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View Full Version : How playing an instrument benefits your brain - TED talk



GinnyT11
07-24-2014, 03:22 AM
This abbreviated TED talk shows how music, and especially learning how to play an instrument, activates and energizes our brain. The cognitive tasks used are then applied to other brain functions.

I like the mention that "learning to play an instrument is like having a full-body workout for the brain."



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0JKCYZ8hng

Osprey
07-24-2014, 03:47 AM
Very good information. Thanks for posting. I was sure learning to play the ukulele is good for you now here is some supporting arguments
Cliff

kvehe
07-24-2014, 03:57 AM
Thanks for posting this, Ginny. I saw it last night, and if I hadn't been in the middle of such work turmoil, would have posted it myself. I'm glad you did.

graybones
07-24-2014, 08:07 AM
Very interesting! Thanks for posting.

dirtiestkidever
07-24-2014, 09:12 AM
Yeah. Wasn't someone asking recently how to stay motivated? Watching this should help. Thanks.

GinnyT11
07-24-2014, 11:10 AM
This is tremendous motivation to me. Not only does it make me proud that I can play an instrument, but it seems to be an excellent way to keep an aging brain sharp. (Yes, I can play, but where did I leave my ukulele?)

kvehe
07-24-2014, 11:15 AM
So true! It resonated especially with me since last week I (finally) started private uke lessons. (Of course, my instructor is trying to convert me to the guitar, but that's another story. "The ukulele is like a little car. Big cars are available". Not exactly a direct quote, but close enough.)

PereBourik
07-24-2014, 03:22 PM
Then why is it I still can't remember why I walked into the room?

DaveY
07-25-2014, 01:37 AM
(Of course, my instructor is trying to convert me to the guitar, but that's another story. "The ukulele is like a little car. Big cars are available". Not exactly a direct quote, but close enough.)
I would say to that instructor "You have a little mind. There are instructors with big minds available, and I'm going to work with one of them instead of you." OK, back to the thread topic . . .

Andy Chen
07-25-2014, 02:06 AM
Does this apply only to those who read scores and play at the same time?

GinnyT11
07-25-2014, 02:22 AM
That would be hard to know exactly, Andy.
I think the educator's message is that using so many senses and brain functions—eyes on music, hands moving and playing, possibly voice singing, ear evaluating, and other brain functions checking rhythm, and perhaps coordinating with others—that many brain areas are stimulated together. That keeps everything up there operating smoothly for when you need to use your brain for other multi-function activities.

caukulele
07-25-2014, 03:40 AM
Wonderful Jenny. Thanks for sharing. Very interesting...and all the more reason to keep on playing!