CAGED System for uke?

Pine Apple Slim

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Asked this in another thread, but I think it deserves its own thread.

Somewhere on the net, is there anyone who has broken the C reiterant neck down into a few simple moveable chord shapes/families? The same basic concept as the CAGED system for guitar?

I'm in the process of working all this out myself, but it would speed up my learning curve if someone else has already done the work and organized it.
 

Pine Apple Slim

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EDW, oninto the thread, I foud this, which is EXACTLY what I was looking for!!
file.php
 

lindydanny

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Careful not to fall into the CAGE, you may never get out. Seriously. I've played guitar for fifteen years and I just now started to learn that the CAGED system is great for beginners but you want to get away from it as soon as you've mastered it.

There are several problems with the system (both on guitar and uke). Mainly, it will limit your knowledge of chord construction (meaning music theory chord construction). A better method is once you learn these shapes, take the time to understand the basic 1-3-5-7 approach to chords and start building your own. You'll be redundant with some of what you already know and what has already been discovered by someone else, but your knowledge of music and the fret board (regardless of the instrument you do this on) will increase dramatically. You become not only a better player, but a better musician.

Again, I'm not saying you should learn the CAGED system (or its ukulele counterpart), but I am saying that you need to go a step further.

~DB
 

Pine Apple Slim

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Well aware of the trappings of CAGED (or CAGFD).
All I was looking for really was the chart above. A simple summary of each maj chord in each position, with a ref to the underlying shape, which will help me memorize the neck.
Most chord books/charts (IMO) overwhelm with too much information and are not organized into a practical system for grasping the layout of the fingerboard.
I had aready started figuring this out, but its nice to have a handy reference for a short while till it becomes ingrained.
I already know enough chord construction and scale theory to work things out from there.
 

OldePhart

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You know, it's kind of funny - I never could make head nor tails of the CAGED system on guitar. Then, I started playing bass, realized I could use the same box with barre chords on six-string and became a much better rhythm player. I have to say, CAGED still doesn't make any sense to me - guess I'm just thick that way! LOL

John
 

infidel

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I've written up my own little summary of moveable chords and the CAGED system as applied to the uke:
http://files.meetup.com/493577/Moveable Chords.pdf
You might find it useful.

I also have the Sokolow/Beloff book Fretboard Roadmaps and it covers the equivalent of the CAGED system for uke. They call it the 'G-D-B Roadmap'. I like the book.
 

Pine Apple Slim

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I've written up my own little summary of moveable chords and the CAGED system as applied to the uke:
http://files.meetup.com/493577/Moveable Chords.pdf
You might find it useful.

I also have the Sokolow/Beloff book Fretboard Roadmaps and it covers the equivalent of the CAGED system for uke. They call it the 'G-D-B Roadmap'. I like the book.

Thanks, thats a pretty good chart/summary.
I found one on another forum which got me started with what I was looking for:
http://www.ukulelecosmos.com/phpBB3/download/file.php?id=1343
 

cb56

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Thanks pineapple slim for that chart.
What has caused a bit of confusion for me with the fretboard roadmaps, is that what your chart calls an F shape (I agree) Fretboard roadmaps calls a G shape. And what your chart calls an A shape ( I agree again) they call it a B shape. IMO naming the shape by what it is in open position like your chart does, makes so much more sense to me.
 

OldePhart

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Thanks pineapple slim for that chart.
What has caused a bit of confusion for me with the fretboard roadmaps, is that what your chart calls an F shape (I agree) Fretboard roadmaps calls a G shape. And what your chart calls an A shape ( I agree again) they call it a B shape. IMO naming the shape by what it is in open position like your chart does, makes so much more sense to me.

And that's typically the way the closed shapes are named in the guitar world - don't know why that doesn't seem to follow into the uke world.

John
 

DWUke

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Not quite CAGED, but ...

Take a look at "Ukulele Breakthrough" by Calvin Chin. It's not the CAGED system, but gives an interesting approach to learning chords based on the root note, and the string.
 

Ambient Doughnut

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There was a good post on this on UkeHunt a while back.

http://ukulelehunt.com/2011/04/06/barre-chords-and-inversions/

It's on of those things I come back to now and then and makes a little more sense each time I delve into it.

You start to notice things - for example that the F shape and the G shape are essentially the same - also the C and the D shape. The more you look at a ukulele fretboard the simpler it becomes!
 
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OldePhart

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Oh, BTW, nothing to do with CAGED - but if you're looking for a "box" approach to movable uke chords you might want to check this blog page. Click on the M or "Box" charts for the ones most useful if you're looking for a "CAGED like" approach - though one caveat is that I still don't understand CAGED - this is the "box" from a bass player's perspective but applied to ukulele.

John