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Down Up Dick
08-17-2014, 08:04 AM
What's a long neck soprano? (a tall, graceful gangster? Ha Ha?). No really, is it a soprano with a concert neck? If so, what's the point? Why not just buy a soprano or a concert. What am I missing?

Jim Hanks
08-17-2014, 08:15 AM
Yes, soprano with a concert, or sometimes even a tenor, neck. The point is to get the sound of a soprano with the fretting ease of a longer fretboard.

janeray1940
08-17-2014, 08:17 AM
Yep, soprano with a concert neck. Some of the reasons why I've heard include having either more frets, or a bit more room on the fretboard for bigger hands, while still retaining a soprano sound from the smaller body. There are also tenor-neck concert ukes for the same reason, and I think I've even heard of a baritone-neck tenor.

Jim Hanks
08-17-2014, 08:32 AM
I think I've even heard of a baritone-neck tenor.
Yup, Kamaka has one. I keep waiting for the baritone-neck soprano. :p

Down Up Dick
08-17-2014, 09:28 AM
Hmmm, well I hate to admit it, but my old ears don't hear that much difference between a soprano and a concert. My concert is louder than my soprano, but I don't hear much difference. Maybe somethin' they make for those stricken with massive UAS? I dunno . . . I 'll have to investigate further.

janeray1940
08-17-2014, 09:41 AM
Hmmm, well I hate to admit it, but my old ears don't hear that much difference between a soprano and a concert. My concert is louder than my soprano, but I don't hear much difference. Maybe somethin' they make for those stricken with massive UAS? I dunno . . . I 'll have to investigate further.

I tend to feel the same - my concert ukes are louder and the notes ring for a bit longer than on a soprano, but it's not a dramatic difference like for instance comparing a soprano ukulele to a baritone would be.

DownUpDave
08-17-2014, 09:47 AM
I guess it depends on the two instruments being compared but I have noticed quite a bit of difference in sound between a soprano and concert. I have one long neck soprano and another on the way, I like the extra finger room of the concert neck.

There is a youtube video from MyaMoe where Gordon and Aaron are talking about the sound difference between a regular soprano and a long neck soprano. They state there is a 23% increase in string tension because of the longer scale length and it does influence the sound, they both like it better.

Down Up Dick
08-17-2014, 09:48 AM
I just played both, and they're even about the same loudness. Well, all, thanks for the info. I'll have to spend my Uke money on somethin' else. :cheers:

Jim Hanks
08-17-2014, 09:49 AM
Maybe somethin' they make for those stricken with massive UAS? I dunno . . . I 'll have to investigate further.
You could be on to something there. I have one with two more on the way. The first is hence up for sale. I think you should start your investigation with a Kala SLNG. :p

DownUpDave
08-17-2014, 10:00 AM
I just played both, and they're even about the same loudness. Well, all, thanks for the info. I'll have to spend my Uke money on somethin' else. :cheers:

The only reason I went for a long neck was the extra fretting room. If you have a soprano you like then there really isn't any reason for a long neck. I am glad you are looking at other ukes, we must keep the economy rolling ;)

Jim Hanks
08-17-2014, 10:05 AM
. I am glad you are looking at other ukes, we must keep the economy rolling ;)
Hey, I just noticed OP doesn't have a 4 string tenor either. I have one of those for sale too. Just sayin' :)

PhilUSAFRet
08-17-2014, 10:17 AM
On the other hand, sometimes it is just a person's hearing. To me, the differences are obvious. The long neck soprano a fuller sound, just of a touch of the concert (you have to be able to hear the difference in the first place). As has been said, the same with the other sizes. Having recently been fully tested for hearing problems, I have become sensitive to the different kinds of "deafness." Some are tone related, some loudness related, etc. On the other hand, sometimes it takes a while for your ears to get used to hearing sonic subtleties. It sometimes also relates to how many ukes a person has heard, including their quality, tone woods, strings, etc. I can still remember the day I laid down my Pono concert and picked up and played a Kanilea. Wow, what a learning experience. Some people's hearing is so good that they can hear the differences in short order, others take time, certainly more than a few months. With some folks, it takes as long as it takes.

Down Up Dick
08-17-2014, 10:37 AM
Well, Phil, I'm old, and I was a radio operator for 10 years or so. It's a wonder I can hear any of my Ukes at all. And Jim, tenors are just a bit too big for me. Like Goldilocks, I find the concert juuuust right (she was only a so-so ukeist too).

Yknot
08-17-2014, 10:52 AM
For those of you who have both types of instruments, how does the long-neck soprano compare to the standard as far as sustain when you go up the neck? From my experience, most sopranos get kind of "plunky" as you play nearer the body. Sort of sustain, etc.

PhilUSAFRet
08-17-2014, 02:00 PM
Yeah Dick, I was a Morse Intercept Operator and have some tinnitus thrown into the mix. I also love a concert size. My hands aren't very big either. I'm guessing the better made the uke, the easier to hear the subtleties.

VegasGeorge
08-17-2014, 03:17 PM
For me the issue is room for big hands and fingers on the fretboard. I love my standard soprano, but its real tight for me. The concert size opens up the frets just enough to allow comfortable fingering. I played a tenor in lieu of my soprano for just that reason. Now I've discovered that the concert size gives me the soprano sound I love, and the room to play.

PereBourik
08-17-2014, 03:29 PM
For me it the appeal of a soprano long neck is the concert neck with "shangalang" of a soprano. I get the extra real-estate of the longer fretboard and a bit of extra sustain.

Yknot
08-17-2014, 03:51 PM
That sounds interesting! Perhaps the next soprano on the building plantera needs the concert-scale neck. I am in the process of doing that to a soprano banjo-uke t hat came to me with a bad neck. Hmmm

Down Up Dick
08-17-2014, 03:53 PM
Me too, Phil, on the MIO for a while, but I got away. I hear a constant hum or my pulse all the time. It gets on my nerves sometimes, and knowing my pulse rate all the time scares me at times.
My hands are pretty much medium; I have a heck of a time trying to play chords on the baritone--big stretch. But I mostly fingerpick it. I don't play it much as I'd rather sing and accompany myself with chords.

Hey George, you got a National Steel Uke? I think I read that somewhere. Wow! Is it loud? Do you play blues
on it? I'd like to have one, but not yet. I gotta play better to spend that much.

Down Up Dick
08-17-2014, 04:23 PM
All you Folks seem to be really honed in on the sounds of your Ukes. To whom do you play? Is your "sound" for your audience or for your own ear or do you just play?

French Horn players debate the merits of silver horns over brass, and some trumpet players swear by rotary valve trumpets. Yet no one in the audience ever hears the difference.

If you play wired or miked, doesn't that change the sounds of your Uke? So why be so nitty picky over minute differences in the Uke? I mostly play to sing, or whistle, or play my harps (not too much yet), and, if the chords are right and have no thunks, I'm happy. I'm not criticizing, just wondering how others think.

PereBourik
08-17-2014, 04:47 PM
All you Folks seem to be really honed in on the sounds of your Ukes. To whom do you play? Is your "sound" for your audience or for your own ear or do you just play?

French Horn players debate the merits of silver horns over brass, and some trumpet players swear by rotary valve trumpets. Yet no one in the audience ever hears the difference.

If you play wired or miked, doesn't that change the sounds of your Uke? So why be so nitty picky over minute differences in the Uke? I mostly play to sing, or whistle, or play my harps (not too much yet), and, if the chords are right and have no thunks, I'm happy. I'm not criticizing, just wondering how others think.

I play for me. 99% of the time I'm the only one listening. If someone else is listening I try to tune them out. The sound of a uke has to please me or I won't spend time playing it.

I posted my first Seasons video after two years of playing. It was interesting but that's not why I play.

VegasGeorge
08-17-2014, 04:50 PM
Gosh, if I waited to play better to buy a Uke, I wouldn't have one! :) The National is pretty loud at full strum. One nice thing about it is that it speaks clearly when strummed very gently. I just finished playing it this evening while sitting on the sofa watching TV with my wife. I can run through tunes so softly that she doesn't even notice, yet I can hear each chord change even with the TV blaring. I think it has something to do with the number of high overtones in the tone of the instrument. The sound reaches my ears, but doesn't fill the room.

Down Up Dick
08-17-2014, 04:59 PM
Wow! You're really lucky to have a National Steel. I'd like one (later) for blues with my harps. The banjolele's good for blues too. Well, I hope you appreciate your luckyness.

Down Up Dick
08-17-2014, 05:18 PM
Well, Pere, (doesn't that mean father?), I play all my instruments for my own amazement too. Sometimes, if I'm playing well, I have a really great time.

And back to the subject. Some of those writing on this thread have two or three long necks. If they don't sound exactly the same, I'm sure they'll be very similar. I wonder about all this. It seems very strange to me. Well, it takes all kinds . . .

southcoastukes
08-18-2014, 11:39 AM
We build longneck instruments almost exclusively, and there are indeed differences in sound between longneck and standard scales. But a lot of that has to do with how they can be strung.

So I can understand DUDicks perspective. First, because a longneck Soprano can be strung to sound very much like a Concert. But second, because of the assumption that seems to made so often here, and that is that everyone will use “Club Tuning” (tune to C).

While scales influence the stringing, which influences sound, if you’re going to tune everything the same, then the only other marked difference in sound between Soprano, Concert and Tenor is sustain and clarity up the neck. If those aren’t aspects that interest you much, then you might as well just pick the size that feels best. For DUDick, that’s the standard Concert.

But why is there so often this assumption for Club Tuning? Nobody would ask if you can hear a difference between a Violin and a Cello. You’d have to be completely deaf not to pick that one up. A Soprano will sound much better than the other two in D tuning – a Concert is superb in C tuning and a Tenor is wonderful in B flat. Standard or longneck, those three bodies can give you three very distinct voices, each with a range of notes naturally suited to its scale and acoustics properties.

Otherwise, as DUDick noted, the differences are somewhat more subtle and those subtleties just aren't that important to a lot of players.

TheCraftedCow
08-18-2014, 01:03 PM
There comes a point where the hearing degrades, and it doesn't matter which uke it is through ears which have need of assistance. Yes, I speak from experience---not just book larnin". The long neck soprano does sound soprano, and it also costs soprano rather than concert by about $100.00 . Both Leolani (laminated) and Lehua make very nice LNS units. The Lehua is matte finish with Aquila strings and strung through the body. They are made in Portugal;designed by Bob Gleason of Pegasus Guitars and Ukes, and sold through local dealers. (of which I am one, and have a new Lehua and Leolan for sale.

Down Up Dick
08-18-2014, 03:11 PM
Dirk, I couldn't agree with you more. I'm a brass man from the start, and I never heard of anyone (other than collectors) having 10 Bb flat trumpets, or a bunch of double French Horns. Having lots of Ukes makes sense if each one has a specific purpose. A couple of long necks in different keys is a grand idea. I plan to buy a pineapple concert one of these days, but I'll tune it to ADF#B. I also want a DGBE tenor Banjolele. Well, thanks for joining the thread, I enjoyed your comments.

Jim Hanks
08-18-2014, 03:43 PM
Having lots of Ukes makes sense if each one has a specific purpose....I plan to buy a pineapple concert one of these days, but I'll tune it to ADF#B. I also want a DGBE tenor Banjolele.
Agree - I plan on doing my KPK pineapple longneck in D tuning (low A) at the first string change although it is supposed to be coming in C (low G). I was going to put that tuning on my tenor banjolele but it won't take it without major alterations to the nut and tailpiece so I ended up doing it in dGBE (high d).

Down Up Dick
08-18-2014, 04:30 PM
Hi Jim, yeah, I want the high DGBE for my new Banjolele so I can play clawhammer and sound more like a banjo. If I were 50 years younger I'd take up the banjo (and the oboe). I really like those two instruments.

Someone really needs to straighten the low g/highG thing out. There's a thread about it, but I don't know if we settled anything.

I was thinking of tuning something to Bb to get into a bit lower key for my voice, but the chords are finger busters. Worse than regular Bb! I dunno. . .

Jim Hanks
08-18-2014, 05:00 PM
I was thinking of tuning something to Bb to get into a bit lower key for my voice, but the chords are finger busters. Worse than regular Bb! I dunno. . .
Tenor is great for Bb but you could do it for concert with the right strings. Not sure what you mean about finger busters - just play it like your C ukes, especially if you're trying to "auto transpose" for your voice.

Down Up Dick
08-18-2014, 05:22 PM
I mean the chords in the key of Bb (i.e. Bb-Eb-F7 etc). I like to stay away from the flat keys ( except F ).

Jim Hanks
08-18-2014, 05:30 PM
I mean the chords in the key of Bb (i.e. Bb-Eb-F7 etc). I like to stay away from the flat keys ( except F ).
Right, but that's all the more reason to tune the uke to Bb! Then to play in the key of Bb, your chord shapes are C-F-G7 etc. - exactly what you're used to.

Down Up Dick
08-18-2014, 05:40 PM
Hey! Yeah, of course, you're correct. I knew that too! I was befuddled. Thanks a lot. ;)

Did you see my last entry on the GCEA/gCEA thread? I think my answer clears up the problem, and I'm gonna use it from now on.

Jim Hanks
08-18-2014, 05:58 PM
Did you see my last entry on the GCEA/gCEA thread? I think my answer clears up the problem, and I'm gonna use it from now on.
I saw it. Maybe it'll catch on. As you can see in my signature I've gone with the capital-for-linear/lower-for-reentrant convention.

Down Up Dick
08-18-2014, 06:08 PM
It's too confusing because the g and G don't mean anything. It's too easy to mix 'em up. H and L actually stand for something. Well, we'll see. I'm usin' 'em.