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keithy351
02-17-2009, 06:12 AM
g'day guys, since i travel around alot for work and studying reasons, i always take my uke with me, the concert fits right in my back pack no worries, how would you go takeing a tenor uke, in a case on the plane with ya, i would have it stashed in my backpack again, but will proberly me sticking out a bit, would they kick up shit?? also whats the best way to travel with it, put it in a case then wrap the case in bubble wrap????

Fred Miu
02-17-2009, 06:16 AM
i take my tenor uke when i travel all the time. i have a case for it and i just bring it with me. i get no problems with it, people always smile at me.

no need for buble wrap if its with you as a carry on. SHOOTS do what i do, ive played on the plane a few times.

hoosierhiver
02-17-2009, 06:19 AM
When I was boarding,I once had the pilot ask me if I was gonna play during the flight.I told him I didn't want to get thrown out of the plane.:D

NukeDOC
02-17-2009, 06:21 AM
another question on top of this...

with the cabin being pressurized, is it ok then to have it carried on, or is it advisable to loosen the strings to avoid over tension on the neck like it would in the cargo hold?

deach
02-17-2009, 06:25 AM
...people always smile at me.

...

Maybe your zipper was down.

cpatch
02-17-2009, 06:29 AM
You're allowed one carry-on bag and one personal item...the uke in its case qualifies as a personal item (as long as it fits in the overhead bin) so you can just carry it separately.

Fred Miu
02-17-2009, 06:49 AM
another question on top of this...

with the cabin being pressurized, is it ok then to have it carried on, or is it advisable to loosen the strings to avoid over tension on the neck like it would in the cargo hold?

geez i never thought of that. i havent had any problems coming from Hawaii to Cali or from TN to Cali. but i think it would be best to loosen the strings down 2 steps JUST in case. i think i shall start doing that now.


Maybe your zipper was down.

dag nabit Deach, i thought i saw you with a huge grin my last flight! it was down huh?

NatalieS
02-17-2009, 06:56 AM
I think your uke should be just fine, as long as you carry it on with you, as others have said. This was discussed in a thread a while back and the general concensus was to avoid checking it as baggage at all costs!

psesinkclee
02-17-2009, 07:09 AM
I brought a concert uke with me recently from Jersey to Joburg, South Africa.

There shouldn't be any need to tune down, unless you have wound strings.



P.S. - The Stewardesses asked me to play for them, so I wen;t back tot he galley a few times during the flight (18hours haha) and entertained them. We had a good time :)

Leisureclub
02-17-2009, 07:23 AM
While I probably wouldnt bring a tenor on a plane with no case, I've found that there are no problems fitting a tenor case in the overhead bins.

As long as your uke is in a case, you'll be fine. They will want you to send it through the x-ray machine but it's all good.

My case is a little too long to fit in the box thing they have for spatial reference around the airports but that wasn't a problem with me the one time I've flown with my uke.

cpatch
02-17-2009, 07:25 AM
with the cabin being pressurized, is it ok then to have it carried on, or is it advisable to loosen the strings to avoid over tension on the neck like it would in the cargo hold?
Both the cabin and the cargo hold are pressurized (to 8,000 feet) and heated (although the cargo hold is usually slightly cooler than the cabin, depending on whether or not animals are being transported). If anyone can explain to me the physics that dictates how that kind of pressure change is going to have any effect on uke or guitar strings I'd love to hear it. If anything, it would seem to me that having the strings detuned for the length of the flight is going to do more damage to the neck than any change in air pressure. On the other hand, if you're forced to check a guitar then loosening the strings does take tension off the top and make it more resistant to rough handling. (You'd also want to make sure the neck and headstock are well-padded in that case.)

deach
02-17-2009, 07:28 AM
...If anything, it would seem to me that having the strings detuned for the length of the flight is going to do more damage to the neck than any change in air pressure.

Why would detuning do damage to a neck? Every uke I've bought was sent to me detuned. I don't understand your statement.

NukeDOC
02-17-2009, 07:32 AM
Both the cabin and the cargo hold are pressurized (to 8,000 feet) and heated (although the cargo hold is usually slightly cooler than the cabin, depending on whether or not animals are being transported). If anyone can explain to me the physics that dictates how that kind of pressure change is going to have any effect on guitar strings I'd love to hear it. If anything, it would seem to me that having the strings detuned for the length of the flight is going to do more damage to the neck than any change in air pressure.

i personally didnt have a prob when i brought my ukulele home as carry on. but there was a thread here a while back about horror stories involving headstocks snapping off of the neck midflight on guitars checked in as luggage because they "didnt loosen the strings first". honestly, i dont know how far to take that, but i would rather err on the side of safety. but now you open up a new outlook on it... so which is it? which is safer? who has the answer? this sucks.

allinfun
02-17-2009, 07:32 AM
Trick has about 13K in frequent flyer miles (Pono koa concert) in 2008 and Stud (Pono Tenor Mahogany) has 27K frequent flyer miles in 2008. Nary a problem one with travelling with them. They tuck into the overhead bins easily enough but more often than not the flight staff is really nice about asking if we want to tuck them up in the flight crew cabinets.

They even resulted in us making a friend of a flight crew member who invited us to her ranch near Kailua. All because she knew about ukes and we spent a 6 hr flight chatting over the uke world and the instruments.

upskydowncloud
02-17-2009, 07:32 AM
g'day guys, since i travel around alot for work and studying reasons, i always take my uke with me, the concert fits right in my back pack no worries, how would you go takeing a tenor uke, in a case on the plane with ya, i would have it stashed in my backpack again, but will proberly me sticking out a bit, would they kick up shit?? also whats the best way to travel with it, put it in a case then wrap the case in bubble wrap????

I just got back from a round trip with my tenor uke (London to Boston and back) with no problems at all. I kept it in the case and brought it as carry on in addition to another bag I had and it wasn't an issue. I stored it in the first class cabin cupboard thing as you get on the plane and as I got off the stewardess had it out ready for me (and my uke).

The only concern I had was at security in Boston. The guy was very interested in my case and did various tests on it, then tested the tuner and asked what it was for, then asked about the humidifiers. He then took out my uke and was wandering about with it in his hand, I could have killed him!

I can't see the pressure of the cabin having any effect on the strings or the wood for that amount of time. Mine seems ok anyway.

NukeDOC
02-17-2009, 07:33 AM
Why would detuning do damage to a neck? Every uke I've bought was sent to me detuned. I don't understand your statement.

as far as an ukulele goes, its hard to say, but on a guitar with a truss rod that has been tensioned against the tight pull of steel strings, i can see where that might be a problem, unless you loosen the truss rod as well, and re-setup upon landing and settling in.

cpatch
02-17-2009, 07:38 AM
Why would detuning do damage to a neck? Every uke I've bought was sent to me detuned. I don't understand your statement.
I should have specified that it's a potential issue with guitars (for the reason NukeDOC mentions), not so much ukes.

Nuke-ulele
02-17-2009, 07:40 AM
Both the cabin and the cargo hold are pressurized (to 8,000 feet) and heated (although the cargo hold is usually slightly cooler than the cabin, depending on whether or not animals are being transported). If anyone can explain to me the physics that dictates how that kind of pressure change is going to have any effect on uke or guitar strings I'd love to hear it. If anything, it would seem to me that having the strings detuned for the length of the flight is going to do more damage to the neck than any change in air pressure. On the other hand, if you're forced to check a guitar then loosening the strings does take tension off the top and make it more resistant to rough handling. (You'd also want to make sure the neck and headstock are well-padded in that case.)

I am a former airline ground control agent for Delta. Only the forward cargo hold is heated in my experience. On MDs and Airbuses, anyway. I also worked Boeing 727s, which were the same. You can't always ask to have something in the forward cargo hold...although live animals always go there. However, the rest of the bags are carefully allotted to different bins for weight distribution, based on fuels and which seats will be occupied on the plane. Moral of the story is to NEVER have an airline check your ukulele. It will almost never be in a heated cargo bin, and will be treated roughly...even if the agents handle it gingerly (although there is no guarantee of that, especially if you check it at the gate rather than right at the plane valet-style)...it will still be jostled around with the other heavy bags. Agents are also often required to persuade bags to fit in a certain space. We called that process "tetrising" the bags.... not sure about the pressurization issue...I don't think that matters. I travel with the uke all; the time and never had a problem when taking it on board with me anyway. Rapid temp change seems like a bigger enemy!

dnewton2
02-17-2009, 07:43 AM
I seem to remember seeing Aldrine in a video from the Cali Tour. They were running late and he had to tune his uke on stage. I think he had mentioned something about detuning it for the flight. I don't know what the physics are or anything But I usually tune down a couple of steps when I fly.

cpatch
02-17-2009, 07:44 AM
i personally didnt have a prob when i brought my ukulele home as carry on. but there was a thread here a while back about horror stories involving headstocks snapping off of the neck midflight on guitars checked in as luggage because they "didnt loosen the strings first".
I'd be willing to bet that was a result of baggage mishandling and the neck and headstock not being properly padded rather than an issue with string tension. (Although string tension does have the potential to make a mishandling problem worse.)

Fred Miu
02-17-2009, 07:51 AM
I seem to remember seeing Aldrine in a video from the Cali Tour. They were running late and he had to tune his uke on stage. I think he had mentioned something about detuning it for the flight. I don't know what the physics are or anything But I usually tune down a couple of steps when I fly.

interesting. when i went to hawaii with my uke and came back, i never had to tune my uke at all, seemed that it stayed tuned.

would this soon cause damage to my uke? :anyone:

bbycrts
02-17-2009, 10:10 AM
I can't imagine it can cause any damage to your uke - an airplane cabin is pressurized to be equivalent to the pressure at a certain altitude. Since a ukulele is open to the air (no sealed parts that would prevent the environment inside from equalizing with the air in the cabin), the change in pressure would act equally on all parts of the uke - there would be no net change. Since the cabin is pressurized to maintain the health and comfort of the passengers, the uke should be similarly comfortable.

Here in Portland, Oregon the airport is just slightly above sea level. I've heard that the cabin on the plane is gradually pressurized to about 8,000 feet (which means the pressure in the cabin actually decreases as the plane goes up, until it is equivalent to the pressure at 8,000 and then is held there). There are plenty of places in the world where people are living above 8,000 feet...while the pressure change is faster in a plane than, say, in a car, I still can't believe it would be sufficient to cause any problems.

deach
02-17-2009, 10:14 AM
So if the oxygen masks come down due to lack of cabin pressure, do you place a mask on the uke before you place it on kids or other passengers needing assistance?

rayan
02-17-2009, 10:14 AM
For inter-island fights here in Hawaii, we usually don't slack our strings as the planes don't get too high up, but on longer flights to the mainland we always slack our strings. I've saw necks snap off due to change in cabin pressure. Probably won't happen to well made ukes but ever since I saw that happen the first time, I don't take any chances.

Luna
02-17-2009, 10:42 AM
Would a padded gig bag (I don't have a hard case) be enough to protect it, or would I need to pad it more?

gotrice415510
02-17-2009, 11:13 AM
Would a padded gig bag (I don't have a hard case) be enough to protect it, or would I need to pad it more?

if you are gonna travle with your uke at all, than i woulod suggest u invest in a $40 hard case. Especially if you take on the plane, so that when people are jamming bags into the overhead compartment... your uke wont get smashed.

upskydowncloud
02-17-2009, 11:43 AM
Why would detuning do damage to a neck? Every uke I've bought was sent to me detuned. I don't understand your statement.

Yeah I've heard that too, it's the same reason you should only take one string off your uke at a time off when you're re-stringining your uke. I think that's what he meant.

Ukulele JJ
02-17-2009, 12:44 PM
I've saw necks snap off due to change in cabin pressure. Probably won't happen to well made ukes but ever since I saw that happen the first time, I don't take any chances.

Did you actually see the snapping take place? Or did you see the uke post-snap? I'm just wondering if we can say for certain that pressure change was the cause of the snappage.

Because, scientifically, I just don't get it. As bbycrts pointed out, there's nothing on a normal uke that would create a pressure differential.

JJ

Fred Miu
02-17-2009, 12:45 PM
For inter-island fights here in Hawaii, we usually don't slack our strings as the planes don't get too high up, but on longer flights to the mainland we always slack our strings. I've saw necks snap off due to change in cabin pressure. Probably won't happen to well made ukes but ever since I saw that happen the first time, I don't take any chances.

i guess im slacking my strings from now on. MAHALOZZZZZZ Rayan:shaka:

keithy351
02-17-2009, 03:28 PM
thank everyone for you responses and discussion, i will be making sure i got a hard case and stuff cause i will have a more expensive $600 uke rather then by shitty greg bennett uke, i gave my banjo to them to check in a year ago, and made sure it was covered in bubble wrap, the case came back with a dint in it (dont ask me how) so they would never be touching my uke, good to know it will be no worries, and maybe i can woooo a hot ass stuetess with my sweet sounding uke playing for some inflight hands on action :rolleyes:

grappler
02-17-2009, 03:49 PM
thank everyone for you responses and discussion, i will be making sure i got a hard case and stuff cause i will have a more expensive $600 uke rather then by shitty greg bennett uke, i gave my banjo to them to check in a year ago, and made sure it was covered in bubble wrap, the case came back with a dint in it (dont ask me how) so they would never be touching my uke, good to know it will be no worries, and maybe i can woooo a hot ass stuetess with my sweet sounding uke playing for some inflight hands on action :rolleyes:

LOL funny guy :eek:

PickNStrum
02-17-2009, 04:15 PM
I always use a case with my ukuleles everywhere I go and recomend this much more than a backpack. On a plane I always wait until everyone puts there bags in the overhead and then put my uke on top of it all so it dosen't get crushed. As far as loosening the strings, I really don't think it's necessary. I've never done it and have never had a problem. Ukuleles don't have as much tension as guitars

Luna
02-17-2009, 04:16 PM
if you are gonna travle with your uke at all, than i woulod suggest u invest in a $40 hard case. Especially if you take on the plane, so that when people are jamming bags into the overhead compartment... your uke wont get smashed.

I'll do that if I fly with it. Thanks. :)

FANaddic(t)
02-18-2009, 04:55 AM
You're allowed one carry-on bag and one personal item...the uke in its case qualifies as a personal item (as long as it fits in the overhead bin) so you can just carry it separately.

I travel with my uke quite a bit and when I do I always carry this (http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/assistant/editorial_1235.shtm). It's from TSA's website and apparently you can have one carry-on, one personal, and one instrument. Your airline carrier might have specific requirements for size though.

russ_buss
02-18-2009, 05:58 AM
I always use a case with my ukuleles everywhere I go and recomend this much more than a backpack. On a plane I always wait until everyone puts there bags in the overhead and then put my uke on top of it all so it dosen't get crushed. As far as loosening the strings, I really don't think it's necessary. I've never done it and have never had a problem. Ukuleles don't have as much tension as guitars

true and true. i would do this too but make sure you eagle-eye that compartment all the way until take-off. so many times, a flight attendant or last minute passenger will come by to rearrange and cram things into any space they can find. you need to be close by to yell "HEY!".



I travel with my uke quite a bit and when I do I always carry this (http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/assistant/editorial_1235.shtm). It's from TSA's website and apparently you can have one carry-on, one personal, and one instrument. Your airline carrier might have specific requirements for size though.

thanks, that document is a great find!

Uke-lahoma
02-18-2009, 06:42 AM
I travel with my uke quite a bit and when I do I always carry this (http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/assistant/editorial_1235.shtm). It's from TSA's website and apparently you can have one carry-on, one personal, and one instrument. Your airline carrier might have specific requirements for size though.

Yes, thanks for the document link! I've printed a copy and have tucked it in the pouch on my uke case.

khrome
02-18-2009, 08:44 AM
I travel with my uke quite a bit and when I do I always carry this (http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/assistant/editorial_1235.shtm). It's from TSA's website and apparently you can have one carry-on, one personal, and one instrument. Your airline carrier might have specific requirements for size though.

Ooh definitely good to know! Thanks! My work was suppose to send me to training next month and I wasn't planning on bringing my uke, even tho I wanted to, because I already had a laptop and purse to carry-on. Now I can bring it! I wish those travel Kala's were coming out before then tho...

On the subject of loosening strings, I did some research last night, but for guitars. Apparently, it doesn't have to do with the pressure - it has to do with low humidity. They keep it very dry in the planes (did you ever notice how dry your nostrils are when you fly?) So the wood loses moisture and becomes more brittle, and if you already have a hairline crack in the neck the tension from the strings plus the dryness of the wood can cause it to snap. Also, tension from the strings plus jostling around can cause it to snap as well. They suggest if your guitar (or in this case, uke) doesn't fit the case exactly - like it can still move around inside, to pad it around the neck.

This is my own opinion - if the plane leaves from a humid environment, and has a short distance to travel, the plane humidity may not drop as low. Maybe that's why some people do not have problems if they don't loosen their strings. But I'm not going to risk it.

haole
02-18-2009, 09:27 AM
I've carried my Kamaka on all sorts of plane rides, in a cheap padded gig bag. Usually I can get away with putting it next to me if I have a window seat and nobody notices. ;) Otherwise, I wrap a few t-shirts around it inside the gig bag for extra padding and put it in the overhead next to other soft things. Never had a problem even with the strings at full tension, but I loosen them anyway now just in case. Planes do tend to be disgustingly dry, so in the future I'll bring a little humidifier.

UkuleleHill
02-18-2009, 09:43 AM
That is a great thing to know! Great find FANaddic(t)!

geoffsuke
02-18-2009, 11:43 AM
Both the cabin and the cargo hold are pressurized (to 8,000 feet) and heated (although the cargo hold is usually slightly cooler than the cabin, depending on whether or not animals are being transported). If anyone can explain to me the physics that dictates how that kind of pressure change is going to have any effect on uke or guitar strings I'd love to hear it. If anything, it would seem to me that having the strings detuned for the length of the flight is going to do more damage to the neck than any change in air pressure. On the other hand, if you're forced to check a guitar then loosening the strings does take tension off the top and make it more resistant to rough handling. (You'd also want to make sure the neck and headstock are well-padded in that case.)

i was just thinking, and it probably isn't true. but if your case made an airtight seal around the rim. and the cargo hold you had it in wasn't pressurised (which it would be) then i guess your case and uke would explode.


and by the way, does any one know the rules for the uk handluggage??? as they became a lot stricter after the liquid bombs and such

peace:cheers: and beer

khrome
02-18-2009, 12:21 PM
and by the way, does any one know the rules for the uk handluggage??? as they became a lot stricter after the liquid bombs and such



Looks like UK airport security is handled by the Department of Transportation
http://www.dft.gov.uk/transportforyou/airtravel/airportsecurity/

The rules are constantly changing so you should always check that page before you travel, and also ask your airlines.

buddhuu
02-18-2009, 10:28 PM
Only time I fly is between UK and Ireland. Ryanair is a budget airline, so baggage allowances are minimal and you get screwed for all extras and excess.

As one of the main reasons for my trips is to join in pub sessions, I take my mandolin. No way is it going in the hold, so I have to buy a seat for it. If I was taking a nice tenor uke, I'd do the same thing - sit it next to me. Better safe than sorry.

meletui
02-19-2009, 01:42 AM
whoa...thats hard core

kailua
02-19-2009, 05:15 AM
As a retired airline pilot, I will plead with you NOT to check your ukulele in as baggage. We used to joke that all customers bags get smashed equally. Temperature changes make things expand or contract. The cabin temperature should not cause any damage to your uke. Cabin pressure changes are not a concern either as they are relatively minor. The cabin air is very dry so be sure to have a humidifier in your case. If the oxygen masks drop (due to rapid decompression) the last thing on your mind wiil be your ukulele!! If you want to detune your uke for this eventuality go ahead because it will get very cold very rapidly.

cpatch
02-19-2009, 05:46 AM
If you want to detune your uke for this eventuality go ahead because it will get very cold very rapidly.
And make sure the case is fireproof and can float.

khrome
02-19-2009, 07:27 AM
And make sure the case is fireproof and can float.

lol They should make flight cases. Pull a cord and the walls pop open to inflate a flotation device. Then you HAVE to save the uke to save yourself. Yeeeeaahh...

meletui
02-20-2009, 12:38 AM
I no longer have concerns about taking my ukulele on a plane....I am however crapping myself at the thought of having to go on a plane full stop (especially after reading kailua's message)....thankyou people...thanks alot!!!

dominicfoundthemooon
02-20-2009, 04:53 AM
i had my ukulele on the plane.. no worries.. i even have a photo.. i was sitting in first class.. no one was around me.. so i even played it a little!! 35000 feet in the air..

and i was on my way to hawaii!!

they need to make a movie.. UKES on a PLANE!! humm idea for a video.. maybe some one can suggest a contest for people to take photos or little videos of themselves playing ukes on a plane.. and have Samuel Jackson star in the finsihed video!!

d

keithy351
02-20-2009, 05:53 AM
.. and have Samuel Jackson star in the finsihed video!!

d

and have him come out from the curtins saying " IM SICK OF THESE MOTHER F#@KING UKES ON THIS MOTHER F#@KING PLANE" then moon walk back into the curtins

dominicfoundthemooon
02-20-2009, 06:11 AM
and have him come out from the curtins saying " IM SICK OF THESE MOTHER F#@KING UKES ON THIS MOTHER F#@KING PLANE" then moon walk back into the curtins

YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!: shaka:

B!rch
02-20-2009, 06:24 AM
Haha well I hope my concert can fit with me on my trip next week to New York City, I'll miss her if i can't bring her. :s

dominicfoundthemooon
02-20-2009, 06:53 AM
here are my motherf&%^%*ing ukes on the motherf&%^%*ing plane!!:shaka:

meletui
02-20-2009, 12:50 PM
Haha well I hope my concert can fit with me on my trip next week to New York City, I'll miss her if i can't bring her. :s
well i wont be taking my uke on the plane when i fly to tonga soon...nothing to do with the plane....just because everything you take to tonga....stays in tonga!!!

UkePanda
02-26-2009, 12:18 PM
Well i brought my baritone Uke with me to new york during the winter. and it was fine as a carry on. i was more concerned about it being too cold so that the strings freeze and break. xD

geoffsuke
02-26-2009, 12:26 PM
has anyone flying from the uk been able to take their uke on with them???

flipsurf66
02-27-2009, 02:47 AM
Most airlines allow a musical instrument as additional carry on. I fly from the Uk to Asia on business reguarly and allways take a concert uke in a padded gig bag. It goes in the overhead bin no problem, but the crew will take anything bigger (like a guitar) and store it for you (if you give them a nice smile and remember to say thanks). Never had any problems with cabin pressure.

deach
02-27-2009, 03:10 AM
here are my motherf&%^%*ing ukes on the motherf&%^%*ing plane!!:shaka:

Wow. I haven't seen ashtrays on a plane in a while. What airline was that?

casetone2514
02-27-2009, 04:26 AM
has anyone flying from the uk been able to take their uke on with them???
When security ask you what is in the case and you reply "it's a ukulele" they seem to hear, "I am harmless and cuddly as a fluffy bunny". Strange but true. I have had problems with all sorts of carry-on baggage, but never with my uke. Admittedly, I have never been on a long-haul with my uke and it is a concert size, not a tenor, but people are generally very sympathetic towads ukeists. A friend of mine had a case of 12 harmonicas (smaller than a laptop case) refused on a flight. He had to go back to check-in and put them in the hold. OK, a harmonica IS an offensive instrument, but inoffensive as a weapon.

Tony

hoosierhiver
02-27-2009, 04:27 AM
One of my origainal ukes has been around the world several times,three trips to asia as well as several flights around the states.I've never had any problems taking it as carry on.

Dibblet
02-27-2009, 04:28 AM
has anyone flying from the uk been able to take their uke on with them???

Yes, I recently took a uke to Australia and back via Hawaii and the US mainland with no problems. I actually had 2 ukes from Hawaii onwards. :D

There's a sign at Leeds Bradford airport that says something like "you are only allowed 1 bag with some exceptions like musical instruments"

katerdee
02-27-2009, 06:59 AM
I haven't flown in a couple of years, but if I remember correctly there's also a regulation that airline companies have to allow you to carry on your instrument. I've taken my bassoon on the airplane a couple times, and obviously the case is bigger than a ukulele! Never heard a fuss about it from anyone, I just put it in the overhead compartment.