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View Full Version : Where should I begin??? More to learn



jcricket
08-15-2014, 04:11 AM
Hello everybody,
Can I get some opinions. The more I learn about ukuleles, the more I learn I have more to learn. It is almost overwhelming. I have been hit really hard with UAS too. I have acquired five different ukes. Two electric sopranos, one concert, a tenor and a baritone. I have learned there are many ways to tune a uke. Also, many ways to play a uke. I have found two different versions of tab music for ode to joy. Also, there is strumming chords, readying music or playing tabs.

Where does one begin? I started with a hal leonard method first book. It was primarily working with chords. I like plucking. So I bought a different hal leonard book, one that is more towards plucking. I am now practicing plucking, and some chords. I am beginning to read music a little. I like tabs but feel that is a tool that will handicap you down the road.

To the question, is there generally a size of instrument and a method this is better for absolute beginners? I think this question is way to big to actually be answered. Maybe this will help. I love music that is more plucking than strumming, my personal preference.

If this is way to broad of a scope, please let me know how to narrow it, that alone would be helpful.
Thanks,
Mark

billten
08-15-2014, 04:32 AM
While this sounds simplistic... find a style of music you enjoy, get a few songs and start to play them. I think we over-complicate things too much and for me the uke is about having fun and playing lots. Learning resources i use everyday are:

Uke aerobics book
John king book
Uncle rob's Boot camp
All of William Welti's tabs

Enjoy...

PhilUSAFRet
08-15-2014, 04:41 AM
I advise my uke students to not buy any uke books until they know exactly which book they want/need and WHY!. There's too much free stuff here on UU and the rest of the net. Uncle Rod's Ukulele Boot Camp and..................the list of great tutorials are many and varied with tastes and styles. I like YouTube also. Just search, ukulele, how to...........and fill in the blank. The only book I now recommend for a "first" uke book is the relatively new Ukulele for Dummies just because it's a great entry level topical primer. Beyond that one, see my first sentence. Good luck and keep coming back. It's unlikely you can afford enough books to get the wisdom you can get here on UU.

jcricket
08-15-2014, 05:04 AM
I advise my uke students to not buy any uke books until they know exactly which book they want/need and WHY!. There's too much free stuff here on UU and the rest of the net. Uncle Rod's Ukulele Boot Camp and..................the list of great tutorials are many and varied with tastes and styles. I like YouTube also. Just search, ukulele, how to...........and fill in the blank. The only book I now recommend for a "first" uke book is the relatively new Ukulele for Dummies just because it's a great entry level topical primer. Beyond that one, see my first sentence. Good luck and keep coming back. It's unlikely you can afford enough books to get the wisdom you can get here on UU.

I did buy five books. They are all pretty much the same style. "Easy songs in tab for ukes" - more or less. I felt that if I could learn a few songs right off it would make me feel a bit more successful and hopefully keep me going. So far that has worked well.

So, if I understand correctly, just to keep at it, whatever it is, and you will learn what you need to as you need it. Makes sense to me.
Thanks!!
mark

mhendershott
08-15-2014, 05:30 AM
I found there are so many free uke tabs around the net that the song books seemed kind of redundant.
I spent my money on a UU+ account. So far it's been a great beginning for me. The videos are great for my learning style.
Aside from that I've just printed out a few songs I like for my own song book and I fiddle with them when I just want to play.

ericchico
08-15-2014, 06:00 AM
Welcome to UU! This place is amazing, great people from all over with tons of knowledge they dont mind sharing.

peanuts56
08-15-2014, 07:00 AM
Find a good teacher and take some lessons if you are serious. I played casually for years and decided to get a really good instrument. (Kamaka Tenor) I majored in music as a trumpeter. I thought it would be easy to teach myself to fingerpick. I was dead wrong. By chance I found myself in a Guitar Center and noticed they also taught a variety of instruments. I struck up a conversation with the manager of that dept. and asked if they taught ukulele. The guy who taught it was in the store that day and I've been studying for about a year. I've learned so much and my progress has been amazing. It's not an easy instrument to play really well. I manage to practice about 90 minutes a day while working full time teaching band, violin and classroom music at an arts magnet school. I'm no spring chicken at 58 and the process of learning can be frustrating at my age. However, I'm glad I took the opportunity to study privately. Good luck.

kypfer
08-15-2014, 11:02 AM
I like tabs but feel that is a tool that will handicap you down the road. ... I used to think along these lines, but I'll give you two reasons why I changed my mind.

1. An enormous amount of music arranged for the ukulele has been prepared in tabs, often ONLY in tabs.

2. It's actually very easy (with a bit of practice) to learn to sight-read tabs if they're well written. The advantage of (well-written) tabs, especially on the ukulele with it's re-entrant tuning, is not having to guess which string and fret is best to pluck to fit in with the previous and next notes in the tune. It's especially useful (I find) for when you need to pluck two or three strings at the same time, as opposed to strumming a whole chord.

Learning to read conventional "dots on lines" notation is also very useful, for those times when you can't find a tab for the tune you want to learn. For myself, I find both skills very useful and in no way do they detract from or interfere with each other.

YMMV obviously, but I wish you luck.

Remember, the term used is Playing Music ... it's not supposed to be hard work :)