Enya is Kaka :)

kaimuki

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I'm confused .
I read that they're the same brand ; Kaka is marketed in China / Asia , while Enya is sold in the USA / and other Western markets .
Generally the Kaka gets bad reviews while the Enya gets glowing reviews .
So , I'm confused .
More specifically , I'm asking about the Enya EUC-25D .
The Kaka EUS-25D was trashed in one reviewer on a well known site .
 

merlin666

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Guess the Asians are more picky with their reviews and have different uke preferences than the Americans.
 

man0a

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When the company first appeared in the USA a few years ago, they were called Kaka here, too. Are they still called Kaka in Asia? I see Feng E (in Taiwan) playing an Enya sometimes, but never a Kaka.
 

mikelz777

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I think we know what Kaka means in slang but does it mean something else in another language or culture?
 

badhabits

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I wonder if that was an attempted ripoff of kala gone horribly wrong...so instead they ripoff an old Irish singer. 😄
 

Peter Frary

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Well, maybe it was named after the Maori name for a parrot or, perhaps, a certain Brazilian soccer player with a terrible nickname.
 

badhabits

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According to a page I just read, KaKa is a Japanese way of talking about the pleasant scent of a flower. So perhaps it would be a useful hook word if you are selling ukes to Japanese speakers.

As in Enya is a nice hook word for English speakers and Kaka is a nice hook word for Japanese speakers? Its just marketing into different language groups.

If you have not realised that Asian made ukuleles are made in production runs for various merchandising companies, and one of the last steps is to apply a brand name, then maybe you need to wake up?

The differences between merchandising companies that sell you the uke can be important, some offer better service and warranty than others, but sometimes they are selling the same ukes from the same production runs. So in some cases it will pay to take note of the name on the headstock. But, in general the low cost Asian ukes wont have a lot of re-sale value, so sometimes it wont matter if you ignore the name on the headstock and just look for a low cost uke that suits your needs.
Maybe they just took the ma out of kamaka…