Best string brand for beginner???

stephenjm

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Hello,
I just started playing the ukulele I have a Kala tenor. Was wondering what is the
easiest, best sounding, brand of string for a beginner to play on?
Thank you,
Stephen
 

Ed1

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Hi stephenjm,

This is a subject that is almost continuous on this forum. You can search all kinds of info here to answer the question, and you will get as may opinions as you get posters.

IMO, a beginner needs a good setup to enjoy playing and practicing. After the setup, comes the type of string and the tension. If you're interested in tension, you can check out
Good luck
 

merlin666

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The strings that a new uke is equipped with are generally the best for that uke, especially for beginners. Once you have played so much that you wore out one of the original strings and it needs replacement, you also have developed enough awareness of your preferences to think about if you want to try different strings. As a beginner it is important to focus on playing and distractions like thinking about strings can be detrimental.
 

mikelz777

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Strings are one of those things where you can't really be sure about them until you've tried them. The strings that came on your Kala tenor are very likely to be Aquila strings. To me, Aquila strings sound kind of dull and muddy and I didn't like the feel of them. Through trials of other strings I found I didn't like nylon strings at all. I like the brighter sound and softer feel (lower tension? more flexible?) of a fluorocarbon string and would recommend Martin or Oasis strings as a safe bet.
 
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Cadia

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Strings are totally subjective. My first ukes were Kalas, and they had Aquila Nylgut strings. When I played guitar years ago I had been used to steel strings, but I didn't like the sound or, more importantly, the feel of the Aquilas on my ukes. I did some string research and switched to the fluorocarbons. For me, they have a softer, more comfortable feel, and the sound was more dimensional and full. I've tried Martins, Worths, Oasis, Living Water, Romero, KoAloha, and Uke Logics, and Ko'Olau Ahos, off the top of my head. Except for the Ahos, I like them all a lot better than the Aquila Nyguts. As a beginner, you might just want to stick with what you have, until it's time for a string change. That'll give you time to concentrate on gettting a consistent sound, and actually learn how different playing techniques can alter the sound your uke produces. If you want to change them, nothing wrong with that either.
 
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LukuleleStrings

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At this point it’s more about just playing, learning, and having a good time. You’ll develop tastes over time that will come naturally. Not a big deal right now. :)
 

Brad Bordessa

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The strings that a new uke is equipped with are generally the best for that uke, especially for beginners. Once you have played so much that you wore out one of the original strings and it needs replacement, you also have developed enough awareness of your preferences to think about if you want to try different strings. As a beginner it is important to focus on playing and distractions like thinking about strings can be detrimental.
I came here to say this^
 

UkingViking

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Ill join the group suggesting that you wear the Aquilas down untill they are dented from the frets, getting a feel of nylgut, and then experiment with some fluorocarbons.
Aquilas nylgut are fine strings, but like many I use fluorocarbon strings on many of my ukes. It is a denser materiale, so you can get the same weight, corresponding to the same tension, in a thinner string. That makes it more flexible which gives some benefits.
From the brands if have tried, aNueNue Clearwater, Worth Browns/Clears and Fremont Blackline, I prefer Worth Browns and clears. The Blacklines have a waxy touch and the Clearwater a harsh sound imo.
 

UkingViking

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If you try out Worth strings, the Browns have a slightly warmer sound than the Clears. But the difference is very subtle compared to the difference from nylgut to fluorocarbon.
 

stephenjm

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Thank you all for your helpful advice, I do like the strings that are on my ukulele right now,
I think they have a nice sound very bright and vibrant. and are also easy to play. just not sure which
brand they are, until now thanks to Cardia or heart in Greek :) I know that they are Aquila
Nylgut strings I will try out your suggestions when it is time for me to get new strings.
Thanks again,
Stephen
 

UkeOkay

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My recommendation for one's first non-Aquila strings has always been to try a set of Martin M600's. They sound good, are reasonably priced, and can often be found at your local music store. After that, if you then decide you like the fluorocarbon sound, then there is a vast world of variations and brands to explore.
 

Kenn2018

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Here is my take: I bought a Ohana TK-50G tenor from a local music store. It played and sounded okay, but was a little difficult to play. I took it back to the seller and had a setup done and it played much better. Then I read about fluorocarbons strings and tried a set. I think they were D'Addario. Wow! What a difference. I much preferred the sound to the Aquila Nylon derivatives. Easier on my fingers too!

But that's me. Strings are very personal preferences. What works for some people, falls short for others. What works on some instruments, doesn't on others. My go to string brand is Living Waters. I have them in Low-G and High-g on several tenors. But, I didn't like them at all on other tenors.

Some inexpensive ukuleles have been known to have very cheap Nylon string knock offs on them. (Not Kala.) Buying a good set of strings can make a big difference in sound in those instances.

As others have said, as long as you like the sound of the strings you have, keep using them. When they get worn, try something different. But don't get obsessed about changing them.

I do recommend that you have a spare set. Just in case you have a string break at an inopportune time.

Have fun trying new things. But put most of your time into learning to play new thiings as you also enjoy what you already know.
 

man0a

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Many cheap ukuleles from Amazon seem to be coming with thin nylon strings these days. I think these kind of make sense for beginners since they are easier on untrained fingers. Sound is maybe not as loud as name brand strings, but that's not such a bad thing for beginners either.