Moore Bettah scratch repair

Brockketcher

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
63
Points
18
Has anyone had any luck with repair of minor but visible scratches on a Moore Bettah. The scratches appear to be from string changes in the head stock. Nothing deep, but definitely visible and annoying. Probably best left to a professional perhaps, but even then, what professional would you know to trust? Or maybe someone has had luck doing it themselves with one of these products you see online. Seem a bit too good to be true tho. Any help?
 

Attachments

  • 1CF68110-C864-45AE-81F7-1226673E6895.jpeg
    1CF68110-C864-45AE-81F7-1226673E6895.jpeg
    317.8 KB · Views: 63

anthonyg

Active member
Joined
Oct 13, 2012
Messages
2,127
Points
38
There are probably a few options yet you could always send Chuck a personal message here on Ukulele Underground. He visits the builders forum reasonably regularly.
 
Last edited:

pmorey

UU VIP
UU VIP
Joined
Jul 15, 2013
Messages
127
Points
18
I believe Chuck has recommend Virtuoso Polish in the past for scratches. I have had success with it in the past for scratches as you describe on the head stock.
 

saltytri

Active member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
1,825
Points
38
By all means, see if Chuck can be helpful. Attempts to fix even minor cosmetic issues can make matters much worse rather than better unless done by an experienced person who is familiar with repairs and with the particular methods and materials that were used to put the finish on in the first place. There are plenty of times when the best decision is to leave things as they are as evidence that an instrument has been well used for its primary purpose of making music.
 

pmorey

UU VIP
UU VIP
Joined
Jul 15, 2013
Messages
127
Points
18
And let me circle back here to be clear! I got very good results… on a gloss Pono. IF I ever found myself lucky enough to have a Moore Bettah, there is absolutely zero chance I would trust doing any type of repair myself!
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Messages
293
Points
18
$0..2 advice. Chuck is your best bet before applying any polish or finish. You need to know what finish has been used on the headstock. The wrong polish could destroy a French polish, and an oil finish could damage poly or shellac. Unless you know what you're dealing with, enjoy the sound and don't look down !!! (Personally, I'd just call Chuck Moore, give him the build number and I'm sure he'll respond right away.)
 

Brockketcher

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
63
Points
18
That was good advise given by a couple smart people on the thread - so I took it. I was a bit hesitant because I didn’t want to bug him, but you are right - He responded right away and gave me his advise. I’m sure he doesn’t mind helping goofballs like me, but at the same time I want to respect his time. Anyways, it all worked out. Trying to take good care of his beautiful ukulele without being annoying is a fine line I think!
 

Brockketcher

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
63
Points
18
Hi Bill,
Many makers prefer to have happy customers who own a nice looking uke, than the reverse. Unhappy customers with a bad looking uke can cost a making business a lot of time and money and new customers. So as long as you are polite and patient (makers are often very busy) you are actually doing them a favour by asking them about issues with the finish or other aspects of a ukulele which they made.

You are doing them much less of a favour by posting photographs and discussing "issues" on social media where their competitors and negative audience can take the opportunity to make disparaging remarks which lead to loss of potential orders and a damaged reputation.

So if you want to look after the maker of your custom uke, within reason, take opportunities to set up a dialogue. Ask them some questions if you need advice on the ukulele that they made. If you have a major problem that needs a repair, give them the opportunity to quote or comment before asking anyone else. If you have a minor issue, ask for advice. And be patient while you wait for reply.

If you like the service, send them a post or testimony to post on their own site so they can have control of how it is used for promotion, rather than blasting it all over social media where you have no control of how it is used or abused.
Hi Bill, a “light” scratch repair is a self inflicted wound. Nothing to do with the craftsmanship of the instrument. I’m quite sure no builder would find offense to asking such a simple question. I’m sorry it upset you. This actually has been a really helpful thread for me. Let’s be friends. ;-)
 

Patrick Madsen

UU VIP
UU VIP
Joined
Oct 29, 2011
Messages
2,504
Points
38
So, what does Chuck use to final polish the small scratches. Last I heard he used Virtuoso. Is he still using it. I have a MB (Two Feathers in Stacies first MB book) about 8 years old.
 

Brockketcher

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
63
Points
18
He told me that product was good and I should use it with an old cotton T-shirt. To be fair he also said my scratches where very light. Love your ukulele!. Wondered who owned that. If it’s ever for sale, email me! 😁
 

Brockketcher

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
63
Points
18
Always ask the maker even if you are not the original owner. They know best.
Thank you Pete. You nailed my concern. Since I wasn’t the original owner, I was a bit hesitant about reaching out to the builder. But you were right, that was the right move. He was super helpful.
 

Brockketcher

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
63
Points
18
I believe Chuck has recommend Virtuoso Polish in the past for scratches. I have had success with it in the past for scratches as you describe on the head stock.
Update. I took your advise and used this. Is great. Took out most the scratch. Great product.
 

Attachments

  • 60D93C9B-79C6-4ED5-AF6A-9260278B4C1D.jpeg
    60D93C9B-79C6-4ED5-AF6A-9260278B4C1D.jpeg
    56.9 KB · Views: 16

Doc_J

Active member
Joined
Aug 16, 2009
Messages
4,657
Points
38
Virtuoso does pretty well.
I've had success with scratch removal on a glossy uke or two by using Meguiar's® Scratch-X and old flannel cloth.
Test before you commit. YMMV.