Insomnia

Nickie

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Nazis???
There is no need for you to feel guilty about anything. Nothing!
Your dreams are no weirder than mine. Last night, for example, I was playing tug of war against a wallaby, with fluorescent light bulbs that glowed different colors as we tugged. WTF?
In another dream, I drove an old pickup truck that was falling apart, couldn't decide if walking would be better.
Now, tell me that you're weirder than I.
I'm retired, don't do much of anything, and do I feel guilty? Hell to the no!
You may want to pick up a copy of A Course In Miracles and start doing a lesson every day. They're short, but pack a punch. Gets rid of guilt. I call it Buddhism in 365 days.
 

Voran

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Nazis???
There is no need for you to feel guilty about anything. Nothing!
Your dreams are no weirder than mine. Last night, for example, I was playing tug of war against a wallaby, with fluorescent light bulbs that glowed different colors as we tugged. WTF?
In another dream, I drove an old pickup truck that was falling apart, couldn't decide if walking would be better.
Now, tell me that you're weirder than I.
I'm retired, don't do much of anything, and do I feel guilty? Hell to the no!
You may want to pick up a copy of A Course In Miracles and start doing a lesson every day. They're short, but pack a punch. Gets rid of guilt. I call it Buddhism in 365 days.
Yeah...they wanted to remove my eyes, but I ran through the facility until I found a flamethrower and torched em all. Probably my fault for listening to a song about WW2 too late at night.

I can try. Why not. Thank you for the suggestion.
 

LukuleleStrings

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I have a lot of issues with sleep and have been trying to get better. Here’s what my therapist suggests:

1) Stress-dumping what’s got you worried into a journal before you go to bed so you know it’s written down somewhere to be looked at tomorrow, rather than thinking about it that night.

2) Gratitude journaling is another option where you write down the stuff you’re grateful for. It puts you in a pleasant mindset before sleep.

3) Guided meditation (there are plenty of apps that offer meditations for free or cheap).

4) Making checklists of things you need to do a few hours before you go to bed.

5) Light exercise about 4 hours before sleep.

6) No screens or TV for one hour before sleep.

7) Maintain a consistent wake and bed time.

8) Only use your bed for sleeping or sex so your brain makes pleasant associations with it.

But, if you do wake up and you feel you’ll be up for a while, get out of bed and move to the couch or someplace comfortable and do something that doesn’t take a lot of brain power and doesn’t use screens. Reading works, but not anything that gets you too stimulated.

I’m trying hard to adhere to all of this, but I wake up (a lot) stressed and feel the need to distract myself, usually by coming here. So here I am, awake in bed at 1:35, on my phone, engaged with you so I’m definitely not doing it right tonight.
 

chris667

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Yeah...they wanted to remove my eyes, but I ran through the facility until I found a flamethrower and torched em all. Probably my fault for listening to a song about WW2 too late at night.
I did Nazi that coming.

One thing I have done is stopped using mobile devices to look at the Internet. I have a clonky old desktop PC where I do all my computing. Using it means leaving the comfy chair.

I think there is nothing worse than looking at the Internet before bed for insomnia.
 

anngrante

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The lavender essential oil should help you to beat insomnia. Check out https://volant.no/ . It has been used, both internally and by olfaction, for centuries as a treatment for anxiety and depression, as well as for mood imbalances such as anxiety, insomnia, and gastrointestinal distress.
 
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John Colter

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Caffeine is a very strong, psychoactive drug and it affects some people a lot more than others. It is worth going caffeine-free for a week or so, to see if it makes much difference. But beware, suddenly stopping caffeine can make you feel really ill for a day or so. Better to taper it off. Afterwards, you should feel much better than before.

I am virtually caffeine-free, but I have a cup of tea or coffee, occasionally, if I am tired and need to improve my concentration level eg. when on a long journey.

That may sound extreme but it works for me.
 

Oldscruggsfan

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I have a lot of issues with sleep and have been trying to get better. Here’s what my therapist suggests:

1) Stress-dumping what’s got you worried into a journal before you go to bed so you know it’s written down somewhere to be looked at tomorrow, rather than thinking about it that night.

2) Gratitude journaling is another option where you write down the stuff you’re grateful for. It puts you in a pleasant mindset before sleep.

3) Guided meditation (there are plenty of apps that offer meditations for free or cheap).

4) Making checklists of things you need to do a few hours before you go to bed.

5) Light exercise about 4 hours before sleep.

6) No screens or TV for one hour before sleep.

7) Maintain a consistent wake and bed time.

8) Only use your bed for sleeping or sex so your brain makes pleasant associations with it.

But, if you do wake up and you feel you’ll be up for a while, get out of bed and move to the couch or someplace comfortable and do something that doesn’t take a lot of brain power and doesn’t use screens. Reading works, but not anything that gets you too stimulated.

I’m trying hard to adhere to all of this, but I wake up (a lot) stressed and feel the need to distract myself, usually by coming here. So here I am, awake in bed at 1:35, on my phone, engaged with you so I’m definitely not doing it right tonight.
Writing your thoughts/ worries down will get them off your mind. I’m no expert but I strongly suspect that #6 is an often overlooked root cause of insomnia. I sleep well and have always resisted having a TV in the bedroom.

In contrast, my wife often falls asleep in front of the living room TV and on those occasions will leave it on all night with the volume muted. When we travel and stay in hotels she insists on leaving the TV on all night which prevents me from dozing. Then she wonders why she doesn’t wake refreshed and why I’m an annoying “morning person”. Go figure.
 

John Colter

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We are all different. For me, cheese is a mind altering substance. If I eat cheese in the latter half of the day I am highly likely to have nightmares. I awake feeling awfully confused and doubting my sanity. Fortunately, these experiences never stay in my memory. Within ten minutes of waking up, my mind is back to normal. Or what I (perhaps mistakenly) think of as normal.
 

Joe T

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We are all different. For me, cheese is a mind altering substance. If I eat cheese in the latter half of the day I am highly likely to have nightmares. I awake feeling awfully confused and doubting my sanity. Fortunately, these experiences never stay in my memory. Within ten minutes of waking up, my mind is back to normal. Or what I (perhaps mistakenly) think of as normal.
Never heard of that one John. Have you ever researched what about the cheese causes the disturbance of sleep?
 

John Colter

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Never heard of that one John. Have you ever researched what about the cheese causes the disturbance of sleep?
I've not done any actual research but I have looked on the internet. I didn't find any reference to cheese causing bad dreams, but there is a lot of chatter about cheese being addictive, or not, depending on whom you believe. My findings, therefore, are the result of only one case study.

It could simply be auto suggestion. I wish I'd never thought of it. I really like cheese!
 

Joe T

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I've not done any actual research but I have looked on the internet. I didn't find any reference to cheese causing bad dreams, but there is a lot of chatter about cheese being addictive, or not, depending on whom you believe. My findings, therefore, are the result of only one case study.

It could simply be auto suggestion. I wish I'd never thought of it. I really like cheese!
Thanks for the input. Might just be heavy on the digestion. I can concur that it is addictive, I love cheese too. The stronger and sharper the better. Although I haven't had it in years, I loved that processed Velvetta on a grilled cheese sandwich too. I don't think that's even real cheese. 😁