Entry to Mid Level Soprano or Concert Uke Suitable for the Blues ?

kaimuki

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Of course the blues can sound good on any Uke .
Any you think are especially suited ?
I think maybe the Martin C1K .
This thick bodied Ohana SK-50wg soprano sounds suitable :
 

UkingViking

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I would go for something jangly in the sound.
So perhaps Acacia/Blackwood/Koa or the like.

My Cort Blackwood is very jangly, so much I use it mostly for bluesy or folky stuff. But they are out of production.
The Martin is probably a good idea. I never tried one, but the build should be similar if not better, and the looks go well with blues.

A resonator would perhaps also be an interesting.
 

EDW

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Yes, all kinds of instruments could be used. Maybe check out Manitoba Hal for inspiration


or Lil Rev


Both have lots of stuff to watch on YouTube
 

kaimuki

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Yes, all kinds of instruments could be used. Maybe check out Manitoba Hal for inspiration


or Lil Rev


Both have lots of stuff to watch on YouTube
https://www.kanileaukulele.com/featured_item/lil-rev/

Lil-Rev-Kanilea-Custom-ST-landscape.jpeg
 

Jag-Stang

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I actually play a lot of blues but as a guitar and harmonica player that has done even a bit of studio work on blues harmonica, Ukulele are newer to me over the past few years. I have tried out quite a bit of Sopranos as I started on a Baritone as it is tuned like a guitar and was determined to try to learn Soprano. I am still in my learning stage. I do know what you mean by jangly and I have a Martin S-O soprano that fits that description and I like it for blues. It is one of those 12 fret no frills made in Mexico Martins that they do not make any longer. I bought mine second hand ($185) and they turn up under $200 pretty regularly. I do not agree about koa it is mellow and Mahogany has always been the standard for blues guitar and it works for Ukulele as well. I recently told another member that I am impressed with the 30’s and 40’s Gretsch Ukuleles and that as they are reasonably cheap you get a lot of bang for the buck and a jangly sounding instrument, I see them turn up in the $100-200 range which if in good shape I think is a bargain, yet another inexpensive suggestion. The great blues Artists seemed to make do with cheap mahogany or even plywood guitars and from my view it is the same for Ukulele. Even better the more beat up the guitar the better it seemed to sound so cosmetic issues should be overlooked in searching for a “blues” Soprano Ukulele.
 

kaimuki

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I actually play a lot of blues but as a guitar and harmonica player that has done even a bit of studio work on blues harmonica, Ukulele are newer to me over the past few years. I have tried out quite a bit of Sopranos as I started on a Baritone as it is tuned like a guitar and was determined to try to learn Soprano. I am still in my learning stage. I do know what you mean by jangly and I have a Martin S-O soprano that fits that description and I like it for blues. It is one of those 12 fret no frills made in Mexico Martins that they do not make any longer. I bought mine second hand ($185) and they turn up under $200 pretty regularly. I do not agree about koa it is mellow and Mahogany has always been the standard for blues guitar and it works for Ukulele as well. I recently told another member that I am impressed with the 30’s and 40’s Gretsch Ukuleles and that as they are reasonably cheap you get a lot of bang for the buck and a jangly sounding instrument, I see them turn up in the $100-200 range which if in good shape I think is a bargain, yet another inexpensive suggestion. The great blues Artists seemed to make do with cheap mahogany or even plywood guitars and from my view it is the same for Ukulele. Even better the more beat up the guitar the better it seemed to sound so cosmetic issues should be overlooked in searching for a “blues” Soprano Ukulele.
Mahalo ; very helpful .
 

DuckyI

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I would imagine that a big sounding uke with a percussive string would sound very good. Maybe a vintage Martin Style 0 with some black nylon strings?
 

Jag-Stang

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I would imagine that a big sounding uke with a percussive string would sound very good. Maybe a vintage Martin Style 0 with some black nylon strings?
I recommended the Martin S-O the inexpensive Mexican 12 fret Martins and as I have a Martin style 1 from the prewar era I think that these Mexican Martin O’s are much more jangly and blues-like They have that big sound (I actually like the D’addario strings few talk about here) with that Ukulele and It certainly is a good fit for blues. It would be a waste putting a set of Worths on it. But I do agree the Martin O’s work I just prefer the Mexican builds they just have a raw sound not so balanced as the better built Nazareth Ukuleles. There is a you tube video although not blues related showing the differences in sound I can’t seem to load it it is done by Peter Forrest if you know how to post this it would be helpful in terms of sound.

Comparison of the new Martin soprano ukuleles: OXK, SO, S1, Style 2, 2K​

 
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kaimuki

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I recommended the Martin S-O the inexpensive Mexican 12 fret Martins and as I have a Martin style 1 from the prewar era I think that these Mexican Martin O’s are much more jangly and blues-like They have that big sound (I actually like the D’addario strings few talk about here) with that Ukulele and It certainly is a good fit for blues. It would be a waste putting a set of Worths on it. But I do agree the Martin O’s work I just prefer the Mexican builds they just have a raw sound not so balanced as the better built Nazareth Ukuleles. There is a you tube video although not blues related showing the differences in sound I can’t seem to load it it is done by Peter Forrest if you know how to post this it would be helpful in terms of sound.

Comparison of the new Martin soprano ukuleles: OXK, SO, S1, Style 2, 2K​

Which D'addario ?
 

Ukecaster

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I love playing blues on sopranos, big fun! I have 2 Famous/Kiwaya sopranos, and both work great for blues, as would most decent sopranos. IMO, they are among the best sops you can often find for under $200 00, like this one.

 
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kissing

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Some would say if you wanted to play the Blues on ukulele:

 

Jag-Stang

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Which D'addario ?
22FC4858-728E-4A15-93F2-031052B8D733.jpegThese are black strings similar in feel to the Aquila nylout strings but I think a little
funkier sounding. I like them for the bluesy sound, and I like both the look and feel at least for my Martin S-O and they are inexpensive strings.
 
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ripock

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This is completely subjective but I often consider ukulele blues silly. It is like playing a funeral dirge with a kazoo or a slide whistle, or like Nina Simone singing Nicki Minaj songs: it just sounds ridiculous. However I consider myself a Roots musician and play a lot of blues-based things and here's what I do: 1. play in low G and 2. loosen the tension of the strings to make them less shimmery/chimey. I typically play in A tuning, 3 half steps looser than GCEA. That gives the timbre a little more bathos. Patently this only applies to chords, because notes are notes when finger picked. And again, I want to remind everyone this is very subjective. If a standard uke offers no problems to your ear, then go for it.
 

Neil_O

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This is completely subjective but I often consider ukulele blues silly. It is like playing a funeral dirge with a kazoo or a slide whistle, or like Nina Simone singing Nicki Minaj songs: it just sounds ridiculous. However I consider myself a Roots musician and play a lot of blues-based things and here's what I do: 1. play in low G and 2. loosen the tension of the strings to make them less shimmery/chimey. I typically play in A tuning, 3 half steps looser than GCEA. That gives the timbre a little more bathos. Patently this only applies to chords, because notes are notes when finger picked. And again, I want to remind everyone this is very subjective. If a standard uke offers no problems to your ear, then go for it.
I'd like to hear Nina Simone sing some Nicki Minaj, please provide link!