Learning notes : the right place

playfalse

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jglover

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Yes, but in the key of F, the Do = F...................

Why not just learn the notes themselves and how to read them on the staff?
 

playfalse

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Yes, but in the key of F, the Do = F...................

Why not just learn the notes themselves and how to read them on the staff?

I am not sure were are talking about the same thing :

my topic is notes, your is chord. But I am only a beginner and I post this thread because :

1.having read all that :

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/f...-is-the-BEST-Place-to-Start-My-Learning-Focus


"For a truly new beginner, if you had to do it over again, where and what would you focus your energy on?

I want to make the most out of my practice sessions as a noob and would really appreciate your input.
Learn the names and locations of all notes on the fingerboard.

Learn the names and locations of all basic chords (major, minor, 7th).

Learn your major scales (minor scales use the same shapes, just different names).

Learn the key signatures and how related chords and scales work together.

Practice with a metronome or drum machine to keep your timing in check. Timing is the number one weak point I see in most musicians (myself included).

Jam along with your favorite songs and figure them out as you go (chords, key, melody, riffs). A musically diverse ipod on master shuffle will whip your ears into shape pretty darn quick.

Those are the bottom line basics. They can always be improved upon, no matter who you are. 99% of the music you will ever play uses all of the basics. The materials can all be found via google. How you go about internalizing the information is the more subjective and challenging part. "


2. Till now I have not seen anything else as these 65 videos (free) allowing to learn short songs and NOTES on the fretboard.

So again have a look here :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJu3boJCI64 and 64 more.

Don't forget : to stick at that you only have to know :
NOTES : C=Do // D=Ré // E=mi // F=Fa // G=sol // A=La // B= Si
 
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Louis0815

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Would have been cool somehow to reply in the original thread instead of starting a new one - could a mod pls merge things together?

BTT: Do is always C, Do can never ever be F.
Do, Re, Mi etc are just italian names of the notes commonly known as C, D, E etc.

Knowing
(a) to which note each string is tuned and
(b) that every fret means one halftone up or down and
(c) that one octave contains 12 halftone steps
it is fairly easy to find any single note anywhere on the fretboard. Sure, it does take some time and fret counting in the beginning, but it is not rocket science. And this is not connected to any major or minor scales at first, scales are a different topic.

Google for "fretboard maps" or "fretboard roadmaps" to find some diagrams.....

edit:
 
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grendel1972

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BTT: Do is always C, Do can never ever be F.
Do, Re, Mi etc are just italian names of the notes commonly known as C, D, E etc.

It actually depends on whether you are using fixed do solfege or movable do solfege as to whether this is true. For the true beginner, and I would posit for almost all uke players, movable do solfege is preferable. In that method, Do does not always equal C, it only equals C if you are in the key of C. The do-re-mi... scale that we all know is simply the notes in a major scale. If you're starting on F and are going up a major scale, then do=F, etc, etc. Same if you're in A major, do=A. I think movable do solfege is more natural and helpful for beginners. If you use fixed do solfege, where do always equals C, then when you're in F major, for example, the major scale is Fa-Sol-La-Ti-Do-Re-Mi-Do. I'm sure that looks whacky, but that's the major scale, in F, if you're using fixed do. What that doesn't tell you is that the Ti, while a B, is a B-flat (because you're in F major, which has a B-flat in the major scale).

I think it's much more intuitive for a beginner to think of Do as the root note, so that any major scale starts on Do, no matter if that is C, F, A, G, whatever. The use of fixed do solfege is more helpful when you get into extremely complex music where it is difficult to determine what the root is, or it's changing so much as to make it impossible to keep moving your movable do. I don't think that really applies to 99% of what people are doing on the uke.

Hopefully I haven't thoroughly confused everyone. :p
 
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playfalse

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It actually depends on whether you are using fixed do solfege or movable do solfege as to whether this is true. For the true beginner, and I would posit for almost all uke players, movable do solfege is preferable. In that method, Do does not always equal C, it only equals C if you are in the key of C. The do-re-mi... scale that we all know is simply the notes in a major scale. If you're starting on F and are going up a major scale, then do=F, etc, etc. Same if you're in A major, do=A. I think movable do solfege is more natural and helpful for beginners. If you use fixed do solfege, where do always equals C, then when you're in F major, for example, the major scale is Fa-Sol-La-Ti-Do-Re-Mi-Do. I'm sure that looks whacky, but that's the major scale, in F, if you're using fixed do. What that doesn't tell you is that the Ti, while a B, is a B-flat (because you're in F major, which has a B-flat in the major scale).

I think it's much more intuitive for a beginner to think of Do as the root note, so that any major scale starts on Do, no matter if that is C, F, A, G, whatever. The use of fixed do solfege is more helpful when you get into extremely complex music where it is difficult to determine what the root is, or it's changing so much as to make it impossible to keep moving your movable do. I don't think that really applies to 99% of what people are doing on the uke.

Hopefully I haven't thoroughly confused everyone. :p

Thanks for having answered I think I have understood what you have said :
It 's a matter of intervals and you only have to count intervals WWHWWWH (W =whole and H=half) from the first note of the scale .(in movable do solfege)

I hope I'm not wrong .

In conclusion, I would say the tittle of my topic should have been

Learning songs step by step: the right place

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWcQVV07aQI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJu3boJCI64

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4ac7NqY-04

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FF_2oRprIcw

Test it
 

jglover

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I think it's much more intuitive for a beginner to think of Do as the root note, so that any major scale starts on Do, no matter if that is C, F, A, G, whatever. The use of fixed do solfege is more helpful when you get into extremely complex music where it is difficult to determine what the root is, or it's changing so much as to make it impossible to keep moving your movable do. I don't think that really applies to 99% of what people are doing on the uke.

Hopefully I haven't thoroughly confused everyone. :p

This makes sense, to think of Do as the root of the scale. Personally for me though, I've never thought in terms of the Do-Re-Me scales as to me that is just too random. Those seven tones are just the notes of a major scale and I've always found it easier to actually learn how to selects the scale notes based upon the key signature, or to figure out the applicable notes and/or chords based upon the progressions present (ie I-IV-V7, etc.) in simpler tunes. I've always thought do was a deer, a female deer.......I pretty much associated doremifasolatido with Julie Andrews! :)
 

Louis0815

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Personally for me though, I've never thought in terms of the Do-Re-Me scales as to me that is just too random. Those seven tones are just the notes of a major scale and I've always found it easier to actually learn how to selects the scale notes based upon the key signature, or to figure out the applicable notes and/or chords based upon the progressions present (ie I-IV-V7, etc.) in simpler tunes.
:agree:
If I had a choice I would rather use the progression numbers than the "names" - this helps to avoid utter confusion in communication with other musicians.... ("No, I meant that Do at 3rd fret 2nd string - dunno why it doesn't sound like yours"
smiley_emoticons_confused.gif
)
 

grendel1972

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:agree:
If I had a choice I would rather use the progression numbers than the "names" - this helps to avoid utter confusion in communication with other musicians.... ("No, I meant that Do at 3rd fret 2nd string - dunno why it doesn't sound like yours"
smiley_emoticons_confused.gif
)

I agree with you as well, I always think of the progression numbers, not the solfege names. When I was in music school long ago, we had to learn solfege in our sight singing lessons. You tended to develop a kind of "muscle memory" for lack of a better term so that no matter what key you were in, you could sing, for example, Do-La-Sol and it just felt right. And then with movable do, you also have inflections, so a minor scale is do-re-me, fa, sol, le, ti, do. That augmented second between the flat six and the leading tone seven, still to this day if I think of it as le-ti, it's right there for me. All this is to say that solfege can be a really great teaching tool, but you will ultimately need to know the notes and the progression numbers.
 

robin jack

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