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wayward
08-23-2014, 07:04 AM
I've just been searching old threads for solutions to feedback - when we have to squeeze ourselves into some small spaces (in hotel bars etc) the positioning of amps relative to ukes/mics/pa isn't ideal, but we can't really do anything about that, so I'm considering trying a feedback buster. I understand, from reading previous threads about this, that the soundhole cover can change the tone - I'm just wondering if that happens so much with these http://www.lutehole.com/index.php
Does anyone on here use them? Or another feedback buster they would recommend? (The lead uke player, having the most feedback problems is using a Kala Acacia Tenor btw, though he should be getting a Pono ATD with cutaway soon).

Brad Bordessa
08-23-2014, 07:23 AM
What kind of pickup do you have?

A notch filter is a great tool to expand your volume-before-feedback. They can be found on decent preamps plus a whole bunch of other goodies. The favorite around here is the LR Baggs Paracoustic DI.

wayward
08-23-2014, 07:26 AM
Thanks Hippie Guy. I'm using the Behringer AD 121 - but I'm not the one having the problems... I know our lead uke player uses some kind of guitar pedal... I'll find out tomorrow what it is and get back to you on that one.

ricdoug
08-23-2014, 09:10 AM
The notch filter on the Para Acoustic DI does a great job. You can download a spectrum analyzer for your smart phone (I use FrequenSee on Android) to narrow down the offending frequency. The tonal controls of an ADI21 can help you reduce feedback. The ADI21's sweep able parametric midrange can sometimes help lower the offending frequency, stuffing the 'ukulele with crumpled newspaper works too, but it changes the sound of the instrument. Ric

Kekani
08-23-2014, 11:14 AM
. . .LR Baggs Paracoustic DI.

+1

Got three of them, and an LRBaggs Venue DI. Of course, only 1 of the Paracoustics are in use - the other 3 DI's are still brand new, in the box.

Tony Gamble taught me about stuffing a rag in the body. Works well if you have a UST - he has a Baggs Element if I'm not mistaken.

wayward
08-24-2014, 07:36 AM
The unit our lead uke player is using is a Boss ME - 50. Obviously he likes to use effects occasionally (& is playing uke/electro-acoustic guitar/electric guitar/banjo - so we're asking quite a lot of our equipment). Interestingly, we were squeezed into a very small space today, and we had no feedback problems at all... :confused:

Kekani
08-24-2014, 08:34 AM
The unit our lead uke player is using is a Boss ME - 50. Obviously he likes to use effects occasionally (& is playing uke/electro-acoustic guitar/electric guitar/banjo - so we're asking quite a lot of our equipment). Interestingly, we were squeezed into a very small space today, and we had no feedback problems at all... :confused:

This is the type of situations that prevent you from addressing feedback because most people will think "cool, not going to happen again".

I just reread your first post and have a few comments.
-The position of amps have no bearing whatsoever on feedback. I'm getting into semantics, but this is important.
-Monitors are the usual source of feedback, and good monitors in the right position will give you high gain before feedback. Of course, good mics and dsp help as well.
-Mains can also cause feedback, if you put them behind the mics
-Effects can have an effect on feedback, especially if you mix with the monitors wet.
Note: if you don't run monitors, and have mains behind the mics, wet, I would say you are in a good position for feedback.

And last, but certainly not least: What is your current setup? What mixers, amps, speakers, monitors, eq etc? This information, in the first post, would've helped considerably. Admittedly, I didn't read into enough initially to realize there may be more going on than just a Kala.

wayward
08-24-2014, 09:43 AM
This is the type of situations that prevent you from addressing feedback because most people will think "cool, not going to happen again".

I just reread your first post and have a few comments.
-The position of amps have no bearing whatsoever on feedback. I'm getting into semantics, but this is important.
-Monitors are the usual source of feedback, and good monitors in the right position will give you high gain before feedback. Of course, good mics and dsp help as well.
-Mains can also cause feedback, if you put them behind the mics
-Effects can have an effect on feedback, especially if you mix with the monitors wet.
Note: if you don't run monitors, and have mains behind the mics, wet, I would say you are in a good position for feedback.

And last, but certainly not least: What is your current setup? What mixers, amps, speakers, monitors, eq etc? This information, in the first post, would've helped considerably. Admittedly, I didn't read into enough initially to realize there may be more going on than just a Kala.

Thank you, I've noted all that and will report back to our lead uke player. I can't answer all your questions (I simply don't know the answers without talking to the 2 fellas in the band, who are the experienced ones), but, if it helps you to advise further, I can tell you that we are not using monitors, our amps (2 Laneys and a Roland AC 33) are behind us, and, yes, the feedback is often worse with the use of effects, when it occurs. (We are using a PA btw, but only the Roland and the 3 mics go through that - speakers on stands on the floor in front of us).

The reason I initially asked about a Feedback Buster, and whether anyone has used them, was that although our lead player uses banjo & 2 guitars as well as the Kala, the feedback only occurs when he is playing the uke. Initially he was playing a Kala Mango, and the feedback was worse with that (it doesn't occur with the electro-acoustic guitar, for example); it's better with the Kala Acacia, but just occasionally it haunts us again. I think I'll go to our next gig armed with a rag (thanks for that tip), newspaper (which I discovered from reading an old thread) and a gravy granules tub top (which, according to another old thread, fits the soundhole of most Kalas), in case of dire emergency.

Kekani
08-24-2014, 10:00 AM
Thank you, I've noted all that and will report back to our lead uke player. I can't answer all your questions (I simply don't know the answers without talking to the 2 fellas in the band, who are the experienced ones), but, if it helps you to advise further, I can tell you that we are not using monitors, our amps (2 Laneys and a Roland AC 33) are behind us, and, yes, the feedback is often worse with the use of effects, when it occurs.

The reason I initially asked about a Feedback Buster, and whether anyone has used them, was that although our lead player uses banjo & 2 guitars as well as the Kala, the feedback only occurs when he is playing the uke. Initially he was playing a Kala Mango, and the feedback was worse with that (it doesn't occur with the electro-acoustic guitar, for example); it's better with the Kala Acacia, but just occasionally it haunts us again. I think I'll go to our next gig armed with a rag (thanks for that tip), newspaper (which I discovered from reading an old thread) and a gravy granules tub top (which, according to another old thread, fits the soundhole of most Kalas), in case of dire emergency.

No need to research more. I think I can tell you your issues with what you have - placement.

By the way, in the world of PA, the Roland is a powered cab or speaker, not an amp. Basically, you don't have a PA, so everything I stated is irrelevant to your setup. You're using music instrument cabs as mains, and placing them behind the mics.

Get those cabs in front of the mics, facing the audience, and your feedback is gone. BUT, now you can't hear yourself because, again, you don't have a PA. Get a one, even a simple one, with monitors, and your world will change.

In fact, you may be able to skip the monitors at first if you use the Roland and Laneys, facing you (instead of the audience) as monitors, and let the PA carry the house. Not the best solution. In fact, not even close by any means. BUT, compared to what you have, well, you know what I mean.

Here's my crystal ball for you, IF you keep performing. At one point, for monitors, you'll get some full range speakers and put them on their side, instead of getting true monitors. Don't worry, everyone does it (doesn't mean there's a not a better way). Or, you'll get a pa, and run the speakers behind the mics, but because you have a good eq, you'll be able to notch the feedback (which you can't do right now).

There's a reason why Yamaha makes a Passport (Fender has a similar one too). i wouldn't use it personally, but its a stepping stone.