Broken wrist. Or how to cope with not playing the ukulele for 9-10 weeks

Plainsong

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You gotta listen to the doctor. I have a formerly broken left wrist that, though I can't bend it like the right one, gives me no problems fretting a uke. If you don't want problems on down the line, then that wrist needs to not be doing any work for a while. But if you don't mind a dodgy wrist, then by all means C and Am away.

I'm glad it wasn't worse than that though. Just give it a chance to heal and you'll be fine! :)
 

kvehe

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Oh, I am so sorry to hear about this! Good luck and tell your dulcimer I said hello.
 

Lalz

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You gotta listen to the doctor. I have a formerly broken left wrist that, though I can't bend it like the right one, gives me no problems fretting a uke. If you don't want problems on down the line, then that wrist needs to not be doing any work for a while. But if you don't mind a dodgy wrist, then by all means C and Am away.

I'm glad it wasn't worse than that though. Just give it a chance to heal and you'll be fine! :)

Definitely not doing any fretting or left-hand activity until I'm 100% healed, you're absolutely right. You only get one chance to heal right and I really need this hand fully-functioning for doing precision work, otherwise I'm in trouble. The uke neck will only be resting on the cast.
 

cantcook1

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Practice fingerpicking with right hand use capo to barr chords for a change.
 

mailman

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Sorry to hear about the broken wrist!! I broke my right wrist almost two years ago, and had to wear a cast for seven weeks. At first, I couldn't play uke at all, as the motion of strumming caused too much pain. Later I found I could strum with my thumb readily enough, and that is my preferred method, anyway. I was a bit concerned about marring the ukuleles with the cast, but I made sure to pad it sufficiently.

Your left wrist fracture is a whole different critter, though. By all means, follow the doctor's recommendations! Fretting is worlds apart from strumming.

What you might do to occupy some time, and have it be uke related, is to research and organize song sheets for future use. You could create binders of sheets, or learn the software for a tablet computer to work with song sheets; OnSong for the iPad has been highly recommended. Make set lists, organize by genre, set aside some that may be too difficult now, but that you'd like to learn later. Learn to use Chordie.com or other online song resources.

Good luck with the wrist, and let us know how you're getting on....
 

bonesigh

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Learn to play with you feet....like this guy....
OR turn it around and fret with your right hand. If you glued a felt pick onto your cast. I feel for you! I don't know what I'd do but I'd figure out a way. That's how addicted I am!
 

Ukulele JJ

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I corrected a couple of misspellings... ;)

Ack! Sorry about that. I thought "goofin' around and breaking a wrist" and my mind immediately went to "must be a guy". :)

Anyway, the Nashville Number System is a way of representing the chords to a song. But it has several advantages over the way you usually see chords on the internet (i.e., lyrics with chord names on top), such as...

  1. No lyrics are used. So you don't run into copyright issues (you can't copyright just a chord progression)
  2. Since it doesn't rely on lyrics for positioning the chords, it works for instrumentals and for those sections of songs (like intros) where there simply aren't any lyrics to anchor the chords to in the first place.
  3. One chart works for every key! Seriously, if you're playing along in G and decide you want to move it up to A to fit your voice better, you just do it--you don't have to rewrite the chart or anything.
  4. Working with them helps develop your ability to "hear" chords and figure out chords by ear yourself.

Here in Nashville, we really do use them. If you show up to play a recording session, or back up a songwriter on a gig, you more often than not will be given a number chart and be expected to know how to read and play from it.

JJ

P.S. I broke my wrist something fierce when I was a kid. Luckily, it was my right wrist and I could still hold a pick at least. :cool:
 

mds725

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Sorry about your injury. I hope you heal quickly and completely, and definitely listen to your doctor. I recommend physical therapy as soon as your doctor clears you for it. You not only have only one chance to heal the bones right, you only really get one chance to reactivate an injured joint once it can handle movement again. Don't rush anything, but be sure to ask your doctor about physical therapy when the time is right. Best wishes for as complete recovery!
 
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On topic, I broke the big toe on my left foot when I jumped off a ladder in flip-flops (thongs for all the colonists out there) a couple of years ago. I didn't bother going to the hospital, and as a result it sounds like someone stepping on a bag of broken crackers when I bend it.

For a toe, this isn't an issue, but if your wrist doesn't heal correctly, I can see it being a major problem.
 

AndrewKuker

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oh wow, so sorry. on the bright side a few months is not too bad, you'll be strummin before you know it. all this practicing fingerpicking and all though, are you guys serious? geez, why don't you just read the dictionary to learn some new words while your havin' fun.

Personally, I would set up a little keyboard and play around, sequencing is a ton of one handed fun.
 

PhilUSAFRet

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Yup, agree too. Follow doctor's orders, practice strums, rolls, fingerpicking, etc. etc. After your wrist heals, youll be amazed at how much better you will play. I do that by muting my strings and practicing them during commercials, during very boring parts of tv shows, etc. Sure has made a difference in my playing.
 

joeybug

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Having fractured my pelvis last September, I feel your pain! I wasn't able to play for about 6-8 weeks, but as others have suggested, work on theory, do some singing, practise open chords or finger picking, work on rolls..but above all else, feel better soon and don't disobey the doctors!