Exploring 100 year old (your) ukes

richntacoma

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In another discussion, someone commented on how cool it would be if we posted pictures (and discussed, says I) our 100 year old ukes.

Here is my 1920 Weymann enjoying being played around Colombia. It goes back to South America for a couple of months in about four weeks!
 

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richntacoma

richntacoma

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In another discussion, someone commented on how cool it would be if we posted pictures (and discussed, says I) our 100 year old ukes.

Here is my 1920s Weymann enjoying being played around Colombia. It goes back to South America for a couple of months in about four weeks!

Great thread idea, Rich! Love it!
Your idea--I just executed.
 

donboody

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I am wondering if our team efforts here may have opened a pandora's box of new UAS types, including one where the afflicted must acquire an ukulele that they are able to post in this thread?
 

Patty

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In another discussion, someone commented on how cool it would be if we posted pictures (and discussed, says I) our 100 year old ukes.

Here is my 1920s Weymann enjoying being played around Colombia. It goes back to South America for a couple of months in about four weeks!
It’s lovely—what a nice traveling companion.

Another thought: Do the oldies hold their own, sound-wise, or has ukulele development in the intervening century improved the instrument’s voice?
 
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richntacoma

richntacoma

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It’s lovely—what a nice traveling companion.

Another thought: Do the oldies hold their own, sound-wise, or has ukulele development in the intervening century improved the instrument’s voice?
My 1920 Weymann is fantastic sounding. I had a 1920s Harmony (Winner branded) that was far less rich, a bit flat actually, and sold it. I regretted selling it, as even though it was not the best sounding uke, I loved the feel in my hands.
 

CPG

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This is my 1918 Weymann Model 10. I bought it from a dear friend, so in addition to being an amazing instrument it has sentimental value to me. I also like the fact that it was made in Philly. Oh, and I sent it to Jake Wildwood to get setup and get Pegheds installed on. I felt a little sacriligious replacing the wooden pegs and while I got them working pretty well with a bit of peg dope I'm glad I had the Pegheds put on.

DCA77EFE-FEDA-4940-BFA0-C7869D3820B2.JPG81275BF1-E875-48E0-8115-0D5781861936.JPG
 

CPG

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It’s lovely—what a nice traveling companion.

Another thought: Do the oldies hold their own, sound-wise, or has ukulele development in the intervening century improved the instrument’s voice?
They more than hold there own.They surpass most (but certainly not all) modern sorpanos tonally. The good ones do anyway. Here's a quick sound sample I just recorded. Excuse the flubs. It's a simple piece I'm playing, but I haven't played it in a while. I don't think my playing here does the instrument justice. Perhaps I will rerecord something later.

 
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Patty

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This is my 1918 Weymann Model 10. I bought it from a dear friend, so in addition to being an amazing instrument it has sentimental value to me. I also like the fact that it was made in Philly. Oh, and I sent it to Jake Wildwood to get setup and get Pegheds installed on. I felt a little sacriligious replacing the wooden pegs and while I got them working pretty well with a bit of peg dope I'm glad I had the Pegheds put on.

View attachment 143905View attachment 143906
That’s a pretty uke!
 

donboody

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Was it pretty customary to only have branding on the back of the headstock 100+ years ago?
 

Patty

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They more than hold there own.They surpass most (but certainly not all) modern sorpanos tonally. The good ones do anyway. Here's a quick sound sample I just recorded. Excuse the flubs. It's a simple piece I'm playing, but I haven't played it in a while. I don't think my playing here does the instrument justice. Perhaps I will rerecord something later.

What a sweet voice—nice playing, too.
 

CPG

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What a sweet voice—nice playing, too.
Thanks. It indeed has a lovely voice. It somehow manages to be warmer than most sopranos but still maintain a lovely jangle. I have Nyltechs on it right now which add a little chunkyness to the tone but it sounds amazing with clear flourocarbon too which give it a more open vibrant tone. It is also the lightest uke I’ve ever encountered by a couple ounces. The previous owner weighed it at 8.2oz.

(see this old thread: https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/index.php?threads/the-lightest-ukulele.134165/)

It feels like a toy when you first pick it up, but my does it sing. I don’t play it as much as some of my other ukes but it is very very special to me.
 

Joe T

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Was it pretty customary to only have branding on the back of the headstock 100+ years ago?
For Martin, yes. The earlier ones were numbered. In 1918 they began to put their C.F. Martin & Company on the back of the headstock. In 1932 they started using the decal logo on the front of the headstock.

Martin Head.jpg
 
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