Ez-Fret Guitar Attachment

ploverwing

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What the actual smurf?

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"Ez-Fret Guitar Attachment, Eliminates Finger Pain, 110 Chords Available, Fits MOST Full Sized Acoustic Guitar, L/H OK, Not A Beginner Tool, For People Whose Fingers Hurt From Guitar Strings"
 

rustydusty

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That’s really interesting 🤔I don’t have any finger pain but it would be fun to try one.
It would definitely take some getting used to…
 

TimWilson

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Maybe it's just if you strum chords in the first position?

I think so? It kinda reminds me of an autoharp -- press these keys with one hand, strum with the other.

Like, I can imagine holding it in your lap, again, like an autoharp.

Arthur Godfrey sold some of these for ukulele back in the 50s, too. I'll see if I can find some pictures. They still show up for sale pretty regularly....
 

TimWilson

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There's a long history of these with ukes. Check out the patent drawings at
('Cause of course I have this bookmarked;))

Here's a picture of one for sale now on eBay, $46.

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And an ad for the original back in 1951:

s-l400.jpg
 

baconsalad

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Unless there's some sort of mechanical advantage in the mechanism, I don't know if pushing one point with the force needed to fret 3 strings is better than splitting the work between three fingers.
 

rlgph

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Unless there's some sort of mechanical advantage in the mechanism, I don't know if pushing one point with the force needed to fret 3 strings is better than splitting the work between three fingers.
It looks to me that each button presses down on only one string. You still have to finger the chords in pretty much the same way. The advantage is that the force is spread over the entire area of the button, not just the much smaller area of the string under the finger. Do a search and look at the chord diagrams.

Perhaps you can do pretty much the same thing with thimbles?
 

Jim Yates

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I think so? It kinda reminds me of an autoharp -- press these keys with one hand, strum with the other.

Like, I can imagine holding it in your lap, again, like an autoharp.

Arthur Godfrey sold some of these for ukulele back in the 50s, too. I'll see if I can find some pictures. They still show up for sale pretty regularly....


The Autoharp - Garrison Keillor

The autoharp is an instrument on which simple harmony
Is obtained by pressing a chord bar, such as F or G,
Felt dampers thereby deaden the strings that are not needed,
And strumming it makes music, it is generally conceded.

It was invented by Charles F. Zimmerman in 1881,
An event that he compared to the rising of the sun.
“It is,” he said, “the very finest work of man on earth.”
A statement that was greeted with some mirth.

Music can be played by anyone who hears
Zimmerman believed, and so did Sears
Which sold thousands of them yonder and hither,
But still it was known as the idiot zither.

Until it was played by Pops Stoneman, a Virginian
Who did his part to change public opinion
By recording many tunes that were fancier and harder
And so did Kilby Snow and Maybelle Carter.

Many musicians otherwise liberal in their views
See an autoharp and ask to be excused.
But they’ve a surprise coming, in that city bright and fair
They’ll find no guitars, only autoharps up there.
 

Neil_O

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My father in law's brother, (uncle in law?), played cowboy chords as a pastor his whole life. This would be a target audience of this device. Those who want accompaniment to their singing, but don't really dedicate themselves to the playing.