Charango bad intonation

aaronkb

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Can’t figure out what’s causing the issue, are you sure you’re not just looking for problems and convincing yourself you hear something?
 

Doug W

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Good replies. I got this from my kids 9 years ago on my 60th birthday. I think I will add a brace right where the top split and try to glue it all together, nothing to lose. It may hold together for ten minutes, then make its way into the fireplace.
 

richntacoma

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I think the problem is actually with the tonewood. These are made in the mountains above Lake Titicaca, on the Peruvian/Bolivian border. When you removed the tonewood from the humidity of 33.844 percent, which it always is on the mountain, intonation always suffers. You must go back, return the wood to its natural environment, find the correct shaman, hallucinate on wild herbs for three days, and do the hokie pokie. This will resolve the intonation problem--fact.
 
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aaronkb

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Good replies. I got this from my kids 9 years ago on my 60th birthday. I think I will add a brace right where the top split and try to glue it all together, nothing to lose. It may hold together for ten minutes, then make its way into the fireplace.
Did it look like that at the time
 

Doug W

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Here's the long story: In the mid 80's to early 90's, my family lived in Cochabamba Bolivia. I bought a charango in the market after being amazed by Andean music. I loaned the instrument to a neighbor kid and it never returned. So about 9 1/2 years ago, my kids bought this one for me online from Cochabamba and sad as it is to see that happen to an instrument, it is worth the jokes.

I don't know if the charango ever saw Lake Titicaca but I did.
 

richntacoma

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Here's the long story: In the mid 80's to early 90's, my family lived in Cochabamba Bolivia. I bought a charango in the market after being amazed by Andean music. I loaned the instrument to a neighbor kid and it never returned. So about 9 1/2 years ago, my kids bought this one for me online from Cochabamba and sad as it is to see that happen to an instrument, it is worth the jokes.

I don't know if the charango ever saw Lake Titicaca but I did.
Funny--I off to South America for up to two months starting in late June. Only plan is to start the trip in Colombia with a friend. After that, a lot of going with the flow. Cochabamba is actually on the list of I make it that far south. Not my first rodeo, have spent time in Colombia, Peru, Argentina and Chile.

You might fine this amazing/interesting. I am going to have some lessons from tiple and charango players/teachers. I am going to be on my uke, but I want them to teach me their strumming techniques--super excited about this!
 

Doug W

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Funny--I off to South America for up to two months starting in late June. Only plan is to start the trip in Colombia with a friend. After that, a lot of going with the flow. Cochabamba is actually on the list of I make it that far south. Not my first rodeo, have spent time in Colombia, Peru, Argentina and Chile.

You might fine this amazing/interesting. I am going to have some lessons from tiple and charango players/teachers. I am going to be on my uke, but I want them to teach me their strumming techniques--super excited about this!
Ooh, can I come?
Here are 3 suggestions:

1.) On a Friday night get anticuchos from a street vendor. Is it a good idea to eat street food on a trip? Who knows?

2.) There is a park called Tunari in the mountains around Cochabamba and there is this small trout filled lake called Wara Wara. Great view from there and if you are a fisherman an extra bonus. We never checked into the fishing license question but never saw any park rangers either.

3.) If you see a kid named Marcos carrying a charango, (he will be around 45 now), ask him if he ever lived on Avenida America and if he says "Yes", grab the charango and run. You can drop it off at our place in Minneapolis after your trip.

Thanks
 
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