From Uke to Guitar?

Jerryc41

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I hear about a lot of people who begin by playing the guitar and later switch to the ukulele. I've never heard of anyone who began with the uke and switched to the guitar. Is that a common switch - uke to guitar?
 

Bill Sheehan

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"Uke-to-guitar" is how I did it, Jerry. I was introduced to the ukulele back in 1965, when I was 12 years old. By the time I reached freshman year of high school, I dreamed of getting a guitar and being in a band (or "group", as we often called it back then). So, I received a used 6-string acoustic, with a Beatles songbook showing guitar chords, that Christmas. For quite a while I limited my guitar playing to just the highest 4 strings, but eventually got with the program and learned how to play it "correctly" (although I'm left-handed and have always flipped the instrument upside-down and played it without re-arranging the string sequence). Nowadays, I love playing both instruments. At first I resisted doing both because it felt so different switching between the two different sized fretboards, but now I just kind of take that in stride, and it's not the problem I feared it would be.
 

Jerryc41

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"Uke-to-guitar" is how I did it, Jerry. I was introduced to the ukulele back in 1965, when I was 12 years old. By the time I reached freshman year of high school, I dreamed of getting a guitar and being in a band (or "group", as we often called it back then). So, I received a used 6-string acoustic, with a Beatles songbook showing guitar chords, that Christmas. For quite a while I limited my guitar playing to just the highest 4 strings, but eventually got with the program and learned how to play it "correctly" (although I'm left-handed and have always flipped the instrument upside-down and played it without re-arranging the string sequence). Nowadays, I love playing both instruments. At first I resisted doing both because it felt so different switching between the two different sized fretboards, but now I just kind of take that in stride, and it's not the problem I feared it would be.

Thanks. I'm never satisfied - always wanting something else. I'll keep it in mind.
 

clear

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I kind of did that, from uke to guitar. If you go browse the guitar subforum, I think there's at least 1 thread where somebody did that by switch to progressively bigger guitars. I just went from the uke to a regular-sized guitar (Martin 000, Taylor Grand Concert) and didn't find that too difficult.
 

KohanMike

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I've mentioned this in previous threads, I went the opposite, started playing guitar in 1965 when I was 15, until July 2013 when I attended a ukulele play along at the Los Angeles Music Center. As soon as I started playing, I was hooked, never touched my 4 guitars again, gifted them to my nephew and a couple of friends. (A year later I took up the bass uke, which has become my primary instrument, with uke a close second, and harmonica taking up the rear.)

Michael Kohan in Los Angeles, Beverly Grove near the Beverly Center
4 tenor thinline cutaway ukes, 3 thinline acoustic bass ukes, 5 solid body bass ukes
•Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children in hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
•Member Cali Rose & The CC Strummers: www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/video, www.facebook.com/TheCCStrummers
 

tluxtele

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My daughter wanted to learn guitar a little over a year ago but quickly gave up because of the size. It was just uncomfortable for her. She's been playing uke for a year now. She mentioned the other day that she might want to try guitar again. I pointed out that the two hardest things about guitar is learning to make the chords and strumming. Although the chords would have different names and a few more notes... she can make the chords. And she's used to strumming. Her ears perked up. Next day she had my old electric out and taught herself a few chords. She doesn't like the pick just yet... but uke clearly has helped her with guitar. She learned a song the first day she started learning chords. Not many can say they learned a song the first day they started playing guitar.
 

merlin666

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I think that Joni Mitchell is the celebrity example. She started out on baritone uke but then became famous as proficient song writer and guitar player.
 

SurferJay

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I played Guitar (well owned a guitar) through my twenties and took it with me on my travels. I could strum a song, play chords and the odd intro if I learnt it from tab. I never really progressed past this.

Now in my fourties I hadn’t touched a guitar in 15 years until I started playing the Uke 1.5 years ago (after buying it for my daughter).

A year and a half later I’m playing scales/modes/CAGE/Improv/Looping on my Uke. I think largely due to the availability of content we have now a days..

Anyway, picked up my old guitar from storage and literally within 30 minutes I was playing solos etc on my guitar something I’ve never done ever!

In large for me it’s the same thing. The biggest difference is really at the beginning as there are some different chord shapes however the more advanced aspects of learning ie modes/cage/theory apply equally to both.

interestingly I have no interest in my guitar :)
 

Jim Yates

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Chet Atkins, George Benson, Joni Mitchell, Dick Dale and Pete Rowan all started out on the ukulele.

(Edited to add Tommy James and Jimi Hendrix)
 

jkib

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I haven't switched but added a Romero B6 tuned E-E to go along with my ukes, and I'm really enjoying it and getting into some guitar theory.