#5 The Moveable B Formation and its Variations

  1. Hms
    Hms
    #5 The Moveable B Formation and its Variations
  2. KevinV
    KevinV
    I'm going to work the moveable formations out of order, and switch to the B formation. I was working on the D, but since I'm focusing on the notes on the 4th string, incorporating the B formation chords is a natural extension since the root is on the 4th string. When I feel confident with the 4th string and focus on note location on the 3rd string I'll work on the D formation, and the same with the 2nd string and the G formation. I think this will help me to gain better note recognition as I'll be putting it into use with chords as well as just working the individual notes up the string.

    I think this will really help me to build a solid foundation for when I move onto the G-D-B roadmap in chapter 6.
  3. dktoller
    dktoller
    Yes! D-formation always has root on the C-string. G-formation has root on E-string. And B-formation has root on G-string (and A-string).

    This has a big implication. If you want (for example) an D chord
    1. Find any D on the fretboard.
    2. Select the chord formation which uses that string as the root.

    (Edited: Removed example because it was completely wrong. Credit to KevinV for straightening it out below)

    Sounds like you are finding a good way forward.
  4. dktoller
    dktoller
    By the way I don't understand why he calls it a B-formation. He says

    "The B formation is so named because it's a moveable version of a second position B chord." (p. 22).

    Am I missing something? The B chord (4322) can't be played any lower, so this is a first position chord, right? If I follow how how he named the D and G formations, I would label chapter 5 as an "A-formation".

    At any rate, he calls it a B-formation so we should continue to use that.
  5. KevinV
    KevinV
    "The B formation is so named because it's a moveable version of a second position B chord." (p. 22).

    Am I missing something? The B chord (4322) can't be played any lower, so this is a first position chord, right? If I follow how how he named the D and G formations, I would label chapter 5 as an "A-formation".


    I believe it's because your index finger is at the second fret when making the chord.
  6. KevinV
    KevinV
    I.e., C-string fifth fret is a D. To have the root on the C-String, use the D-formation. This means 7655 is a D chord.

    The C-string 5th fret is an F. To have the root of a D chord on the C-string, the D formation would be 2220 (A D F# A). 7655 (D F# A D) would be a D chord with a G-string root using the B formation.
  7. KevinV
    KevinV
    This approach is working well. I'm only a few days into it and the notes up the neck on the G string are second nature now. I had initially intended on spending a week on each string but will extend that. I have the B formation major chord down pat up the neck and now that I know the 1 3 5 1 pattern of the B formation, I'm working out the other chords that are built off it (6, sus4, maj7, etc.). I know everyone learns in their own way, but this is certainly working for me.
  8. dktoller
    dktoller
    Thanks for finding/fixing the example. You must have a good handle on this now!
  9. KevinV
    KevinV
    No problem. I have a handle on it, but not as well as I'd like. I'm trying to memorize all the chord variations and although I've got several of them, there are plenty of others that elude me. Without songs to plug them into, I seem to easily forget them. I understand how to build them from the scale by modifying the notes of the original chord, but memorizing every one of them is coming slowly. I also need to work more on the fingerings. I can't grab some of them as quickly as I'd need to in a song situation. So, I'll be hanging out in this chapter for the foreseeable future.
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