my ukulele progress

Tin Ear

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Right now I have my shepherd's pie in the oven. I used spinach and corn as the vegetables which aren't very traditional but it was what I had. I got fancy and put a design in the potatoes with a spoon. If I were a 14 year old girl I'd take a picture of it and publish it on my social media.
(y) Ha Ha on the social media
 
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ripock

ripock

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I don't even know how to talk about these scales. I wonder if the Kumoi and Hirayoshi are actual Japanese scales that have been borrowed wholesale or are they merely scales that are evocative of the far east in a general way and are therefore given Japanese names...kind of like some of the incidental music from Breakfast at Tiffany's or like John Wayne playing Genghis Khan after some mascara is applied. I suppose it is best to ignore the whole issue of provenance altogether.

The first thing you'll notice with the kumoi is the airiness of the scale. There are intervals so large that you could drive a truck through them. I am of course speaking primarily of the 3 frets jump between the flat 3 and the 5. Then there is another daredevil jump between the flat 6 and 1 (in the Hirayoshi) and a slightly less daunting 2 fret jump in the Kumoi.

There are definitely different ways to look at it. You can either maintain your original hand position and curse the large intervals or you can move your position and have a lot of notes around your former position and a lot of notes in the latter. I have done both for different reasons and contexts.
 
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ripock

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prices are really fluctuating out there. Leeks dropped $2 however I had to go to a tobacconist because of the weather. I had ordered some tobacco but it was delayed because of reasons I only know too intimately. When I was in logistics I knew about the fragile circumstances around Memphis Tennessee. When Memphis gets ice the entire world gets put on pause. I remember working at Fedex and when Memphis gets ice it scrrews up everything. I remember being so cold standing in front of an open bay using non-automated conveyor belts from the 70's because Memphis was iced over and I was moving merchandise to try to alleviate the weather-impacting supply chain issues. So my ordered tobacco was stuck in transit because of memphis, so I had to go buy a tin of tobacco to tide me over. And the tin was over $20! I remember it being a lot, lot less!

I also received an email from a merchant advertising an Irish sweater. The email said that an Irish sweater (which I believe is called a jumper in Ireland) is akin to receiving a hug. That made me think of our friend Voran's music which I have actually purchased. Therefore I know Voran's Irish music and I don't think I would typify it as a warm hug.
 

Renaissance-Man

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I also received an email from a merchant advertising an Irish sweater. The email said that an Irish sweater (which I believe is called a jumper in Ireland) is akin to receiving a hug. That made me think of our friend Voran's music which I have actually purchased. Therefore I know Voran's Irish music and I don't think I would typify it as a warm hug.
Voran is Irish, yes. I'm not sure she's attempting to create traditional Irish music though. Ironically, traditional Irish music is not all warm and fuzzy. Voran is authentic, and that's what I like about her.
 

ploverwing

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The email said that an Irish sweater (which I believe is called a jumper in Ireland) is akin to receiving a hug.
Well... Only if it was hand made. I knit, so my sweaters are hugs from me to the people I knit them for, but I seriously doubt that's true of a commercially produced sweater.
 

Bill Sheehan

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Voran is Irish, yes. I'm not sure she's attempting to create traditional Irish music though. Ironically, traditional Irish music is not all warm and fuzzy. Voran is authentic, and that's what I like about her.
I'll second that, Renaissance-Man!
 

bbkobabe

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The real deal Irish fisherman's sweater, the ganse, was originally knitted using old bicycle spokes for that ultra thick fiber density... Warm in any weather.
 
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ripock

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More as a mental exercise than anything else I have been playing chords with 100% diatonic notes. They of course always sound appropriate but they lack the give-and-take dynamic.

So I continued playing my E Kumoi (E F# G B C#) but I backed it with a progression that was very Dorian: F#m7, BΔ7, C#m11 or m9 depending on the moment.
 
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ripock

ripock

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Aww hello there :D thank you for the kind words.

I do have some influences from traditional Irish music, yes. But I don't intentionally try and write in any one genre. I just write/sing whatever comes into my head.
does it bug you that the term Irish music exists and that it precludes what you're doing although you're as Irish as the Sidhe or the hills? I ask because I hate the term American cheese which is crappy flavorless cheese. It is embarrassing to say the least.

similarly I dislike "ukulele music" because the term is so constrictive and describes a music which I don't play and which I don't like...but I am not going to expand on that because I know a lot of my friends around here do like the music
 
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Voran

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does it bug you that the term Irish music exists and that it precludes what you're doing although you're as Irish as the Sidhe or the hills? I ask because I hate the term American cheese which is crappy flavorless cheese. It is embarrassing to say the least.
Not really. I'm not purely Irish genetically either. I'm made up of God knows what random racial soup including Middle Eastern if you go back far enough.
 
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ripock

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I had a pleasant surprise. My serrated knife can cut through aged cheese. My standard chef knife is razor sharp. I know because I sharpened it myself. However it will crumble aged cheese as it pushes through. The serrated knife, with its teeth, actually sliced some pecorino today so that I actually had little slices.

I watched an interesting video today about playing jazz whose premise was to make mistakes. Jazz is a system of making and recovering from mistakes. I understand and agree with that, but what's missing is the obverse of that coin. You have to position yourself to make mistakes and make amends, and that can only be done with study and practice. If you're untutored and making mistakes, it is going to sound like crap. You have to have a generalized sense of competency so that you can play an unplanned note but then bring it back into the alignment. That's what I try to do: spend some time being anal and robotic and then interlard that with periods of looseness. And all the time, there is meter. It has to be done in time. That's why I often play with my metronome. Something like the Kumoi scale only has five diatonic notes. And they sound good as long as you stay in time. And the other 7 chromatic notes work as well...as long as you can insert them into the scheme and return to the framework in a timely fashion.

So, yes, it does pay dividends to make mistakes but only after you've paved the way with practice.
 
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ripock

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I've been a busy at work lately but I had some time to make more progress on the book, Arion's Lyre, which landed me in hot water earlier because the book examines the connection between Archaic Greece and Hellenistic Egypt. I had noticed that when a later time period invokes a former, there is a problematic relationship. And I had the temerity to mention that. However the less said about that the better!

I was thinking of how creations in the kitchen are connected to creations at the music stand. I wish I could say that I had planned that connection out when I started this thread. But it was just serendipity. I talked about my music. I talked about my food. And it just worked out.

Along those lines I was thinking about what I had posted in the previous entry and about the culinary concept of the gastrique. Gastrique is just carmelized sugar deglazed with vinegar or some other acid. The acid tames the sweet and makes it less cloying and the sweet makes the acid tolerably sour. That applies to what I was talking about yesterday because too many diatonic notes make it bland but too many chromatic notes are anarchic. A mixture is preferable.

I was trying to practice that today. I have to admit I find it very difficult. I was playing "geometrically" which is what I call it when I don't think about the intervals of the notes and play things together because of where they are on the fretboard. I was focusing on notes that are adjacent and notes that are separated by a fret. That seems to make good music...or at least that's a good building block.

I am playing the Kumoi scale and there is a rather large interval between the bIII and the V. So that was the perfect opportunity to play the three frets between those two intervals. It was a safe way to practice "making mistakes" like I referenced in my last entry. I would pursue a melody and when I would get to the bIII, then I could pick any or all of the intervening degrees and step outside of the scale and then return once I got to the 5th interval.

Once I get comfortable being a little loose, then I will see if I can take it further. But that's another day.
 

ploverwing

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So, yes, it does pay dividends to make mistakes but only after you've paved the way with practice.
There's a lot of conversation around this with respect to art: does throwing paint at a canvas represent the same skill level of artistry as meticulously recreating every detail in hyper realism? Well, if you've gone through the process of mastering your materials and tools, such that you can meticulously recreate detail in hyper realism, and choose to throw paint at a canvas instead, then, yes. Not if you just start off with throwing paint at canvas, not understanding the underlying limitations of your tools and materials. Although, I know others will disagree with this.

I agree with you - you need to understand that when you are playing a note "out of order", it's as good as intentional: you know that you're doing it, and you're doing it because you have the skills required to achieve successful tone, volume, clarity etc. and yet you're choosing to do something different in that space. Jazz is the equivalent of throwing paint at a canvas with the skills foundation to make that intentional decision, that choice of expression.
 
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Renaissance-Man

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There's a lot of conversation around this with respect to art: does throwing paint at a canvas represent the same skill level of artistry as meticulously recreating every detail in hyper realism? Well, if you've gone through the process of mastering your materials and tools, such that you can meticulously recreate detail in hyper realism, and choose to throw paint at a canvas instead, then, yes. Not if you just start off with throwing paint at canvas, not understanding the underlying limitations of your tools and materials.
If you don't mind, I'd like to keep a copy of your thoughts quoted above for reference. I have a collection of quotations and stories of past persons, places, and things that I reflect on to understand life. I'm not explaining myself clearly at the moment, but your thoughts are a metaphor that touches a part of me.

In return, I'll leave you with this quote I keep with me, from someone everyone will recognize.
"This is what I give. I give an expression of care every day to each child, to help him realize that he is unique. I end the program by saying, 'You've made this day a special day, by just your being you. There's no person in the whole world like you; and I like you just the way you are.'"
 
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ripock

ripock

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I feel uncomfortable when anyone tries to explain jazz. If it has to be explained to you then you just don't get it.

---or so I've been told. :unsure:
Luckily I am not playing jazz. I play Roots music which takes its rudiments from jazz and blues but it is its own thing. I don't think I could be a jazzman. First of all because of the talent involved but also because a great portion of jazz revolves around playing standards and I have absolutely no interest in playing anything that doesn't emanate from my head.
 
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ripock

ripock

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Chords are all around. I don't know about you but I see chords in everyday objects like stains on walls or patterns of lights on a semi-truck trailer.

Today I saw an apartment building with the address 1305 and I thought I wonder what that chord is. I played it and it is very sweet. Let me amend that: 1305 was a bit of a stretch, literally, so I played the open chord 13 15 0 17. And that's what, a EΔ7 add b14?

And that apartment was one of four. The addresses were 1305, 1307, 1309, 1311. those addresses end in 5, 7, 9, 11. You could use those scale degrees to make a dom11 chord (as long as you assume the 7 is a b7). However in theory I think I would always prefer 3 (to differentiate major and minor), b7, 9. 11. And in practice I always play 1, 3, b7, 11 because playing the 9 is very stretchy and the 1 is always 2 frets closer than the 9.
 
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ripock

ripock

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by the way, the chord I saw in a stain on a wall was arguably the best chord shape in the universe. It is, for example, 4434. If you assume the root is on the G string, then it is a 9 chord. If the root is on the C string, then it is a m6 chord. If the root is on the A string, it is a ø.