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exoticices
08-01-2014, 03:53 AM
When I first started playing, I blindly followed what I read on the internet. So for D7 I tried to play 2223 (2nd fret on string 4 - G or top string, 2nd fret on string 3 -C, etc.). Then I found somewhere that said I could alternatively play 2020 for a D7, which was great, it was easier! But I didn't understand why you could play D7 in two different ways - different notes.

This is a little article on my uke blog on how a little knowledge of music theory can help you experiment with your playing.

http://ukeagogo.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/voice.html

Most of my blog is typical self-indulgent blognonsense but I hope some beginner players may find some bits of it useful.

Kanaka916
08-01-2014, 04:08 AM
That topic has been discussed quite often here and chances are you aren't the last. My take on it, if it sounds good - use it.

ohmless
08-01-2014, 06:26 AM
I use 2223 more often when songs have a preceding or following a C or a D. I use 2020 more often when it is near a Dm. They are both handy in different situations. Both are worth learning.

sukie
08-01-2014, 06:58 AM
That topic has been discussed quite often here and chances are you aren't the last. My take on it, if it sounds good - use it.

+1


Hi, Kanaka!

Icelander53
08-01-2014, 07:06 AM
A lot of cowboy songs use 2020 in place of D7. I use it when I can but often it doesn't sound quite right or it sounds weak compared to a D7 proper.

I'm not very good or very fast so I always look for the easiest way to play a song. I'll check out the blog. :shaka:

Manalishi
08-01-2014, 11:36 PM
I tend to use the 'full' D7 (2223) for rock and blues based songs
and I find the alternate D7 (2020) sounds better in old time and
music hall (vaudeville) type songs. I learned the 2020 version at
first from a site I used to visit!

kypfer
08-02-2014, 12:24 AM
The problem with the 2020 fingering for a D7 is that it doesn't actually have a D-note in the chord! It's not harmonically "wrong" but it probably should actually be called something else. On a six-string guitar 002020 is a valid A7 (five frets down fromthe ukulele's D7), but it has the advantage of the A note on the open 5th string. On the ukulele, for "musical correctness", one should probably use 2223 or 7685 for a D7 chord, but if 2020 sounds OK in context ... no problem :)

exoticices
08-02-2014, 06:04 AM
Thanks for the replies guys. The main point I was trying to make was that when I was a complete beginner I thought there was only one 'correct' way to play something musically. But of course there isn't! It's all about sound at the end of the day and a bit of understanding of what you're doing can help you do things differently.

Rllink
08-02-2014, 06:58 AM
Thanks for the replies guys. The main point I was trying to make was that when I was a complete beginner I thought there was only one 'correct' way to play something musically. But of course there isn't! It's all about sound at the end of the day and a bit of understanding of what you're doing can help you do things differently.I'm trying to learn how to play the ukulele, and I go through my lessons every day religiously. But I started playing in order that I might express myself and sometimes I sit down with my uke and just make weird noises with it. I make up chords, and more often than not, I discover later that I didn't make up anything, that it was already a chord all along. But for me, that time that I spend just making stuff up is as important to me as the time I spend practicing out of a book. Every chord, every strumming technique, every finger picking style was discovered by someone who jumped out of the box and made some weird noises. One should never fear being creative, and one should never let convention stand in their way.