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View Full Version : Tuner says the A string is right, but it sounds flat and feels loose. Thoughts?



rczrider
07-31-2014, 12:37 PM
First, I apologize if this has been covered. I did a quick search and didn't see a thread that matched, so I made my own.

I picked up the Mahalo U-30 and per the suggestions in the other thread (about using Aquilas), I decided to just use the stock strings until I've had some time to learn how to play.

The problem is that I think my tuner's wrong. I have the ChromaCast CC-440 and set it to "U" (in the key of C). It seems to be fine with GCE, but when I loosen the A string until it shows up as correct, it's very loose and sounds very flat.

Since I'm new to music in general and ukuleles in particular, I'm sure whether to trust my ear or the tuner. Using this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqTPbZf44E0) or the videos on this page (http://www.canaryuk.com/URC/tuning.html), I'm inclined to trust my ear and assume the tuner is waaaaaay off. Shouldn't the A string sound close to the G? I realize playing the sounds through computer speakers isn't the best bet, but I figure it's close enough.

I realize I'm noobing all over myself here...I'm just trying to figure out if it's most likely the tuner or my uke that's wonky.

Thanks!

Kanaka916
07-31-2014, 12:47 PM
You may have to go up an octave. Press on the 5th fret of your E string and that will be your A.

Rllink
07-31-2014, 12:48 PM
First, I apologize if this has been covered. I did a quick search and didn't see a thread that matched, so I made my own.

I picked up the Mahalo U-30 and per the suggestions in the other thread (about using Aquilas), I decided to just use the stock strings until I've had some time to learn how to play.

The problem is that I think my tuner's wrong. I have the ChromaCast CC-440 and set it to "U" (in the key of C). It seems to be fine with GCE, but when I loosen the A string until it shows up as correct, it's very loose and sounds very flat.

Since I'm new to music in general and ukuleles in particular, I'm sure whether to trust my ear or the tuner. Using this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqTPbZf44E0) or the videos on this page (http://www.canaryuk.com/URC/tuning.html), I'm inclined to trust my ear and assume the tuner is waaaaaay off. Shouldn't the A string sound close to the G? I realize playing the sounds through computer speakers isn't the best bet, but I figure it's close enough.

I realize I'm noobing all over myself here...I'm just trying to figure out if it's most likely the tuner or my uke that's wonky.

Thanks! The search does not always find what you are looking for, even if it is there. When I first got my uke, I was having a similar problem with the G string. Finally I realized that the string was an octave low. I cranked it up an octave, and life is good. Check it out.

Rllink
07-31-2014, 12:49 PM
You may have to go up an octave. Press on the 5th fret of your E string and that will be your A.You beat me to it by a minute.:-)

rczrider
07-31-2014, 04:26 PM
Thank you all very much! I was wondering if it "looped" around (from G to A) on the tuner, which I now realize is the change in octave :P

I was afraid to tighten it too much, though, at least without you guys telling me I could. All seems good. Thank you again for your help and patience with the noob questions!

bunnyf
07-31-2014, 05:51 PM
Not a silly question. I think many noobs, including me, were uncertain in the beginning. Without any string instrument experience, I wasn't really sure what octave I was aiming for and had no idea about string tension. I seem to recall breaking at least one string by tuning up an octave too high.

Nickie
08-01-2014, 12:09 PM
Really....the only way I could be sure mine was tuned right, at first, was by tuning it to the piano....otherwise, I couldnt be sure!

UncleMoon
08-01-2014, 02:56 PM
Really....the only way I could be sure mine was tuned right, at first, was by tuning it to the piano....otherwise, I couldnt be sure!

you can do that??!

Shorebird
08-02-2014, 02:35 AM
Kanaka916 got it right

exoticices
08-02-2014, 06:07 AM
Yes, I was surprised how taut you have to make the strings when I first tuned my uke. I was convinced they would snap!

jecxjo
08-06-2014, 02:14 PM
UncleMoon all instruments produce notes based on frequency. They may be played differently (a note on a guitar is in a different location than on a uke) but middle C on a piano is at 261.6Hz just like the C on standard uke tuning. All the letters of notes and their octives are just set frequencies, nomatter what instrument you play. This is why you can play a note on one instrument and play the same note or an octive of it and you can hear they are the same or related.