Neck carving

sequoia

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Pretty slick I must admit... Do you finish off the heal volute by hand with a chisel and knife or?
 

Timbuck

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Pretty slick I must admit... Do you finish off the heal volute by hand with a chisel and knife or?
I use rasp and file and hand sanding for that bit after I complete the headstock rear.
 

mikeyb2

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Ok Ken, you've got me going. I'm intrigued as to what that steel object is in the second photo. It's the one directly in front of the neck heel of the lower neck in the photo. What is it and what is it's purpose? Looks like some sort of counter balance, but I can't see it in the other pictures.
Cheers Mike
 

Timbuck

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Ok Ken, you've got me going. I'm intrigued as to what that steel object is in the second photo. It's the one directly in front of the neck heel of the lower neck in the photo. What is it and what is it's purpose? Looks like some sort of counter balance, but I can't see it in the other pictures.
Cheers Mike
That is a carrier peg .. it's screwed into the face plate and it's what spins the setup between the lathe centres.. as there is no chuck to hold the workpiece... you can just see it in the 4th pic at the back covered in dust...it's normally used with a "lathe dog" but not needed in this set up... picture of dogs below. Woof !
 

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mikeyb2

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Thanks Ken, that does answer a few questions. I've never seen such a set up. I did wonder how the work piece was driven when the motor shaft end only had such an attachment( I don't know the name of the pointy thing!) That's something else I've learned here. Cheers Mike
 

Timbuck

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Thanks Ken, that does answer a few questions. I've never seen such a set up. I did wonder how the work piece was driven when the motor shaft end only had such an attachment( I don't know the name of the pointy thing!) That's something else I've learned here. Cheers Mike
The pointy thing is called a centre ...there are dead centres and live centres ..the live one has a bearing in it so it spins freely.243B6209-EFB7-44F6-BA2A-34E9C1938A0E.png
 

mikeyb2

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Once again thanks, I should have known really as I do have a woodworking lathe which I haven't used in a while. I guess I've just forgotten again.
 

Timbuck

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I'm having to give the neck carving a rest for a short while due to getting a chest infection, most likely caused by the sawdust. :rolleyes:
 

lauburu

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I'm having to give the neck carving a rest for a short while due to getting a chest infection, most likely caused by the sawdust. :rolleyes:
My commiserations. Same happens to me with mahogany and cedar. Having to invest in a dust extraction system so I can live a little longer.
Miguel
 

Pegasus Guitars

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Ken- Have you ever tried doing the neck carving on a mill? I've been mentally working on a couple of scenarios for that, but am interested in any ideas you might have. I have been using the mill as an overarm router with a roundover bit with a bottom bearing that rides on a template.. However with the slow speed of the mill, only 5,000 RPM max, and a large roundover bit, things are hard to control when hand feeding the workpiece.. Easy to get chunks of wood taken off before you know it.I'm trying to get to a method where I can fasten the neck to the cross slide and use the power feed to push the neck through the bit. That way I could take consistently small safer incremental cuts. Just curious. You are the machinist around here and your ideas are always interesting. Thanks, Bob
 

Timbuck

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I can't find much on the web for manual milling necks, it's mostly CNC...I've tried CNC milling a neck and it was much too slow and the finish was rough and needed a lot of hand sanding... l use the milling machine just for dovetail neck blocks. ... It takes a lot of operations to produce a one piece neck from a billet. I use a bandsaw for 6 operations , and a router and templates setup for another 3 op's ... another 2 op's on lathe .and a couple of sessions on the belt sander, and finish the heel and volute by hand. From start to a finished neck ready for fretboard i recon about 40 mins ish. Providing everything is all set up first 😉
 

tonyturley

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40 minutes? Holy Smokes, it takes me at least that long just to shape the heel. Wow.
 

Titchtheclown

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You would need an extra long bit for heel clearance but a jig like this electric guitar shaping jig would work and adding dust extraction and closing off the top with nothing but a bit width slot in a rectangle of 4mm ply would keep the room dust free.

The clog making jig is probably overkill but would knock out necks two at a time in no time.
 

Timbuck

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That Guy has some good ideas Titch ... That's almost a wooden lathe with a router for the cutting tool ..I would call that " Plano-Milling" and I agree! he could modify it for machining two necks at a time.
 

Timbuck

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Chest infection improving but still got a bit of congestion...went in the workshop to day and set the bandsaw for resaw work, cut off a couple of slices to test it. ..tomorrow if I'm better I'll be back at work again, hopefully :unsure:..that's if Mrs T allows me.
 

Pete Howlett

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Overhead router Bob. Some guy about 10 years ago posted the method on YouTube. Here it is reposted

 
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