Am I the only one that likes friction tuners best?

spongeuke

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Not only prefer friction tuners, but prefer wooden ones when set up right.
 

phil_doleman

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Friction pegs for me. No need for over-engineered geared pegs on a low tension instrument with nylon strings. I gig regularly and have never had an issue with them. Soprano ukes with heavy, metal, sealed gear tuners straight off a guitar? Yuk.

It's all well and good saying 'technology marches on', but you could say 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it'. People who are finding that friction pegs aren't allowing them to tune properly, or stay in tune, might well have awful, cheap friction pegs. I've had awful, cheap geared pegs that I could say the same about.

Most of the desirable, holy grail ukes, such as vintage Martins and Gibsons have friction pegs.

It's not just the geared pegs, but that combined with the tendency towards tenors (and I've even hear uke players talking about sopranos as if they're toys), high-tension strings, electronic gadgetry, etc. saddens me a little, as they seem to be turning gradually into small guitars, and losing the charm that the ukulele has.
 
H

Hippie Dribble

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Friction pegs for me. No need for over-engineered geared pegs on a low tension instrument with nylon strings. I gig regularly and have never had an issue with them. Soprano ukes with heavy, metal, sealed gear tuners straight off a guitar? Yuk.

It's all well and good saying 'technology marches on', but you could say 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it'. People who are finding that friction pegs aren't allowing them to tune properly, or stay in tune, might well have awful, cheap friction pegs. I've had awful, cheap geared pegs that I could say the same about.

Most of the desirable, holy grail ukes, such as vintage Martins and Gibsons have friction pegs.

It's not just the geared pegs, but that combined with the tendency towards tenors (and I've even hear uke players talking about sopranos as if they're toys), high-tension strings, electronic gadgetry, etc. saddens me a little, as they seem to be turning gradually into small guitars, and losing the charm that the ukulele has.

Hear! Hear!

truckload of likes.jpg
 

Mivo

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I speculate that the tenor trend is (in part) a result of the contemporary music of the past few decades or so. There's a lot of exposure to guitar-y, mellow sounds, and, for lack of a better term, "aural roundness". Exposure shapes preferences. But I may be way off with that theory. :)
 

spongeuke

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Friction pegs for me. No need for over-engineered geared pegs on a low tension instrument with nylon strings. I gig regularly and have never had an issue with them. Soprano ukes with heavy, metal, sealed gear tuners straight off a guitar? Yuk.

It's all well and good saying 'technology marches on', but you could say 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it'. People who are finding that friction pegs aren't allowing them to tune properly, or stay in tune, might well have awful, cheap friction pegs. I've had awful, cheap geared pegs that I could say the same about.

Most of the desirable, holy grail ukes, such as vintage Martins and Gibsons have friction pegs.

It's not just the geared pegs, but that combined with the tendency towards tenors (and I've even hear uke players talking about sopranos as if they're toys), high-tension strings, electronic gadgetry, etc. saddens me a little, as they seem to be turning gradually into small guitars, and losing the charm that the ukulele has.
It does seem that way, even travel tenors are showing up. Sometimes I'm the only reentrant tuned soprano in the group. I fear the ukulele is loosing it's happy voice to the little guitars.
 

strumsilly

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Friction pegs for me. No need for over-engineered geared pegs on a low tension instrument with nylon strings. I gig regularly and have never had an issue with them. Soprano ukes with heavy, metal, sealed gear tuners straight off a guitar? Yuk.

It's all well and good saying 'technology marches on', but you could say 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it'. People who are finding that friction pegs aren't allowing them to tune properly, or stay in tune, might well have awful, cheap friction pegs. I've had awful, cheap geared pegs that I could say the same about.

Most of the desirable, holy grail ukes, such as vintage Martins and Gibsons have friction pegs.

It's not just the geared pegs, but that combined with the tendency towards tenors (and I've even hear uke players talking about sopranos as if they're toys), high-tension strings, electronic gadgetry, etc. saddens me a little, as they seem to be turning gradually into small guitars, and losing the charm that the ukulele has.
And the vintage Martin tenor I had had the worst friction tuners I've ever used[it also had a pin bridge which I also dislike, though they look nice] . I tried everything to get those suckers to work, even got new fiber washers from Grover. Finally gave up and installed grover open geared tuners, which worked like a charm, werent heavy, and were not expensive.I am not opposed to friction tuners, but I've never had to adjust any geared ones and have had to fiddle with lots of friction ones. I did have a banjo uke with some wood pegs, and they were great. small sample though.
 

coolkayaker1

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No, Ashley Chantel, you are not the only one to like friction tuners. I do, too.

Since we're two peas in a pod, I sent you a UU friend request.
 

jimavery

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I much prefer friction tuners. They just look right, especially on Soprano ukuleles (my favourite too).

My tip (which I've mentioned before but bears repeating) for accurate tuning with friction tuners is when you re-string your ukulele, leave an inch or two tail at the peg rather than trimming the strings all the way back. This tail then acts as a visual indicator of how far you are turning the peg.