E+ chord?

Nickie

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Does anyone know the E+ chord on ukulele? Or is it strictly a guitar chord? I haven't been able to find a diagram of it.
 

Arcy

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Could it be an Eaug? I've seen + used for that and https://hellomusictheory.com/learn/augmented-chords/ seems to agree. So that'd be 1003 (I think).
Darn it! I need to type faster!

tenor.gif
 

ripock

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Does anyone know the E+ chord on ukulele? Or is it strictly a guitar chord? I haven't been able to find a diagram of it.
I primarily play in E and I mostly play G#+ in that key, but here's how I play E+
root on G string: 988X
root on C string: x443 or 544x; x16 15 15
root on E string: 13 12 12 or 12 12 11
root on A string: x887
 

ubulele

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I like to play movable shapes, so I usually play 5443. Every note in this shape can serve as the root, and if you move it up (or down) by four frets, you get the same chord again. So with this one shape you can play every aug chord (by name), and you never have to shift position more than two frets up or down (maybe three frets up from the nut) in order to play the aug chord you want in the fretboard region you like. In this respect, it's much like main dim7 shape, like 2323.

In addition to first position 1003 for E+, you can play 100x (muting or just not playing the 1st string).
 

LorenFL

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As noted, a "+" usually indicated "augmented".

I keep this tab open in my browser always. Good for answering questions like this, and "discovering" lots of other things.

 

ubulele

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WARNING: More than you want to know follows. (TLDR)

Yes, a lone + directly after a pitch name means aug: A#+ = A#aug = A#(#5) (yuck). Also, + in trailing position means "#5", which is the same effect that the "aug" suffix has: to raise the 5th a half-step. Thus, you might see G7+, which means the same thing as G7#5, G7+5, Gaug7 and G+7. Note that in G+7, because the + directly follows the pitch name, it "binds" to the pitch name with the aug or "raised 5th" interpretation; it does not bind with the 7 to raise the 7th. So G+7 means G+ (Gaug) extended with a minor 7th.

That said, there are competing if less common conventions in which + always binds with a following number. If there is none (i.e., in trailing position or before another suffix like "add" or "sus"), it defaults to raising the 5th, as in aug chords. So some notators may use G+7 for Gmaj7, not Gaug7 or G7#5, and G+9 for G7#9, not Gaug9 or G9#5. I've even seen a third interpretation of G+9, which is Gadd#9, but this is rare. Generally, the binding rule I first mentioned applies, but be aware that some folks use this other binding rule. (I personally find it more consistent, concise and readable to apply the "always bind with what follows" rule, and I use it in my private song sheets, but when writing for readers at large, I revert to the more prevailing convention.)

In positions where + is allowed to bind with a following number, it raises that interval from it's default, so G7+9 = G7#9; it can be seen as synonymous with #. However + is (I feel) more readable than either aug or #, and can be used in positions and situations where the others cannot be:

Gaug7: augmented triad which is then extended.
G+7; ditto; + binds with G with the meaning "aug".
G7aug: NO; aug indicates the base triad type and so should always follow the root name immediately.
G7+: okay; a dominant 7th chord with an altered 5th, identical to Gaug7 / G+7
G7#: NO; the number for a sharp alteration is never defaulted.
G7+5: okay; raising the 5th is explicit, and 7 separates G from +, so binding is not an issue.
G#+: cool, = G#aug
G#5: NO; the sharp here binds with the pitch name: this means a G# power chord, not Gaug.
G##5: NO; this doesn't mean G#aug but rather a G-double-sharp power chord (Gx5 or, enharmonically, A5).
G#57: NO; see G#5 above. Also, #5 is always an alteration, and alterations never precede extensions like 7.
G(#5) or G#(#5): I've seen them, but I wouldn't use them. The parentheses override the binding rules, so the meaning is unambiguous and there's no violation of suffix ordering rules, but this notation will throw a lot of folks, and why use it when you can write Gaug or, more simply, G+?
G(#5)7: NO; as noted before, #5 is always an alteration and cannot precede an extension. In contrast, + can serve as either a base triad indicator (a direct substitute for aug) or as an alteration.
G+5: I'm saying NO, mainly because the intent is unclear. It could either mean the same as G+ (Gaug), or a "power chord" of just G(s) and D#(s)—no third (B). If you mean the former, just write G+; if you mean the latter, then write G+no3—it's longer but crystal clear. (And if you mean a major triad with an added #5, write Gaddb6 or possibly G(b6)—b6 is enharmonically equivalent to #5, and avoids the problem of two components with the same general degree. Gadd#5 is grudgingly acceptable; however, some may think you mean plain Gaug.)

I should also mention that you shouldn't mix the +/- conventions with the #/b alteration conventions; best to stick with one style or the other. There is one common exception, and that is the use of + as a stand-in for aug: G+ used along with names like G7#5 and D9b5.

'll save discussion of "-" usage for another day. It has its own vagaries.
 

ripock

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This thread is interesting, but now that we have established what it is and how to form it, what do you guys do with the augmented chord. I struggle to find a use for mine. I sometimes use it as a hiccup for the tonic chord since they are so similar: e.g. playing Em/g#+/Em just to break up the monotony of a straight Em chord. I have also tried resolving to a E+ rather than a E chord. The benefit is that the E+ kind of resolves but it also has this underlying feel where although the E part of the chord is happy to be the center of the progression, the + part feels like it would rather go somewhere else.
 

VintageGibson

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This thread is interesting, but now that we have established what it is and how to form it, what do you guys do with the augmented chord. I struggle to find a use for mine. I sometimes use it as a hiccup for the tonic chord since they are so similar: e.g. playing Em/g#+/Em just to break up the monotony of a straight Em chord. I have also tried resolving to a E+ rather than a E chord. The benefit is that the E+ kind of resolves but it also has this underlying feel where although the E part of the chord is happy to be the center of the progression, the + part feels like it would rather go somewhere else.
The augmented chord appears frequently in older Tin Pan Alley songs as a "passing" chord or sometimes at the end of the verse leading to the chorus.
Vintage
 

ubulele

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Primarily, I find augmented chords serving as passing chords (particularly from V to I—V[7] V+ I) to inject extra tension before resolution or to lead a voice smoothly and chromatically (by half-steps), rather than by more clunky whole steps.

Augmented triads also morph easily into a complex of major and minor triads (and their derivatives). While the augmented triads aren't quite as flexible as dim7 chords (any of which may connect virtually any two other chords), the richness of possible progression opportunities makes them act like musical roundabouts, redirecting from one direction to many others in a smooth manner.

Because each note in an augmented triad could be the root of the chord, and each chord could connect between so many alternatives, augmented chords can be used as pivot chords in modulations, particularly modulations to keys that are not closely related harmonically. (Dim7 chords have even greater root ambiguity and connecting possibilities, and can be used in a similar way.)

One thing that commonly happens before a modulation is to prepare the listener for the big change by using a destabilizing chord, one that builds up tension or is particularly open to ambiguous interpretation. An augmented chord is such a chord, so even if you don't use it as an actual pivot for modulation, you can use it right before the pivot, for the purpose of preparation and signaling. Or you can use it to psychologically prepare for a direct modulation (unlinked jump directly into another key).

A few YouTube videos by Tommasso Zillio which will explain most of this stuff more clearly:
Augmented chords
Augmented modulations
Dim7 modulations
Destabilization before modulation

Songs that use augmented chords (from David Bennett)
 

ripock

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Thanks. I am a big fan of Tommasso (hello internet) Zillio. I will definitely look into it
 

ripock

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I played around and made some awesome progress. None of it is revolutionary; I merely had never thought about it before.

We all know the diagonal Δ7 shape. For example FΔ7 is 10 9 8 7. All you do is lower the C string a fret to 10 8 8 7 and you have the one augmented shape. Then to play any augmented chord you just move the shape until your target note is covered by one of your fingers and you have your augmented chord in the key you want.

It is completely the same as a °7. If you want to play a F#°7, you just move the shape around until one of the four fingers is covering the F#.

I realize the Ubulele basically said this up above, but it didn't really sink in until I actually tinkered around and did it for myself. Now it is ingrained in my fingers and mind.
 

ubulele

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I hope not too ingrained, because the augmented shape would not be 10 8 8 7 but 9 8 8 7. In other words, you'd have to drop both the 3rd and 4th string positions one fret (or raise the 1st and 2nd string positions).

You can also use 2114 or 1443 as movable augmented triad shapes, and again any position in the shape could be the root—slide the shape up or down until you're fingering the root you want, and there you go. These alternative voicings sound more distinct in linear tunings, but learning them all may be a bit overkill.
 
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ripock

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Um, the augmented shape would not be 10 8 8 7 but 9 8 8 7. In other words, you'd have to drop both the 3rd and 4th string positions one fret (or raise the 1st and 2nd string positions).
Yeah, I know. I just misspoke. It is just the 3221 shape. I may have misexplained it, but the principle is still solid. I make a Δ7 shape and then squish it down. I'm still excited about finally visualizing it...even if I cannot describe it.
 

Nickie

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I primarily play in E and I mostly play G#+ in that key, but here's how I play E+
root on G string: 988X
root on C string: x443 or 544x; x16 15 15
root on E string: 13 12 12 or 12 12 11
root on A string: x887
I flunked theory, so I don't understand this...
 

Nickie

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As noted, a "+" usually indicated "augmented".

I keep this tab open in my browser always. Good for answering questions like this, and "discovering" lots of other things.

Thanks, I like pictures. This makes sense.