Chords That Make You Fret

ukudancer

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Thanks Ukantor - a barred Eb is such a good idea for me since I find it awkward to get to quickly. Odd that I never thought of it by myself considering I prefer to play the D chord 2225.

I was the opposite. I never thought to play the D chord that way even though I barre the Eb. lmao This thread has been a great exchange of knowledge already.
 

Elin

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Hi Elin,

Your post makes me wonder if the strings on your uke are set at the optimum height at the nut/first fret. Making a successful barre/bar close to the nut should not be that difficult. Forgive me if you already know this, but try pressing each string down at the third fret, and checking how much clearance there then is between the string and the first fret. The clearance should be minimal - no more than the thickness of a piece of paper.

I hope this helps,

John Colter

Hi John!

Thanks for the tip -string height is something I've only just come across, so this was really helpful! I've checked, and it's as you say - no more than a piece of paper. I do have a bit of weakness in my left hand, which might be my problem. I played around with holding my forefinger in the bar position across the strings, and have found a more comfortable method of rolling my finger to the side a little. Seems to have made it a little better, but perhaps I just need to strengthen my hand a little XD Thanks for the tip!

Elin
 

ripock

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Elin,
Instead of pressing into the fretboard with ever-increasing pressure, try pulling down. Make your hand heavy and let it drop the way gravity wants it to, and grasp your fretboard with the intention of not letting your fingers get pulled off. It takes a lot less pressure than mashing the strings into the fretboard.
 

ukudancer

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This might be the best explanation on how to fret strings:

https://youtu.be/w4a2ge9N31E?t=463

I honestly wish I had this lesson when I started playing guitar 20 years ago. I tried it on my uke the moment I saw it and it totally makes things so much easier and more comfortable than just mashing down as hard as you can. I realize we're talking about barre chords, but this concept should apply to all chord shapes.
 
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Elin

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Elin,
Instead of pressing into the fretboard with ever-increasing pressure, try pulling down. Make your hand heavy and let it drop the way gravity wants it to, and grasp your fretboard with the intention of not letting your fingers get pulled off. It takes a lot less pressure than mashing the strings into the fretboard.

This might be the best explanation on how to fret strings:

https://youtu.be/w4a2ge9N31E?t=463

I honestly wish I had this lesson when I started playing guitar 20 years ago. I tried it on my uke the moment I saw it and it totally makes things so much easier and more comfortable than just mashing down as hard as you can. I realize we're talking about barre chords, but this concept should apply to all chord shapes.

Oooo of course, I never thought of that! I'll give it a try :D
 

tm3

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Dm7

Actually, D itself is probably more of a problem since it comes up so much.
 

LorenFL

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Dm7

Actually, D itself is probably more of a problem since it comes up so much.

Another case of "depends on your fingers". I find D to be one of the easiest chords to make because my first finger joint easily reverse-bends so I can cover those three strings while skipping the bottom one. It's as easy as any "one finger, one fret" chord for me.

Dm is the same. Two strings with the tip of that middle finger, and drop the index fingertip down on the next string.

Dm7... slightly more difficult. Dm, and drop either the ring finger or pinky finger down on the bottom string.

I guess I can do that reverse fingertip bend a lot easier than I can a forward finger bend... so, these chords are a breeze for me. But, any kind of barre chord that requires me to keep a finger STRAIGHT while bending the finger next to it. Well, it just doesn't happen! Not with any accuracy, anyway.
 

ripock

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Another case of "depends on your fingers". I find D to be one of the easiest chords to make because my first finger joint easily reverse-bends so I can cover those three strings while skipping the bottom one. It's as easy as any "one finger, one fret" chord for me.

Dm is the same. Two strings with the tip of that middle finger, and drop the index fingertip down on the next string.

Dm7... slightly more difficult. Dm, and drop either the ring finger or pinky finger down on the bottom string.

I guess I can do that reverse fingertip bend a lot easier than I can a forward finger bend... so, these chords are a breeze for me. But, any kind of barre chord that requires me to keep a finger STRAIGHT while bending the finger next to it. Well, it just doesn't happen! Not with any accuracy, anyway.

I agree. With my body, to get a Dm I just make an F and then smoosh the middle finger down. For those straight-fingered barre chords like a D7 with the root on the C string, I too find it difficult. Sometimes I find I can do it if I plant the finger first and then lay down the index finger. But normally, I use my middle finger instead of the index finger and use the ring finger for the single note.
 

tm3

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Sure wish I could get me some of those reverse-bend fingers!