Arpeggio exercises for Baritone Ukulele

Edspyhill05

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I've been searching for arpeggio studies or exercises for Baritone ukulele. No luck. At this point i'm interested in beginner things like major arpeggios, minor, etc. Are there method books that have Baritone arpeggio studies? I'm thinking I may have to modifiy guitar arpeggio studies for the Baritone.

I've found a lot of G C E A arpeggio hits with my search results. So far the Baritone ukulele is getting no love.

If you have modified guitar, jazz guitar, classical guitar arpeggio studies, mention the source, please

Ed T.
 

Arcy

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I use GCEA targeted books and either follow the dots, which mostly don’t care what your tuning is, or let the tab transpose keys. The intervals are the same. So long as you aren’t trying to match another instrument it won’t matter much that you’re in another key.

The two caveats on following the dots is that you can get into trouble with the range of the instrument, and the same tune may be easy in C but harder in G or vice versa.
 

ripock

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I have never used or even seen anything formal and structured. I just make my own arpeggios. I'll just take a chord quality such as a minor 11, then figure out the notes, see where the notes fall on the fretboard, and then make an arpeggio pattern that starts on the G string for when I'm playing standard and a pattern that starts on the C string for those days I am hamstrung with a high g. With the baritone I only make the 4-string version since it is linear
 

Edspyhill05

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Diedra and ripock - Thank you.

Dierdra: I visited Jolly Roger and it looks like it's mostly songs.

ripock: I think I would learn a lot more if I made up some exercises myself and use the cycle ot 5ths, and harmonized key progressions. One exercise I found was Jim D'Ville's "Perpetual Fifths" exercise for the GCEA tuning. I will try to convert the exercise to Baritone ukulele.

At Least I'm avoiding the deep dive into rabbit holes.

Ed T.
 
Last edited:

ripock

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What are you using the arpeggios for? When I was a kid I played arpeggios because I was a good little nazi and did whatever I was told to do. It never really seemed to apply to anything I was doing. I suppose I assumed it was intended to improve my mastery or to make my hands more supple.

Nowadays I use arpeggios for transitions. When improvising, I will use an arpeggio to move from one side of the fretboard to the other. Or if I paint myself into a corner and I'm stuck in the high frets, I'll divebomb to the lower frets with an arpeggio.

So I was just wondering how others are using arpeggios
 

Edspyhill05

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What are you using the arpeggios for? When I was a kid I played arpeggios because I was a good little nazi and did whatever I was told to do. It never really seemed to apply to anything I was doing. I suppose I assumed it was intended to improve my mastery or to make my hands more supple.

Nowadays I use arpeggios for transitions. When improvising, I will use an arpeggio to move from one side of the fretboard to the other. Or if I paint myself into a corner and I'm stuck in the high frets, I'll divebomb to the lower frets with an arpeggio.

So I was just wondering how others are using arpeggios
Ripock,
I had to think through what I expected to accomplish with arpeggios studies. I want another way to explore how chords connect. We have scales, the circle of fifths, practicing inversions of all the chord forms, voice leading, etc. Sometimes I need to try out some exercise out to see what it will illuminate for me.

And I am also interested in how I learn, how my brain organizes learning.
 

ripock

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That's cool Ed. In case there's any ambiguity, I was not judging people. I was just curious. Curious because my arpeggio motivation has altered greatly. As I said, long ago I did arpeggios because I was told to, and it never seemed to connect with what I doing. Nowadays, my arpeggios are very focused. I either use them for a bar instead of the connected chord or I use them to move physically from one point on the fret board to another point. I realize the term is foreign and therefore kind of sexy. It feels good to say I am arpeggiating. It is kind of like if you play a little leitmotif, instead of saying I'm just playing a little riff that stands in the background, you say I am engaging in ostinato. It just sounds more adult. I understand that, but I was wondering if we had a more definite reason to be doing this practice. I appreciate the input.
 

Down Up Dick

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I like to play them because they are fun to play, and they sound like something one should practice.

I really can’t say that they’ve helped me to become an outstanding musician after all these years though.
 

clear

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but I was wondering if we had a more definite reason to be doing this practice. I appreciate the input.

Arpeggios come up a lot in music, so practicing them is like practicing the scales.
 

pluribus

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Diedra and ripock - Thank you.

Dierdra: I visited Jolly Roger and it looks like it's mostly songs.

ripock: I think I would learn a lot more if I made up some exercises myself and use the cycle ot 5ths, and harmonized key progressions. One exercise I found was Jim D'Ville's "Perpetual Fifths" exercise for the GCEA tuning. I will try to convert the exercise to Baritone ukulele.

At Least I'm avoiding the deep dive into rabbit holes.

Ed T.
Jolly Roger has also arpeggios exercises for baritone. Scroll down the page and you can see them and even ear them too.