Learn baritone ukulele classical fingerstyle playing in a systematic way

ro_sims

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Hi, i want to learn classical fingerstyle playing on my baritone ukulele. I want to learn it in a systematical way
Strumming chords, and singing is not a problem. What knowledge do i need?, Where do i begin. If you have pdf books or information you like to share please let me know. Many thanks in advance
 

ripock

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Are you saying you want to play classical guitar without the low E and A strings? Assuming that's so, if I were in your shoes and I wanted to learn classical or flamenco guitar, I would find a teacher. It would save so much time to get instruction and I find the pressure not to let another person down is very motivating.
 

ro_sims

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Are you saying you want to play classical guitar without the low E and A strings? Assuming that's so, if I were in your shoes and I wanted to learn classical or flamenco guitar, I would find a teacher. It would save so much time to get instruction and I find the pressure not to let another person down is very motivating.

Very nice to look at it that way. Yes, in fact it is playing classical guitar without the low E and A string. I have a baritone ukulele tuned DGBE. Had a classical guitar but sold it because i found it way too big. But anyway i'll look for a guitar teacher who wants to teach me classical style music on my ukulele, but in the meantime if someone has information on pdf to start with and they want to share it, i'll be glad
 

Futurethink

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Hi, i want to learn classical fingerstyle playing on my baritone ukulele. I want to learn it in a systematical way
Strumming chords, and singing is not a problem. What knowledge do i need?, Where do i begin. If you have pdf books or information you like to share please let me know. Many thanks in advance

Just a question; have you considered a smaller guitar? The Cordoba Mini II has a nut width that is just under two inches wide, so it's probably similar to your classical guitar. The neck is shorter, however, and the Cordoba Mini (1) is shorter yet, like your baritone. It might be easier to find instructional materials. https://www.elderly.com/products/cordoba-mini-ii-padauk-travel-guitar?variant=39878466535615

Here is a book I found for learning classical music on the baritone ukulele: https://www.amazon.com/Graded-Classical-Repertoire-Ukulele-Baritone/dp/B09NHN19V7/ref=sr_1_11?crid=3HFRIMOYQMGCZ&keywords=classical+baritone+ukulele+book&qid=1649431978&s=books&sprefix=classical+bariton,stripbooks,93&sr=1-11
It might be what you're looking for.

There are lots of PDF for individual songs (Fur Elise, Canon in D, Hall of the Mountain King, etc.). Some are tabbed for baritone, and many are tabbed for tenor. As long as the tab is written for low-G or low-D they will work the same on either baritone of tenor--you'll just be playing in a different key. Not a problem for solo playing.
 

ro_sims

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Just a question; have you considered a smaller guitar? The Cordoba Mini II has a nut width that is just under two inches wide, so it's probably similar to your classical guitar. The neck is shorter, however, and the Cordoba Mini (1) is shorter yet, like your baritone. It might be easier to find instructional materials. https://www.elderly.com/products/cordoba-mini-ii-padauk-travel-guitar?variant=39878466535615

Here is a book I found for learning classical music on the baritone ukulele: https://www.amazon.com/Graded-Classical-Repertoire-Ukulele-Baritone/dp/B09NHN19V7/ref=sr_1_11?crid=3HFRIMOYQMGCZ&keywords=classical+baritone+ukulele+book&qid=1649431978&s=books&sprefix=classical+bariton,stripbooks,93&sr=1-11
It might be what you're looking for.

There are lots of PDF for individual songs (Fur Elise, Canon in D, Hall of the Mountain King, etc.). Some are tabbed for baritone, and many are tabbed for tenor. As long as the tab is written for low-G or low-D they will work the same on either baritone of tenor--you'll just be playing in a different key. Not a problem for solo playing.
No i don't want a six string guitar. Playing a four string instrument is easier. I'm going to order the book from amazon, Many thanks,
 

Diedra

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I have the graded repetoire book for baritone and can confirm it is really great!
I'm very much in the same boat as you with this journey. I'd also suggest having a look at classical guitar warm up routines on youtube and just adjusting it to four strings. Its mostly just training your fingers to find the right strings as you play 🙂
 

ro_sims

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I have the graded repetoire book for baritone and can confirm it is really great!
I'm very much in the same boat as you with this journey. I'd also suggest having a look at classical guitar warm up routines on youtube and just adjusting it to four strings. Its mostly just training your fingers to find the right strings as you play 🙂
Thank you
 

Diedra

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I feel I need this too but this is also by the same team as the graded repetoire book and should go hand in hand with the grades.
It's for standard ukulele and I think the only reason I haven't taken the plunge is that I'd like to double check with them that it would translate well for bari...like it should, I think, as their ukulele stuff is for low G .
 

merlin666

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No i don't want a six string guitar. Playing a four string instrument is easier. I'm going to order the book from amazon, Many thanks,
I think you got that totally wrong. On a guitar with six strings you can cover two octaves in one position. On a baritone uke to go from lowest note D to D two octaves higher you will have to move to the 10th fret on E string. So even the most elementary classical guitar piece where you would only have to lift a few fingers might turn into a challenging exercise on ukulele. Playing pieces that are dumbed down (simplified) from guitar to baritone is not easier but cutting corners. You are cheating yourself if playing that stuff is your goal.
 

kypfer

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ro_sims

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I think you got that totally wrong. On a guitar with six strings you can cover two octaves in one position. On a baritone uke to go from lowest note D to D two octaves higher you will have to move to the 10th fret on E string. So even the most elementary classical guitar piece where you would only have to lift a few fingers might turn into a challenging exercise on ukulele. Playing pieces that are dumbed down (simplified) from guitar to baritone is not easier but cutting corners. You are cheating yourself if playing that stuff is your goal.
Well you've made a point, but still i'm going to stick with my baritone ukulele. It's so portable
 

ro_sims

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Its hard to work out what you want to do.

Classical music usually comes in Standard Notation and you read the music and play it. If the sheet music was arranged for another instrument, you edit and arrange it so you can play it on a Baritone ukulele. So if you learn how to sight read well, finding classical music to play is not very hard.

There are also some exercises to help you develop your playing skills so you can find the notes to play. But they are just fingerpicking exercises and arpeggios in reality.

This is my suggestion.

If you have the money, park the classical music terminology, but don't forget about it. Find a (classical?) guitar teacher and ask to get lessons in sight reading standard notation using your baritone ukulele, up to four notes on a beat. Also discuss that once you have developed the skill and knowledge, you want to apply the skill and knowledge to focus on the classical genre or works by your favourite classical composer if you have one. Pay the teacher and do the work.

If you can't afford a teacher, look for content which is about learning to sight read standard notation instead of a "Classical Method for Baritone Ukulele". Learn how to sight read and write in standard notation, use whatever tunes are in the content. Then you can find most classical music from the sheet music and play it, maybe with some editing and arranging.
Many thanks for the valuable information. Yes, my goal is to sight read and play. I can afford a teacher so i'll look for one. Many thanks again
 

henrymosley

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I just have a feeling that this classic style won't work for me. It's like my fingers don't listen to me. It makes me feel terrible.
Perhaps I should try to use the omegle video chat to become more confident.
 
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ro_sims

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I just have a feeling that this classic style won't work for me. It's like my fingers don't listen to me. It makes me feel terrible.
The fingers don't listen at first. It's the same with everyone. Start practicing slowly and then you will see the results
 

Edspyhill05

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No i don't want a six string guitar. Playing a four string instrument is easier. I'm going to order the book from amazon, Many thanks,
I studied classical guitar for about 7 years. I loved it but the student is drawn into that world of perfection. Nothing but perfection is good enough. You have to have thick skin. I do miss being in the local classical guitar orchestra playing guitar IV parts. The E and A Strings were absolutely necessary.

Now my mantra is four strings are enough. Although I'd love to create a 5-string baritone tuning of A D G B E, and have that low A String. You mentioned also about the size of the baritone uke and I agree. I had so many RSI problems with my full size CG. The guitar never felt secure no matter what I used to stabilize it while playing. I nearly destroyed my left elbow. What worked was using a guitar strap, but I was somewhat vilified for such a cardinal sin. ;-)