E+ chord?

Nickie

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Does anyone know the E+ chord on ukulele? Or is it strictly a guitar chord? I haven't been able to find a diagram of it.
 

Arcy

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Could it be an Eaug? I've seen + used for that and https://hellomusictheory.com/learn/augmented-chords/ seems to agree. So that'd be 1003 (I think).
Darn it! I need to type faster!

tenor.gif
 

ripock

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Does anyone know the E+ chord on ukulele? Or is it strictly a guitar chord? I haven't been able to find a diagram of it.
I primarily play in E and I mostly play G#+ in that key, but here's how I play E+
root on G string: 988X
root on C string: x443 or 544x; x16 15 15
root on E string: 13 12 12 or 12 12 11
root on A string: x887
 

LorenFL

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As noted, a "+" usually indicated "augmented".

I keep this tab open in my browser always. Good for answering questions like this, and "discovering" lots of other things.

 

ripock

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This thread is interesting, but now that we have established what it is and how to form it, what do you guys do with the augmented chord. I struggle to find a use for mine. I sometimes use it as a hiccup for the tonic chord since they are so similar: e.g. playing Em/g#+/Em just to break up the monotony of a straight Em chord. I have also tried resolving to a E+ rather than a E chord. The benefit is that the E+ kind of resolves but it also has this underlying feel where although the E part of the chord is happy to be the center of the progression, the + part feels like it would rather go somewhere else.
 

VintageGibson

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This thread is interesting, but now that we have established what it is and how to form it, what do you guys do with the augmented chord. I struggle to find a use for mine. I sometimes use it as a hiccup for the tonic chord since they are so similar: e.g. playing Em/g#+/Em just to break up the monotony of a straight Em chord. I have also tried resolving to a E+ rather than a E chord. The benefit is that the E+ kind of resolves but it also has this underlying feel where although the E part of the chord is happy to be the center of the progression, the + part feels like it would rather go somewhere else.
The augmented chord appears frequently in older Tin Pan Alley songs as a "passing" chord or sometimes at the end of the verse leading to the chorus.
Vintage
 

ripock

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Thanks. I am a big fan of Tommasso (hello internet) Zillio. I will definitely look into it
 

ripock

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I played around and made some awesome progress. None of it is revolutionary; I merely had never thought about it before.

We all know the diagonal Δ7 shape. For example FΔ7 is 10 9 8 7. All you do is lower the C string a fret to 10 8 8 7 and you have the one augmented shape. Then to play any augmented chord you just move the shape until your target note is covered by one of your fingers and you have your augmented chord in the key you want.

It is completely the same as a °7. If you want to play a F#°7, you just move the shape around until one of the four fingers is covering the F#.

I realize the Ubulele basically said this up above, but it didn't really sink in until I actually tinkered around and did it for myself. Now it is ingrained in my fingers and mind.
 

ripock

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Um, the augmented shape would not be 10 8 8 7 but 9 8 8 7. In other words, you'd have to drop both the 3rd and 4th string positions one fret (or raise the 1st and 2nd string positions).
Yeah, I know. I just misspoke. It is just the 3221 shape. I may have misexplained it, but the principle is still solid. I make a Δ7 shape and then squish it down. I'm still excited about finally visualizing it...even if I cannot describe it.
 

Nickie

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I primarily play in E and I mostly play G#+ in that key, but here's how I play E+
root on G string: 988X
root on C string: x443 or 544x; x16 15 15
root on E string: 13 12 12 or 12 12 11
root on A string: x887
I flunked theory, so I don't understand this...
 

Nickie

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As noted, a "+" usually indicated "augmented".

I keep this tab open in my browser always. Good for answering questions like this, and "discovering" lots of other things.

Thanks, I like pictures. This makes sense.
 

ripock

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Just an update.

I have been having a lot of fun with the augmented chords. Once it sank into my head that there's only one shape, I adjusted my mind and technique (I always play triads as triads) and I've been using them...perhaps too much. It is like starting with the harmonica. When you first get the harmonica, you overblow/bend everything. It isn't 'til later that discretion is learnt.
 

VegasGeorge

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Everyone here is right, the "+" means augmented, i.e. a raised 5th in the chord. Less frequently, it's seen as "#5" or "M#5." Most common, however, is plain old "Aug."
 

ripock

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i forgot to mention what I'm doing with the auggies. I don't think I am using them like I am supposed to--merely because that's not what's in my head. I have been using them:

1. as a replacement for a dom7 chord for making a slightly more sassy progression
2. as a hiccup or a variation. E.g., Em - E+ Em. Or Em, E+, and then move on
3. as a chord to play over the Enigmatic scale. I use the Enigmatic because it has a 5+; I tried using scales I already knew, but taking the 5 out of the scale was screwing with my head.

In general, I found that the aug in both linear and re-entrant voicings worked well with the aforementioned Enigmatic scale and with minor pentatonics. With modes of the harmonic minor there was a clash of sounds. Of course, if you play it twice, then the clash is intentional. But if you're just improvising, it doesn't sound quite right.
 

Down Up Dick

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Ahhh, the good ol’ Ubu. Anyway, yes, I admit that theory and almost anything about chords is outta my pay grade. I’m a self taught, seat of the pants musician. I told you once before that my favorite thing about music is the study of it. Unfortunately, perhaps, only at my level.

My comment was just a spot of humor to brighten up your day. No? Ahhh, well . . . mea culpa . . .
 

ripock

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It is just a case of words getting in the way of things we're trying to say. In short the Harmonic Minor has by definition a b6 which is the same as an augmented fifth. So the Harmonic Minor is compatible with augmented chords...as long as you avoid the natural fifth interval.
 

Nickie

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Down Up Dick, I concur, I never started understanding music theory at all until I started trying to learn to play bass.
None of it makes a bit of sense reading about it, to me. Nor on the ukulele. Just the bass. Why? Who knows.