Does anyone know what type of ukulele would be common for early blues players?

Snowbeast

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So there are a few blues ukulele players like rabbit muse(usually played baritone),lemon nash,and Joe Linthecome from the 1920's and up. What type of ukuleles would be available to them? I am thinking they played martins but I am not sure what other ukuleles would be around back then on the mainland. Here is an image of Joe Linthecome and his ukulele and here are some pictures of Rabbit Muse.
 

Neil_O

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So there are a few blues ukulele players like rabbit muse(usually played baritone),lemon nash,and Joe Linthecome from the 1920's and up. What type of ukuleles would be available to them? I am thinking they played martins but I am not sure what other ukuleles would be around back then on the mainland. Here is an image of Joe Linthecome and his ukulele and here are some pictures of Rabbit Muse.
Wow, these are awesome links! The Lemon Nash video states: Martin Style 1.
 
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Snowbeast

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Wow, these are awesome links! The Lemon Nash video states: Martin Style 1.
I am glad you like them. I have been researching more about early blues ukulele, it's really interesting and sounds fantastic. If you are interested in early blues I definitely recommend this course. It's really awesome seeing ukulele blues outside of the basic stuff you see on youtube.
 

BigJackBrass

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Most of the early players would have used a soprano or a banjolele, simply because that was all that was available regardless of brand. Baritones in particularly were a much later innovation, but many players did shift to tenors when those appeared (changes in recording technology helped: the sharp staccato bark of a soprano worked better in the studio until electric recordings started in the mid-twenties).

Inevitably, a great many early blues players used whatever they could get, which meant store rebrands and Martin copies as well as the “real thing” when they could afford it. I don’t know how common Hawaiian brands were for blues: don’t recall seeing them in photos particularly, but then they may have been a more expensive choice and less favoured sound. Cliff Edwards said in one interview that his first “ukulele” was actually a mandolin he borrowed and restrung.

Lardy’s Ukulele Database is currently transferring to a new site, otherwise I’d suggest looking there for likely instruments.
 

merlin666

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Most of the early players would have used a soprano or a banjolele, simply because that was all that was available regardless of brand. Baritones in particularly were a much later innovation, but many players did shift to tenors when those appeared (changes in recording technology helped: the sharp staccato bark of a soprano worked better in the studio until electric recordings started in the mid-twenties).

Inevitably, a great many early blues players used whatever they could get, which meant store rebrands and Martin copies as well as the “real thing” when they could afford it. I don’t know how common Hawaiian brands were for blues: don’t recall seeing them in photos particularly, but then they may have been a more expensive choice and less favoured sound. Cliff Edwards said in one interview that his first “ukulele” was actually a mandolin he borrowed and restrung.

Lardy’s Ukulele Database is currently transferring to a new site, otherwise I’d suggest looking there for likely instruments.
I agree that they would have used mainland built ukes that were readily available and affordable. I doubt that there was mass production and mass shipping from the islands as they were not nearly as populated as today and more agricultural oriented. Here are some pictures of the kinds of ukes that they may have used
 
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