Finding uncommon chords

JnApple

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Classic Island Tuning ( G C E A )
Fifth fret
D
Fourth fret
G#/Ab
Together.
Thanks in advance for any help.
 

Brad Bordessa

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I think you probably need to elaborate. This is very vague. The more info you can give us, the better we can help you. :shaka:
 

ukantor

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I've just played my interpretation of your chord (0045) and it sounds great - really sorta mysterious! I looked it up on "ukuchordnamer" but it doesn't recognize it as a named chord.

It's a chord, Jim, but not as we know it!

John Colter
 

merlin666

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I've just played my interpretation of your chord (0045) and it sounds great - really sorta mysterious! I looked it up on "ukuchordnamer" but it doesn't recognize it as a named chord.

It's a chord, Jim, but not as we know it!

John Colter

That can be interpreted in many ways. I offer rootless Bb13 as first choice... if there was context like other chords that get played with it or key then the choices could be more limited.
 
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Wiggy

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Plug the 4 note names in here: https://www.scales-chords.com/chordid.php

Use the last 4 blank spots like they were your 4 strings. The order, or which string you actually play them on, doesn't matter.

It will tell you all the chords that contain those notes. It also shows you incomplete chords. That can be very useful!
 

Jim Hanks

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I've just played my interpretation of your chord (0045) and it sounds great - really sorta mysterious! I looked it up on "ukuchordnamer" but it doesn't recognize it as a named chord.

GuitarToolkit suggest Abmaj7b5
This would be Ab C D G - yup, those are notes you have.
 

JnApple

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I mislabeled the notes. Fifth fret D fourth fret E. I seem to find a lot of chords not recognized. There are a lot of ones I have found on the twelfth fret that are unknown as well. Guess I will keep plugging away thanks for all the help.
 

Wiggy

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OK. We have D and E. What are the other 2 notes [strings] you are playing [open]?

<edit> ...are they G C E or A?
 
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JnApple

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That is it other strings are open. Much like the nearby Csus2 second position. What’s maddening is if you slide the E to D# it is Gsus4 which sounds awful by itself. Just the two strings are held in that chord shape other two open. Hopefully soon I can make a short video showing them in action.
 

ukantor

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Ah, my interpretation was correct then. It's a good sounding chord, on it's own. What chord sequence would you use it in?

John Colter
 

JnApple

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There is a second instance of the chord shape on the seventh fret E plus G. E open string G open string. Csus2 second position. Try a strumming pattern of 4-3-1 Ghost Cord 4-3 ending on Csus2 second position 1. Back to D on fifth fret as rhythm.
 

merlin666

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0405 is not a Csus2 because it has the 3rd (doubled, in fact) as well as the 2nd/9th, so the 2nd doesn't replace the 3rd. I would call it an incomplete Cadd9--incomplete because it's missing the 5th. A way to play it that includes the 5th would be 0435 (also 0205). Csus2 could be played 0233 (or 5233, or 5785).

Your second instance (if you mean 0707) is just a minor 3rd dyad (of E's and G's) that might be used for a rootless C triad but decidedly not for Csus2.

0405 is a straight Em7.Examples of Csus2 are 0035 or 0233.
 
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JnApple

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Third fret 0 0 G 0 fifth fret 0 0 0 D is second position Csus2 by a lot of chord guides. The phantom “ ghost chord “ is fourth fret 0 E 0 0 and fifth fret 0 0 0 D. The chord doesn’t appear on the baritone either but sounds just as cool.
 
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Jim Hanks

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This would be G E E D on a standard tuned uke
Depending on low g vs high G and maybe context, this would come off sounding like either G6 or Em7 though it is missing the B note of either.

I like to use the GuitarToolkit app on the iPad for figuring out this kind of stuff.
 

JnApple

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B44BABC8-14A6-40D9-89AA-C4FAD839C9B6.jpg seventh fret “ ghost chord “ not as powerful being up the neck as first instance on fourth fret and fifth fret. E 0 G 0.
 

Web_Parrot

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A very helpful app ( iOS for me ) is named " U-Cord " It allows you to see and hear a cord and its' various shapes by selecting the cord name OR tapping on the string/fret location, which returns the name of the cord. The upgrade option allows you to "save" cords and patterns.
 

JnApple

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I have that and the baritone one for my Flea ( gives it a haunting sound ). Have three apps, multiple books, and had some great feedback from those here that have a deep knowledge of string theory. What always annoys me about chords are the dead string ones or the pretzel fingering ones, and the cool ones like Fifth Fret D and Fourth Fret E with open strings are not found. I use one that I called the Twang Chord but it is known. Thanks. Twang Chord Gb13-5-9 Third Fret C open D#/Eb open.
 
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JnApple

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Found the Hal Leonard Ukulele Chord Finder book. It actually features 5 chords, something the u-chord doesn’t. I will keep searching on the ukulele and across the galaxy to see if the chords exist or just note it as two notes connected, to go along with any modified chords I play. Thank you each and all for the feedback.