New MB Up for Auction

Joyful Uke

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Sounds beautiful. Good luck to anyone who is taking part in the auction.
 

necessaryrooster

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According to Chuck's website, he doesn't do commissions anymore, and he hasn't posted a uke on the site for sale for two years. I imagine if he ever did post one again it'd be gone before you could say "wow, cool."
 

Nickie

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I hope this doesn't sound critical, but why does this MB not sound as good as the others I've heard?
 

kerneltime

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I hope this doesn't sound critical, but why does this MB not sound as good as the others I've heard?
I thought it sounded splendid.. did you compare ulu top with ulu? With recordings I have found that they don’t really do justice in a good or bad way.. the feel of instrument can only be had in person.. I would trust Corey and Kalei’s reaction..
 

Poul Hansen

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Here we go again.

"$16.5K for a ukulele."

Stop devaluing your favourite instrument.

It is not a cheap toy anymore, and maybe never was.

If an artisan puts in the work to make a ukulele which is both a musical instrument and a work of art it is going to be worth a lot more than your Kala 15S ever was.

MBUs have been selling for $10K+ for several years now. It is nothing new.
I have 8 ukuleles but I still find their sound inferior to a classical guitar.(ooops, I said it :oops: )

And I think that a price like that is way beyond the value of the instrument, it is more than likely a result of greed. Some people think/hope it will increase in value, so they can make a profit on that ukulele in their bank vault.
 

Brockketcher

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I have 8 ukuleles but I still find their sound inferior to a classical guitar.(ooops, I said it :oops: )

And I think that a price like that is way beyond the value of the instrument, it is more than likely a result of greed. Some people think/hope it will increase in value, so they can make a profit on that ukulele in their bank vault.
Paul. Your not making any money on buying an ukulele for $20k. And even if you were, there’s a lot easier ways to make money with less risk. The reason people pay premiums for Chucks ukes is because he is considered, by many, one of the best luthiers alive today. As with most professions, the person considered to be the most talented, has always commanded a premium. Chuck probably spent 2-3 months making this uke and who knows how much time just thinking about it. If someone wanted to “make money” out of greed, buying ukuleles that cost $20k is NOT the way of going about it. My two cents.
 

kerneltime

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The best example of an appreciating ukulele is a vintage Martin.. if at that point in the past, one invested that money into the stock market (index fund) or bought property, that would have appreciated a lot more.. musical instruments are an investment into your soul and mind.
I know quite a few folks who own MBUs (including myself), we play the ukulele and find great joy from them, more than the joy we would get from an appreciating asset.
The risk of an ukulele getting damaged (nick, scratch, crack) is quite high over time, but folks still play them..
As far as classical guitar vs ukulele goes, they are very different. Yes classical guitar sounds amazing but so does an ukulele. Also, since you are looking at it from a monetary stand point. Chuck’s ukes are a steal for what they are, a similar guitar (classical or steel) would go for a lot more.. but even then none of them would classify as an investment.
People do make money buying and selling ukes, but if they purely wanted to make money, there are better and easier ways.
 

kerneltime

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I believe from what I have heard from wood workers.. if one is good with wood, then working on cabinets and other more widely used products is more financially rewarding than building ukes. Luthiers have a very hard and long journey and they do it cause they must due to what drives them. A lot of luthiers you will find started making ukes as a retirement gig, as they do it purely for passion and it cannot make sense financially before.

Folks like Chuck were artists and dedicated their life to their craft long before MBU became a thing. They had chosen this path long before they saw any fame or recognition. Chuck has been improving his craft and I think post stopping taking custom orders, he has produced some of his best work. A lot of owners of MBU land up owning more than one.. it is not by accident. They often own ukuleles from other builders as well.. so they are making quite an informed decision.

I love listening to podcasts such as the fretboard journal and luthier on luthier, to get an insight into the instrument making world.. the emergence of luthier built instruments has led to guitar and ukulele making to reach new heights. The guitars and ukuleles being built today are probably the best ever. Clubbed with our ability to connect world wide and learn from the best, is something spectacular we take for granted. Folks around the world can now learn the ukulele and buy some of the best ukuleles being made.. no wonder an instrument such a MBU sells well. We live in amazing times!
 
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richntacoma

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I have 8 ukuleles but I still find their sound inferior to a classical guitar.(ooops, I said it :oops: )

And I think that a price like that is way beyond the value of the instrument, it is more than likely a result of greed. Some people think/hope it will increase in value, so they can make a profit on that ukulele in their bank vault.
You are, it seems (and correct me if I am wrong) basing your evaluation on relatively cheap factory ukes? Certainly, not the best instruments for evaluating what a uke is capable of sounding, perhaps?
 

ripock

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This thread has become a bit asinine. We all blow our money on something. Some people blow their money on their home in landscaping and kitchen re-models and new flooring. Some people buy expensive cars when entry-level models do the same job. Some people spend hundreds per month on media services. I probably spend $3000 a year on whisky and pipe tobacco. So why all the fuss? You can't take it with you and if you leave it to your family, they'll make even stupider decisions with money they didn't even earn. So spend it. Moreover, all of us could afford a MB if we wanted to. All we'd have to do is not waste our money on other things and waste it on boutique ukuleles. So what's the big deal?
 

Brockketcher

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This thread has become a bit asinine. We all blow our money on something. Some people blow their money on their home in landscaping and kitchen re-models and new flooring. Some people buy expensive cars when entry-level models do the same job. Some people spend hundreds per month on media services. I probably spend $3000 a year on whisky and pipe tobacco. So why all the fuss? You can't take it with you and if you leave it to your family, they'll make even stupider decisions with money they didn't even earn. So spend it. Moreover, all of us could afford a MB if we wanted to. All we'd have to do is not waste our money on other things and waste it on boutique ukuleles. So what's the big deal?
😂. Best explanation so far.
 

VegasGeorge

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I have no idea why anyone would think a Ukulele is worth that much money. OK, I accept the premise that this is a great custom luthier, and an excellent example of his work, and an all around beautiful instrument. It still isn't worth that much money. It doesn't look that much better than less expensive Ukes. I'm sure it doesn't sound that much better either. So, what I'm saying is that as a musical instrument, it isn't worth it. Now, maybe as a work of art, or as a collector's item it's worth that much. But, only if it would go for that price or more at the next auction. That question depends on a history of comparable sales. Maybe it's there, maybe not. I really don't know. All I know, that as a Ukulele player, who actually uses his instruments, I wouldn't pay anywhere near that much for it.
 

richntacoma

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I have no idea why anyone would think a Ukulele is worth that much money. OK, I accept the premise that this is a great custom luthier, and an excellent example of his work, and an all around beautiful instrument. It still isn't worth that much money. It doesn't look that much better than less expensive Ukes. I'm sure it doesn't sound that much better either. So, what I'm saying is that as a musical instrument, it isn't worth it. Now, maybe as a work of art, or as a collector's item it's worth that much. But, only if it would go for that price or more at the next auction. That question depends on a history of comparable sales. Maybe it's there, maybe not. I really don't know. All I know, that as a Ukulele player, who actually uses his instruments, I wouldn't pay anywhere near that much for it.
So, what you are saying, is that it is not worth that much to YOU. Got it! But factually, it is worth that much as people keep buying it for that.

Now, that said, I agree with you that it is not worth that much to ME. Frankly, I find MB ukes a bit garish. Does that make them so? Nope, just my opinion. Would I love to play one for a month or so? You bet!

Yet, so say that you have no idea why anyone would pay that much might suggest a lack of understanding into the basics of capitalism, the nature of art and scarcity of the "best" expression of artistic media, and basic human nature.

Some people also just have more money than others. $300 is poop ton to some, while $5000 is just not that deep to others.
 

rainbow21

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Worth it to some, not worth it to others.

But I would love it if some Moore Bettah owners could chime in here with their stories. How did they decide to get one, how do they use it, what surprised them about it...
 

Blank Williams

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While I personally don’t go for instruments like his. I admit they are works of art and I can easily see why they go for the prices that they do. The materials appear top notch and the inlay work and tiny details are the work of a true craftsman. I’m glad there are independent luthiers out there doing this kind of stuff. Even though I can’t afford such things I’m glad that others can.