Best way to string this "problem" Ukulele (Physics)

Joralin

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Hello Guys,

i have a little problem with the bridge of one of my ukuleles.

They drilled the holes on 2 strings very close to the top.

Because of this, 2 holes are torn a bit now.

I stabilized everything a bit with glue, but now im asking myself, how i can prevent furter damage.


I tought about 2 different ways to put the strings on the Ukulele.


1. Standard Way., like a guitar is strung (The ukulele was string way when the damage happend):



2. A knot at the End:





What do you think? Which version would put less stress/damage on my ukulele bridge?
 
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Jim Hanks

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With that damage, I'd recommend bridge beads
 

merlin666

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There are the workarounds with strings but they are not pretty. Knots are for slotted style bridges, and beads are for kids toy instruments, but many adults use them on their ukes. If you are handy and have some tools you can fix this. Easiest way might be to extend the bridge with a strip of hardwood or plastic where the drilled holes match up at the bridge end but are at proper height, so need to drill at slight angle. If you have machine shop then route out about half of the bridge and put a matching strip of hardwood on top after adjusting the string channel.
 

Poul Hansen

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....... beads are for kids toy instruments,........ but many adults use them on their ukes. If you are handy and have some tools you can fix this. Easiest way might be to extend the bridge with a strip of hardwood or plastic where the drilled holes match up at the bridge end but are at proper height, so need to drill at slight angle. If you have machine shop then route out about half of the bridge and put a matching strip of hardwood on top after adjusting the string channel.
Beads will solve the problem and is NOT for toys and iS the easiest way, not a lot of tools and drilling and routing!!
 
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Neil_O

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There are the workarounds with strings but they are not pretty. Knots are for slotted style bridges, and beads are for kids toy instruments, but many adults use them on their ukes. If you are handy and have some tools you can fix this. Easiest way might be to extend the bridge with a strip of hardwood or plastic where the drilled holes match up at the bridge end but are at proper height, so need to drill at slight angle. If you have machine shop then route out about half of the bridge and put a matching strip of hardwood on top after adjusting the string channel
Use the beads. Avoid buying a machine shop and a luthier's training with one simple solution! Also, beads are not for children. They pose a choking hazard and lead to wildly over-engineered solutions to simple stuff.
 

Brad Bordessa

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My knee-jerk thought was to make a little metal plate that you could tie around as normal (held in place by the knots), but would hold the corner away from the holes that are tearing out.
 

Poul Hansen

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Beads are the answer. Anything glued or placed on top of he bridge will pull the strings up and lessen the angle over the saddle.

I used them to squeeze some extra years of life out of an old guitar, where the saddle was so low, that the angle was zero when binding the strings but it became functional with the beads.
 

Graham Greenbag

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I’d be inclined to try beads first, you might have enough angle on the strings to get away with attaching a plate onto the top part of the bridge so that’s a second option. A ‘string through’ modification hasn’t been mentioned yet (they can work well but mark-out and drill with great care) and neither has just fitting a new bridge, IMHO the later is the slightly better and best route but it is also the most costly and difficult one.
 
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EDW

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I would suggest having someone drill holes for a string through bridge. Clean look and would take care of the problem
 

Bill Sheehan

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Joralin, I have an older Ohana soprano with a similar bridge style, and it was showing evidence of a slight amount of bridge lift, so I very carefully drilled "string-thru" holes in the appropriate locations, and I now run the strings through those holes, inside the body of the uke, and secure them with little plastic beads (invisible from the outside). Somewhat to my surprise, it worked GREAT, and it is now one of my favorite ukes.