Octave down then up to D

Billy Rich

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Some have said that using a set of octave down (Guadalupe strings 1 octave lower than tenor) GCEA strings on a baritone leads to a muddy sound. Would tuning such a set up to ADF#B improve the sound while still giving low tones?
 
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clear

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Some have said that using a set of octave down GCEA strings on a baritone use leads to a muddy sound. Would tuning such a set up to D improve the sound while still giving low tones?

I'm not familiar with baritones, are you into the D2 (using middle C is C4) range? If so, then we don't distinguish bass /low frequencies as easily. So, wouldn't it sound muddy just based on science?
 

CPG

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I don't play Baritone, but I would think it would sound muddy. That said, try it and see.
 

Jim Hanks

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If the set is designed for G3, tuning it up to D4 - 7 half steps - would be a VERY high tension. That sounds like a good way to snap strings (at best) or damage a neck (at worst). If you want DGBE, get strings designed for that tuning.
 

Billy Rich

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I was thinking of the Guadalupe GCEA one octave lower than Tenor strings for Baritone, tuned up to ADF#B.
 
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Jim Hanks

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Ah. That makes more sense. That should be fine on the tension. Whether you like the feel or the sound is up to you. FWIW, I have a baritone guitalele tuned to Terz, so GCFBbDG and I don't think it sounds muddy at all but of course it has two higher treble strings to balance out the basses. Also FWIW, my tenor guitalele is ADGCEA and again doesn't sound muddy but again has the two extra trebles.

You just gotta try it