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VegasGeorge
08-14-2014, 02:32 PM
Iím a retired guy who had a moderately successful working career. As Iíve often pointed out to my wife, most of my contemporaries who are in similar circumstances spend a lot of time on the golf course. Golf has never interested me. But, if it did, I would certainly play at least twice a week. I mean, I canít see having an avid interest like that without going out to do it at least every few days. So, out of curiosity, I checked on the rates for 18 holes of golf in my area. I was looking at the course where I live, and the closest public course to where I live. I see the rates fluctuate during the year, and range from $90.00 to $230.00 per round of golf. Just using rough figuring, it looks like I would be spending something in the neighborhood of $16,000.00 a year if I played golf and paid the standard green fees. Of course, there are memberships with discounts, etc. But I think itís fair to use the standard fees for the purpose of this estimate. So, as Iíve told my wife, that should be my ďGee itís great to be retired!Ē, play money allowance. Now, I canít actually see myself spending $16,000.00 a year on Ukuleles, but if I wanted to Ö. I think you can get my drift here. I suddenly have a much greater appreciation for the entire golfing industry. Keep up the good work, guys!

vanflynn
08-14-2014, 02:50 PM
How about $8000 on one uke? Think of the money you'll save!

PhilUSAFRet
08-14-2014, 02:57 PM
Sounds like good logic to me! I've said the same thing myself about "if I were a golfer." I can afford what I want, but my buying choices are somewhat ruled by "the law of diminishing returns."

Rllink
08-14-2014, 03:42 PM
Iím a retired guy who had a moderately successful working career. As Iíve often pointed out to my wife, most of my contemporaries who are in similar circumstances spend a lot of time on the golf course. Golf has never interested me. But, if it did, I would certainly play at least twice a week. I mean, I canít see having an avid interest like that without going out to do it at least every few days. So, out of curiosity, I checked on the rates for 18 holes of golf in my area. I was looking at the course where I live, and the closest public course to where I live. I see the rates fluctuate during the year, and range from $90.00 to $230.00 per round of golf. Just using rough figuring, it looks like I would be spending something in the neighborhood of $16,000.00 a year if I played golf and paid the standard green fees. Of course, there are memberships with discounts, etc. But I think itís fair to use the standard fees for the purpose of this estimate. So, as Iíve told my wife, that should be my ďGee itís great to be retired!Ē, play money allowance. Now, I canít actually see myself spending $16,000.00 a year on Ukuleles, but if I wanted to Ö. I think you can get my drift here. I suddenly have a much greater appreciation for the entire golfing industry. Keep up the good work, guys!Whatever works for you.

itsme
08-14-2014, 03:59 PM
Do you have to justify your acquisitions to your wife?

My husband was pretty supportive of my uke habit. He liked his toys, too. :)

kwall
08-14-2014, 04:21 PM
ukuleles are cheaper than a lot of things that people do or have hobbies so the more ukuleles the better :)

sukie
08-14-2014, 04:25 PM
Unpopular thought here maybe, but....if people spent as much time playing/practicing as they do shopping, they'd be really good players.

Although I do understand for some people it's not about playing ukulele, it's about buying them.

VegasGeorge
08-14-2014, 04:35 PM
Do you have to justify your acquisitions to your wife?

Actually, no. My wife is very supportive, and has repeatedly stated that "You worked hard, so you should get whatever you want." She did make me take back the Filipina Aerobics Instructor, though.

Andy Chen
08-14-2014, 04:39 PM
Forget the aerobics instructor. Get this: http://www.theukulelesite.com/koolau-hand-carved-archtop-tenor-2.html

It's cheaper and more than desirable...

VegasGeorge
08-14-2014, 04:52 PM
Forget the aerobics instructor. Get this: http://www.theukulelesite.com/koolau-hand-carved-archtop-tenor-2.html

It's cheaper and more than desirable...

Oh, but you haven't seen the aerobics instructor! Seriously, that Koola is very lovely. I especially like the back. But I'm just not a fan of sunburst finishes.

Andy Chen
08-14-2014, 04:58 PM
Pictures of the aerobics hottie, please! :D

igorthebarbarian
08-14-2014, 05:03 PM
Genius. Makes sense to me. In Vegas you could squander that away easily

RAB11
08-14-2014, 11:14 PM
I've normally found that when I need to rationalise a purchase, and end up making said purchase, I normally regret it.

Only time that hasn't been true has been with both of my ukes. :D

thenewb
08-15-2014, 12:14 AM
Well...comparatively speaking, UAS is not as bad as aquiring other instruments. MAS (Mandolin) and GAS (guitar) really puts a hole in your pocket. A mid-tier mandolin made in China cost upwards to $1K. Besides, you can sell or trade your ukes and recoup some of that money. Definitely cheaper than golf or gambling!

DownUpDave
08-15-2014, 12:15 AM
I am an avid golfer and most years I played three times a week. It can be a very expensive hobbie but so can bass fishing, being a car guy, shotgun shooting etc. I get the point that you are trying to make " ukulele is not nearly as expensive a hobby as a lot of others". I have had to cut back a lot on my golf this year just because of a busy work schedule, more money to buy ukes.:-)I have been averaging one a month and still not spending as much as I did on golf. I have a long neck soprano in transit at the moment and two customs on order. Life is short but can be very wide, if you don't die happy it is all your fault

Ukejenny
08-15-2014, 03:38 AM
$16,000.00 a year is just enough to cover purchases, maintenance, and all the traveling to uke festivals and shops and lessons.... Seems completely reasonable to me.

Rllink
08-15-2014, 03:45 AM
Unpopular thought here maybe, but....if people spent as much time playing/practicing as they do shopping, they'd be really good players.

Although I do understand for some people it's not about playing ukulele, it's about buying them.Haha, I sometimes wish there was a "like" button to click on.

Rllink
08-15-2014, 03:50 AM
Well, if that is what it takes to justify buying ukes, but I play golf as well as playing ukes, and I've never paid more than $15 for a round of golf. Of course, I hit the courses run by Parks and Rec twice a week, and that's only $8 for nine. But regardless, it costs money to play golf too.

VegasGeorge
08-15-2014, 04:07 AM
Well, if that is what it takes to justify buying ukes, but I play golf as well as playing ukes, and I've never paid more than $15 for a round of golf. Of course, I hit the courses run by Parks and Rec twice a week, and that's only $8 for nine. But regardless, it costs money to play golf too.

Yes, I know about golfing on the cheap, so to speak. And, there's definitely nothing wrong with that. But I live in a golf course community, so I started with our own golf course. Then I checked the rates at Bear's Best, the next closest course to my home. That's where I came up with my estimate. It's admittedly high end golfing. But then again, I'm only interested in high end Ukuleles, so it all sort of balances out. I think. :D Actually my taste in Ukes runs more toward variety than it does toward exclusive custom builds. I love my Kamakas, but I'm really enjoying my metal body National, wood body Gretch resonator, and Lanakai Banjolele. And, I have one of those Mid-East Baroq-uleles on its way. Now, if I can just recapture some of my playing skills I'll be a happy camper!

tbeltrans
08-15-2014, 05:10 AM
Unpopular thought here maybe, but....if people spent as much time playing/practicing as they do shopping, they'd be really good players.

Although I do understand for some people it's not about playing ukulele, it's about buying them.

This makes the most sense to me, though maybe this is one of those midwest fiscally conservative ethics, since I also live in the Twin Cities area. I clearly understand the excitement in getting something new and wanting to relive that many more times, but I would rather observe others doing that than doing it myself.

Regarding golf, the reason I never got into it (besides the fact that here in the Twin Cities, it would be a VERY SHORT season) is that it seems to cost money every time you want to participate. I am not naturally "skilled" in these sorts of things, so unless I do it every day consistently, I simply don't seem to improve. I find if I do a thing every day, I can become decent at it, so that isn't a problem. With a musical instrument, you can buy it once and then spend the rest of your life participating with very little added cost unless you want to take private lessons. That is very cost effective. Of course, for those who participate in UAS with consistency, that logic goes out the window fast. :)

Tony

Teek
08-15-2014, 05:11 PM
You can't sell your used rounds of golf on Craigslist when you decide you want to try a more expensive course.

UkerDanno
08-16-2014, 03:22 AM
I get your point, but...If you shop around you can play for $40-50 a round. I live in a golf community and play 2-3 times a week and that amounts to 60-70 rounds a year and spend $1000-$1500 on green fees. Equipment, balls, cart not included, of course the cart also serves as transportation. And there's also a new club around the corner, CAS is about as bad as UAS! :shaka:

Pundabaya
08-17-2014, 12:40 AM
Hey, ukuleles are cheap. You could be into horses. (I'm not thankfully, terrified of the things).

guitharsis
08-17-2014, 12:52 AM
Iím a retired guy who had a moderately successful working career. As Iíve often pointed out to my wife, most of my contemporaries who are in similar circumstances spend a lot of time on the golf course. Golf has never interested me. But, if it did, I would certainly play at least twice a week. I mean, I canít see having an avid interest like that without going out to do it at least every few days. So, out of curiosity, I checked on the rates for 18 holes of golf in my area. I was looking at the course where I live, and the closest public course to where I live. I see the rates fluctuate during the year, and range from $90.00 to $230.00 per round of golf. Just using rough figuring, it looks like I would be spending something in the neighborhood of $16,000.00 a year if I played golf and paid the standard green fees. Of course, there are memberships with discounts, etc. But I think itís fair to use the standard fees for the purpose of this estimate. So, as Iíve told my wife, that should be my ďGee itís great to be retired!Ē, play money allowance. Now, I canít actually see myself spending $16,000.00 a year on Ukuleles, but if I wanted to Ö. I think you can get my drift here. I suddenly have a much greater appreciation for the entire golfing industry. Keep up the good work, guys!

Good rationalization. Mine is that I limit myself to K brands. Love them. They sound and play awesome and, up to this point, have been easy enough to move when wanting to try something new and different.

Andy Chen
08-17-2014, 01:48 AM
Aw, let's not knock collectors so much. If we didn't keep buying them, luthiers have less incentive to keep making them and hence would not improve their skills as much with less practice.

Down Up Dick
08-17-2014, 05:12 AM
VegasGeorge, you didn't figure in the cost of clubs ($$$) and shoes ($$) and those loud clothes! And Golfers have GEAS too. And all that beer and brat sandwiches! :cheers:

ubulele
08-17-2014, 02:30 PM
Don't forget, you can play ukulele every day, rain or shine, whenever and for as long as you want, so that's gotta have some multiplier effect in the comparative cost equation.

Plus, no one gets impatient or "plays through". You can play the same "hole" over and over till you get it right, and your score is whatever you make it. You can play on any course, from your favorite armchair to a bench in the park to a mountaintop. You can get together with other people and all play at once. And only occasionally do you get upset and break an ukulele over your knee. You can resell a uke for not much less (and sometimes more) than you paid for it—try that with a golf club; no serious golfer wants your golf cooties. And ukes are decorative: if you start hanging your golf clubs on the wall, a padded room has got your name on it.

Green fees are but for hours, a bevy of ukes is for a lifetime.