Martin Beck Handmade Tenor - REVIEW

Dohle

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 23, 2019
Messages
1,182
Points
63
Those sneak peek photos last week were mouth-watering. I had no clue it was a Martin Beck. I've seen these pop up in World of Ukes but had no idea about the quality. I was surprised how good a score it got but I definitely get why. It takes some effort to make a plain looking spruce top look that gorgeous.

Thank god I just commissioned a new custom from another luthier. Otherwise I might've been very tempted. :D
 

Nickie

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
9,837
Points
63
I've already received a reply from him....so he is attentive.
 

Veritas99

UU VIP
UU VIP
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
121
Points
28
I've already received a reply from him....so he is attentive.
Nothing for me yet. Wonder if he got hit with a lot of inquiries.

EDIT: Of course, I get a response right after I posted this. Will leave my original post up as a testament to my impatience, but folks should know he is very responsive.
 
Last edited:

Nickie

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
9,837
Points
63
I replied to his reply, asking some questions. He didn't know about through the bridge stringing (I don't like pin bridges), so I sent him some pictures. I told him that's what I want, if he's going to build me an ukulele.
 

donboody

Active member
Joined
Mar 16, 2021
Messages
345
Points
43
I replied to his reply, asking some questions. He didn't know about through the bridge stringing (I don't like pin bridges), so I sent him some pictures. I told him that's what I want, if he's going to build me an ukulele.
I'm a tie bar guy myself. I've have a uke with a slotted bridge too. Havent used a pin since my acoustic guitar days. Is this all personal preference, or what? Is there an advantage to the bridge types, sound wise? Somebody probably thinks so. Maybe they're right! I like tie bar solely because I can quickly and easily string the uke up as Ive memorized the knot. Theres no other reason I prefer it. I prefer the tie bar to the slotted because when I change strings on my slotted bridge uke I have to look the knot up to tie it right (Ashley stopper is what I use). I'd be more apt to believe a specific bridge strategy lends itself to a longer string lifetime than it does to improved tone, but all i know about ukes ive read on this board so idk really.
 

bazmaz

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 5, 2009
Messages
5,159
Points
48
I'm a tie bar guy myself. I've have a uke with a slotted bridge too. Havent used a pin since my acoustic guitar days. Is this all personal preference, or what? Is there an advantage to the bridge types, sound wise? Somebody probably thinks so. Maybe they're right! I like tie bar solely because I can quickly and easily string the uke up as Ive memorized the knot. Theres no other reason I prefer it. I prefer the tie bar to the slotted because when I change strings on my slotted bridge uke I have to look the knot up to tie it right (Ashley stopper is what I use). I'd be more apt to believe a specific bridge strategy lends itself to a longer string lifetime than it does to improved tone, but all i know about ukes ive read on this board so idk really.
For me it depends on the uke. On smaller bodied ukes I like a slot style as they don't take up too much real estate. Don't think they need any particular type of knot (or at least i've never used one in 20 years! I just tie either a single knot on the fatter strings or a double on the thinner - just enough to avoid it slipping through).

I like pin bridges, partly because I kind of view them as the same as slot bridges (they effectively are, just with a pin to hold the knotted end down instead of a slot) and find them just as easy to change. Maybe that's because I also play guitar and all my instruments have them.

The through bridge puts a lot of people off who thing the change is difficult - it's really not and less work than a tie bar. The advantage is supposedly more downward tension in to the saddle due to the more severe break angle. I'd say, no better than a pin bridge for that, but more angle than a slot or tie bar.

Tie bar I like for the look to be honest - very traditional.
 

Nickie

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
9,837
Points
63
Through the body and slotted bridges are the fastest, and simplest to restring. The big advantage of through the body (TTB) stringing is that it doesn't pull the bridge away from the body. It actually forces the bridge down on the body. The disadvantage is, if it's placed wrong, it can't be moved like the other bridges.
I've had a tie bridge come loose and split my top, I'll never buy another one.
 

bazmaz

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 5, 2009
Messages
5,159
Points
48
Through the body and slotted bridges are the fastest, and simplest to restring. The big advantage of through the body (TTB) stringing is that it doesn't pull the bridge away from the body. It actually forces the bridge down on the body. The disadvantage is, if it's placed wrong, it can't be moved like the other bridges.
I've had a tie bridge come loose and split my top, I'll never buy another one.
Slot style is faster than through bridge - literally just hooking a knot in a slot?