lyrics but it doesn't take much effort to do so. The first two books give a very solid foundation.

Tommy B
07-18-2014, 06:33 AM
I've tried learning some jazz tunes from the two Lyle Ritz jazz books. I find the blue one way beyond my abilities, however. But the orange book, just called "Jazz," has a great selection of jazz standards with lush-sounding arrangements for the uke. I find that book challenging too, but it's a little less so. And it's so rewarding to work through a tune in that book. His chords sound complex and rich. By the way, it has both gCEA and dGBE chord diagrams. There's also the Ohta San book of the same series. It, too, has great standards, but I don't find his chords as interesting as Ritz's.

Wicked
07-18-2014, 06:37 AM
Thanks everyone. This is both daunting and exciting. I was worried my playing was reaching a plateau. It seems like jazz is opening up a whole new universe of playing. I'd never quite got the hang of fake books etc but I'm going to start from scratch.

Don't be intimidated by jazz... Especially on the ukulele. Because you only have four strings, playing extended chords requires you to leave some notes out of the chord. As a result, many chord shapes will be repeatedly used - but will represent different chords.

For example, 2,3,3,3 can stand in for Cm6, Am7b5 and F9 (among others). So, a very simple chord shape ends up sounding super "jazzy."

One note regarding Dr. Uke's arrangements... They are a good starting point, but he almost always uses first position voicings for all of the chords. He does this for simplicity, but most often, an easier or better sounding progression can be achieved more easily further up the neck.

Tommy B
07-18-2014, 06:46 AM
Hi everyone,

All this talk of Glen Rose jazz ukulele lessons on another thread got me thinking..




Could some kind person point me to the Glen Rose thread? I can't seem to find it, and I've been contemplating buying his beginner package.

sonomajazz
07-18-2014, 06:46 AM
My personal jazz uke learning method includes Glenn Rose and Dr. Uke...If you get through this material you've done a lot and are well on your way to being a decent jazz player. Dr Uke is great because you can "hear" the chord changes and the rhythm in the audio files...very helpful!

Kimosabe
07-18-2014, 07:01 AM
For Glen Rose:

http://www.jazzyukulele.com

Mattyukaholic
07-18-2014, 07:59 AM
Could some kind person point me to the Glen Rose thread? I can't seem to find it, and I've been contemplating buying his beginner package.

Hiya, wasn't so much a whole thread, but it a came up here:

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?98853-Is-it-me-or-does-this-seem-like-sloppy-math

Mattyukaholic
07-18-2014, 08:02 AM
One note regarding Dr. Uke's arrangements... They are a good starting point, but he almost always uses first position voicings for all of the chords. He does this for simplicity, but most often, an easier or better sounding progression can be achieved more easily further up the neck.

I wonders if that was the case. I often prefer the fmaj7 chord up the fretboard as played in a lot of Ohta San pieces but noticed he was always using the first position version.

Thanks for the good advice re jazz too. I'm genuinely excited to get stuck in.

Mattyukaholic
07-18-2014, 08:05 AM
Thanks for all the good advice. I've got the Lyle Ritz and Herb Ohta books. They're two of my all time favourite artists. I completely found the same thing with the Lyle Ritz books. The blue one will take some working up to.

I'm going to work through the Glen Rose PDFs. Though I know most of the chords already the important thing for me is learning to fit them altogether in patterns and he's great at explaining the best progressions etc.

iamesperambient
07-18-2014, 08:22 AM
Hi everyone,

All this talk of Glen Rose jazz ukulele lessons on another thread got me thinking..

Does anyone know of one collection of jazz standards in one book for ukulele? I'd like it with good ukulele four note jazz chords rather than simplified three note chords like in the Ukulele Playlist purple book.

I know about Ian Chadwick's DVD but I don't want to have to go through 2000 songs, just thinking some really nice jazz standards.

In a Mike Lynch video he mentions that Glen Rose has a collection of jazz standards but I can't find it anywhere on his website (only the tuition books).

Thanks for any help,
Matt

at this moment in time im attempting to learn lyle ritz songs.
I'm doing ok learning jazz but understanding the break down of how
the theory works i will be honest a bit confused to some degree.
I honestly have been learning by listening and watching but i want
to get to the point where i can understand how it works better.

SailingUke
07-18-2014, 08:35 AM
I forgot about this one.
They start with some Doc Uke and add jazz chords and inversions.

http://www.ukulelejass.com/arrangements.html

NewKid
07-18-2014, 08:36 AM
The great insight for me from Glen Rose was to understand the series of chords in a Jazz song - what Kimo Hussey calls a musical sentence. The nice thing about these songs is they often sound wonderful in different tempos.

For amazing Jazz uke instruction you can Skype lessons from Ms. Sarah Maisel.

iamesperambient
07-18-2014, 08:36 AM
I forgot about this one.
They start with some Doc Uke and add jazz chords and inversions.

http://www.ukulelejass.com/arrangements.html

thanks ! bookmarked this one.

Mattyukaholic
07-18-2014, 09:26 AM
Here are a few arrangements that I whipped up for a recent jazz-centric jam. Not many, but it should get you going.

http://files.meetup.com/1634379/Jazz%20Me%20Up%20final.pdf

This is BRILLIANT! Thank you.

Mattyukaholic
07-18-2014, 09:27 AM
I forgot about this one.
They start with some Doc Uke and add jazz chords and inversions.

http://www.ukulelejass.com/arrangements.html

This is great. Thanks so much.

ukemunga
07-18-2014, 11:35 AM
Don't know if this one has been posted yet:

http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/jazz-standards-chords/

NewKid
07-18-2014, 04:00 PM
Here's my favorite Lyle Ritz arrangement on my Boat Paddle ML-Tenor.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNXyzY1JzOk&feature=youtu.be

Jim Hanks
07-18-2014, 04:51 PM
Very nice NewKid. Thanks for this thread all - lots of good resources I didn't know about.

coolkayaker1
07-18-2014, 05:52 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZG8yREUJL6s

A fun progression that I'm working on now from Corey and Andrew at HMS.

There's also a Fly Me To The Moon Toot by Aaron for those so motivated.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jh2KRNrp77Y

Dan Uke
07-19-2014, 04:56 AM
Here's my favorite Lyle Ritz arrangement on my Boat Paddle ML-Tenor.

Wow Don, you're playing is really smooth. Thanks for sharing

tbeltrans
07-19-2014, 07:27 AM
NewKid -

That was very, very nice playing!

Tony

Kimosabe
07-19-2014, 08:08 AM
Simply divine.

NewKid
07-19-2014, 12:30 PM
Thanks for the kind comments Jim, Dan, Tony, and Kimosabe.

Don

Mattyukaholic
07-19-2014, 12:51 PM
Don't know if this one has been posted yet:

http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/jazz-standards-chords/

Thanks Fred.

Mattyukaholic
07-19-2014, 12:52 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZG8yREUJL6s

A fun progression that I'm working on now from Corey and Andrew at HMS.

There's also a Fly Me To The Moon Toot by Aaron for those so motivated.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jh2KRNrp77Y

These are great. Thanks Steve. Thanks everyone. So many fun things to try!!

Mattyukaholic
07-19-2014, 12:54 PM
Here's my favorite Lyle Ritz arrangement on my Boat Paddle ML-Tenor.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNXyzY1JzOk&feature=youtu.be

What a gorgeous ukulele and you make it sound beautiful.

brimmer
07-19-2014, 01:02 PM
Newkid, that's a lovely uke and a nice performance, too!

JoeJazz2000
10-18-2014, 01:53 PM
Don't be intimidated by jazz... Especially on the ukulele. Because you only have four strings, playing extended chords requires you to leave some notes out of the chord. As a result, many chord shapes will be repeatedly used - but will represent different chords.

For example, 2,3,3,3 can stand in for Cm6, Am7b5 and F9 (among others). So, a very simple chord shape ends up sounding super "jazzy."

One note regarding Dr. Uke's arrangements... They are a good starting point, but he almost always uses first position voicings for all of the chords. He does this for simplicity, but most often, an easier or better sounding progression can be achieved more easily further up the neck.

I agree, sometimes there are better sounding chord voicings nearby. But, his changes are sound, and his passing chords are very good. That said, some of his chords can be omitted without any harm. I would add, to the poster that remarked on Dr Uke's first position F Maj 7, I agree that's an uncomfortable stretch for a strumming chord, but always check to see if a Maj, a 6th, or a 6/9 could substitute. Usually a regular major will do.

I've learned some great arrangements form Dr Uke. It's a great resource.

Wicked
10-18-2014, 03:33 PM
I agree, sometimes there are better sounding chord voicings nearby. But, his changes are sound, and his passing chords are very good. That said, some of his chords can be omitted without any harm. I would add, to the poster that remarked on Dr Uke's first position F Maj 7, I agree that's an uncomfortable stretch for a strumming chord, but always check to see if a Maj, a 6th, or a 6/9 could substitute. Usually a regular major will do.

I've learned some great arrangements form Dr Uke. It's a great resource.

Don't get me wrong... I completely agree that Dr Uke's harmonic arrangements are excellent. I believe that he posts them with first position voicings so that they are less intimidating to the majority of players - but I wouldn't be surprised if he personally used more logical voicings further up the neck.

I use his arrangements fairly often... I just rework the voicings to meet my needs.

ubulele
10-18-2014, 04:20 PM
One note regarding Dr. Uke's arrangements... They are a good starting point, but he almost always uses first position voicings for all of the chords. He does this for simplicity, but most often, an easier or better sounding progression can be achieved more easily further up the neck.

Yes! Not only do you get a richer variety of voicings when you play in various positions on the neck, you can "chop" the chords more easily by just releasing pressure with your fretting hand. It makes a huge, instant improvement in your expressive technique.

IamNoMan
10-18-2014, 04:42 PM
This is a nice collection of Torch songs. Its geared towards piano, guitar and voice and not ukulele. I is accessible to those of us not yet clearly versed in harmony.

http://www.ejazzlines.com/BEST-TORCH-SONGS-EVER-p49453.html

@Wicked: nice collection:

UK/UKELIST
12-24-2014, 10:49 AM
I use the Glen Rose method and have recently downloaded the first course/Package from the internet.
I have long been intimidated by all this G minor 9th with an augmented 47th stuff. Although I do actually have a knowledge of harmony, in my honest opinion it is NOT necessary to have a thorough knowledge of jazz harmonization to play some jazzy sounding stuff. As Glen explains, it is done by using CHORD PATTERNS.
In fact he deliberately leaves the names of the chords OUT to start off with as he knows it makes people shudder at the complexity of it all. ( And then give up)
I know a dammned good pedal steel guitarist here in the UK that cannot read music and does not know the name of one chord from another. He plays beautifully and has been described as a fine musician. What is more important is that you should know the type of sound you are trying to emulate and KNOW when a certain chord structure SOUNDS wrong so you can correct it.
Meanwhile, yes....I would welcome an awesome book with 50 of the most sought after jazz toons with Uke chords.
Sorry...by the way , just look up Glen Rose Jazzy Ukelele on Google and that should do it.

Kimosabe
12-25-2014, 06:37 AM
Here are a few arrangements that I whipped up for a recent jazz-centric jam. Not many, but it should get you going.

http://files.meetup.com/1634379/Jazz%20Me%20Up%20final.pdf

Thanks a lot. any chance you could do a video or two of you performing them?

stevepetergal
12-25-2014, 06:51 AM
I like the Lyle Ritz books.

UK/UKELIST
01-09-2015, 11:58 PM
I had thought about doing a short vid but restrained because I remember reading a thread about" as soon as people learn something they whack it on you tube whether it's ghastly or not!!..".Okay I will be brave and do a short vid on the sort of chord progression Glen teaches. Will I get into trouble from Glen though?...Things are so complicated these days.
Pete.

TheBadRabbit
09-11-2015, 08:49 AM
Here is a very interesting Trad Jazz blog by a "grumpy, very old guy" in England. He presents nearly two dozen "standard" jazz progressions and the songs in which they appear. The progressions are presented using the Nashville numbering system so you can easily transpose them to any key you like.

http://playing-traditional-jazz.blogspot.com/search/label/Chord%20progressions

lakesideglenn
09-11-2015, 02:46 PM
Nice find Rabbit...there is a wealth of info and links to a great bunch of videos if you dig around!
Thanks for sharing!
Cheers!

BearMakingNoises
09-11-2015, 02:59 PM
I have Ukulele Jazz by Kiyoshi Kobayashi. Not sure if it is available overseas but it is great. Excellent arrangement and comes with a CD of the songs.

barefootgypsy
09-11-2015, 11:26 PM
Here is a very interesting Trad Jazz blog by a "grumpy, very old guy" in England. He presents nearly two dozen "standard" jazz progressions and the songs in which they appear. The progressions are presented using the Nashville numbering system so you can easily transpose them to any key you like.

http://playing-traditional-jazz.blogspot.com/search/label/Chord%20progressionsAbsolutely brilliant link there, thanks so much for this! I shall make sure I don't lose it - so useful if you love those old tunes and want to build your musical skill set.....

Mattyukaholic
09-11-2015, 11:54 PM
Thanks so much everyone. I've found these links really enlightening.

TheBadRabbit
09-17-2015, 08:04 AM
Glad to share with everyone. This blog has a wealth of ideas on listening to, performing, and appreciating traditional jazz. So much of it can be easily translated to the uke. If you haven't yet, check out any of the Tuba Skinny videos. I have three of their CDs and they never fail to put a smile on my face.