Baritone Ukulele?

Wiggy

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The drone can then be part of the major key, or, it can be be a 7, sus4 or add9.

Here's some examples:

A
A/D/E9
F/G9/A

G
G/C/Ds
C/F9/G

F
F/Bb/Cs
Cs/F/G7

E
E/A/Bs
A/D9/E

D
G/C9/D
D/G/As

Yes, I do like to 'piddle' around :)

I just wish I could learn a proper banjo roll. My strums and arpeggios are getting boring. It's my own fault for not stickin'-to-it.

Disclaimer: I am not a music scholar. I cannot read music, per se. I only know what I like to hear.
 
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Down Up Dick

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Well, good luck with whatever you’re doin’. I finished my Irish banjo studies, and now I gotta work on my tremolos for Italian tunes.

Have fun.
 
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Down Up Dick

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I usta have a Gold Tone concert banjolele, but I traded in back to the store for a Tenor. However, the store also had a GT baritone ukulele! Boy, I wish I’da had my mind right then. I sure would like to have the baritone instead of my tenor now — ahhh, well . . .
 
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roger67

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Increasingly, I'm starting to think that the baritone ukulele is the most perfect of instruments. If you come from a guitar background, then learning it in standard DGBE tuning is not a problem. It's easy to turn into a low G uke by placing a capo on the 5th fret. Nylon strings = easy on the fingers, plus you get a cool classical guitar vibe. It's easy to change to alternate tunings. Its parlour size makes it great for travel. I just love it.

Here's a great blog for baritone players, though I'm sure it's already been posted here many times and likely features many posters on this forum: http://humblebaritonics.blogspot.com/
 

Down Up Dick

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Increasingly, I'm starting to think that the baritone ukulele is the most perfect of instruments. If you come from a guitar background, then learning it in standard DGBE tuning is not a problem. It's easy to turn into a low G uke by placing a capo on the 5th fret. Nylon strings = easy on the fingers, plus you get a cool classical guitar vibe. It's easy to change to alternate tunings. Its parlour size makes it great for travel. I just love it.

Here's a great blog for baritone players, though I'm sure it's already been posted here many times and likely features many posters on this forum: http://humblebaritonics.blogspot.com/

I couldn’t agree more. I really enjoy mine.
 
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phydaux

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My baritone uke arrived yesterday from Amazon, and today Baritone Ukulele From Scratch and Baritone Ukulele Aerobics arrived.

I've been practicing my CAGED chords. Man, my left hand has forgotten everything it ever knew about chords. Just was well. My right hand never managed to learn anything to begin with.
 

about2

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I’m in love with my Pono steel string baritone. The sustain is unreal and the tone is really nice. Previously I played a mahogany bari, but not sure I’ll ever go back to it. Only problem is the world of steel strings is new to me. One could spend a fortune trying to get just the right ones. Any suggestions out there are welcomed!
 

mds725

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I’m in love with my Pono steel string baritone. The sustain is unreal and the tone is really nice. Previously I played a mahogany bari, but not sure I’ll ever go back to it. Only problem is the world of steel strings is new to me. One could spend a fortune trying to get just the right ones. Any suggestions out there are welcomed!

Steel string baritones rock! I have a Compass Rose (Rick Turner) steel string baritone and I love how it sounds. I think he recommended D'Addario guitar strings (the middle four). YMMV. I got a spare set by going to Gryphon Stringed Instruments in Palo Alto, where they measured the guages on the strings the uke came with and put together a set.
 

Diedra

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I just reread some of this thread, and I still think a Baritone Uke is more tenor guitar than ukulele.
I very much agree. I call it a baby guitar as it seems to have a lot more in common with it than a uke.
Baritone is so underated yet such a delightful instrument to play. I've already converted three friends to it so far. 😅
 

Nickie

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I smiled when I saw this thread in the guitar forum, because I've always thought of the bari as more of a small tenor guitar than an ukulele. The re-entrant tuning sounds nice, too.
 

Nickie

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I started James Hill's course but didnt get far. I think it was in that course he said that the notes that stand out in a chord are

1. the highest note
2. The last note
3. the lowest note
4. the first note

Somewhat in that order (not sure about 3 and 4), so last note as a high note stands out the most but low note as the last note would work somewhat too, as you describe. Low note as the first note is going to be relatively indistinct from the rest of the chord.

He often plays only 2-3 strings of a chord so that the melody note is the last high note.
I started it too, and after a year, only got through book 3.