Quality high end tenor advice (Anuenue or ?)

Milesaway71

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I noticed that experienced players here seem to generally rate Anuenue (tenor) ukes quite highly and I have been looking for a good back up for my custom tenor circa 2006-7 which is my daily driver par excellence. I've put a lot of mileage on it and it was custom specced out to my preferences.

I'd like something as close to the highest level of playability and tone available, without going over the high $3,500 zone; new or very good condition used.
Aside from specs, as far as tone I want what Shawn from Ukulele Friend says; something like "professional level with good projection and sustain all the way up the fretboard...". I'm not exactly a pro but I wouldn't shell out more than a thousand and expect any less.
Playing a great uke can be an enriching experience.
I play mostly old school jazz standards with solos so I need that intonation and projection ( I like Spruce but I feel that it's a bit too treble for me)

Here's some specs from my daily which I'm looking for:
37-38mm nut width with reasonably good space from the edge.
Low action setup, low-G C E A. Excellent intonation.
17"+ scale; a bit longer than standard but I'll probably settle for standard 17.
Flat fretboard ( I love Ebony)
Binding... I don't care about bling.
Hawaiian Koa top side back. (I like Koa, Mahog, Cedar top tone woods)

From what i've seen Kamaka uses a 35-6 mm nut width? That's the only thing I'm hesitant about.
 

rainbow21

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Find an excuse to fly over to Oahu during hours The Ukulele Site is open and try the different ones. Let them know you are coming and what to have ready for you.

The aNueNue Moon Bird (or koa bird) series are wonderful. BUT they have a slight radiused fretboard which is often not noted on websites.
 

Steedy

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Sounds like a Kanile'a Tenor might fit the bill. Their KSR-T model sounds exceptionally good, has a 38mm nut, ebony fingerboard, and a very comfortable beveled arm rest.
 

merlin666

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You know what you want, and in that price range you can probably get a custom build to your specs from one of the Hawaiian K brands.
 

Dohle

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You know what you want, and in that price range you can probably get a custom build to your specs from one of the Hawaiian K brands.
Agreed. Finding a production model with those exact specs can be difficult.

aNueNue ukes are excellent quality. The Moon Bird tenor undoubtedly has the tone and projection you're looking for but it's spruce and rosewood. I'm fairly certain all Bird models have a 36mm nut regardless of size. The string spacing is generous, however, but that means there's not much room between the outer strings and the edge of the fretboard which is a typical issue with aNueNue. Otherwise, the koa Bird models would fit the bill perfectly. Admittedly, they have a slightly radiused fretboard as rainbow21 mentioned above but it's so slight it's pretty much negligible.

Kamaka produce some nice spruce and cedar topped tenors but, as you mentioned, the nut width is only 36mm. Kanile'a is otherwise a great option but I wouldn't necessarily associate their ukes with particularly great projection. The all koa models tend to sound more warm and mellow, in my opinion. You could go the custom route and order something like a cedar top Kanile'a but obviously it will cost you a lot more. I think the best production model might be a KoAloha tenor. Plenty of projection, comes with a low g out of the box, basically ticks every box regarding your specs. The only issue I can think of is that while the nut width is 37mm the string spacing is much narrower than most other ukes at that nut width. Of course that leaves lots of room at the edges of the fretboard which might be a selling point for some.
 

Milesaway71

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You know what you want, and in that price range you can probably get a custom build to your specs from one of the Hawaiian K brands.
I noticed that experienced players here seem to generally rate Anuenue (tenor) ukes quite highly and I have been looking for a good back up for my custom tenor circa 2006-7 which is my daily driver par excellence. I've put a lot of mileage on it and it was custom specced out to my preferences.

I'd like something as close to the highest level of playability and tone available, without going over the high $3,500 zone; new or very good condition used.
Aside from specs, as far as tone I want what Shawn from Ukulele Friend says; something like "professional level with good projection and sustain all the way up the fretboard...". I'm not exactly a pro but I wouldn't shell out more than a thousand and expect any less.
Playing a great uke can be an enriching experience.
I play mostly old school jazz standards with solos so I need that intonation and projection ( I like Spruce but I feel that it's a bit too treble for me)

Here's some specs from my daily which I'm looking for:
37-38mm nut width with reasonably good space from the edge.
Low action setup, low-G C E A. Excellent intonation.
17"+ scale; a bit longer than standard but I'll probably settle for standard 17.
Flat fretboard ( I love Ebony)
Binding... I don't care about bling.
Hawaiian Koa top side back. (I like Koa, Mahog, Cedar top tone woods)

From what i've seen Kamaka uses a 35-6 mm nut width? That's the only thing I'm hesitant about.
Agreed. Finding a production model with those exact specs can be difficult.

aNueNue ukes are excellent quality. The Moon Bird tenor undoubtedly has the tone and projection you're looking for but it's spruce and rosewood. I'm fairly certain all Bird models have a 36mm nut regardless of size. The string spacing is generous, however, but that means there's not much room between the outer strings and the edge of the fretboard which is a typical issue with aNueNue. Otherwise, the koa Bird models would fit the bill perfectly. Admittedly, they have a slightly radiused fretboard as rainbow21 mentioned above but it's so slight it's pretty much negligible.

Kamaka produce some nice spruce and cedar topped tenors but, as you mentioned, the nut width is only 36mm. Kanile'a is otherwise a great option but I wouldn't necessarily associate their ukes with particularly great projection. The all koa models tend to sound more warm and mellow, in my opinion. You could go the custom route and order something like a cedar top Kanile'a but obviously it will cost you a lot more. I think the best production model might be a KoAloha tenor. Plenty of projection, comes with a low g out of the box, basically ticks every box regarding your specs. The only issue I can think of is that while the nut width is 37mm the string spacing is much narrower than most other ukes at that nut width. Of course that leaves lots of room at the edges of the fretboard which might be a selling point for some.
Dohle, Yep.. I hear you. My daily player has about 4mm edge room, and about 10mm between each string which is plenty.
Doing the math I'd want 37mm nut width.
I tend to avoid Kamaka and Koaloha tenors; any production tenors. Most are warm and mellow as you say, but lack tone when you play up the neck and solos. I had a Koaloha tenor for a short time back in 2005-6 too.

Spruce definitely projects, but a great Koa, Mahog (or Cedar) tenor that projects is amazing.
I've played production tenors back then; Koaloha, and other brands including a couple vintage Martin tenors.
The productions just didn't make it. Back in the old days ukes were for strumming and that's what they made them for and I think they still do (Eddie Kamae and Ohta San notwithstanding -actually a vintage Martin soprano really rings out).
Side point: old Martin sopranos and concerts are amazing and the Koaloha concert is unreal too. Every one I've tried was amazing.

I was buying and selling as I tried them until I found a luthier online who was having great feedback and wasn't too backed up. He spent a lot of time with his customers. It's what I have now; I bought one, then another and another; all fantastic. Easy to sell as I settled with the ones I kept.
I may be wrong but I mentioned to a store owner that I was convinced that ie Jake's tenors have that oomph because the builder of those high end Kamaka's (Casey) spent more time top-tuning them, but he said that while Casey did make the "one a year model" that sells in the store for like $3500 and up in stores, basically its just the cosmetics. I have a hard time agreeing with him. That said I would need to have confidence in a builder before I would order one. My uke's luthier is long retired and I don't have the oomph anymore to research builders.

Merlin666, back in 2006 I went to a Uke Guild of Hawaii show in Waikiki and it was a blast. Musicguymic bought a tenor from my luthier that I brought to show. So many custom ukes. I'd fancy taking a trip for that and take some time sampling the stores too. I checked this year but didn't find anything scheduled yet.
At least I have my perfect all Koa player so I can't complain.
 

Bluesy

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Consider emailing Shawn at Ukulele Friend in addition to The Ukulele Site. (Both businesses are excellent.) Tell him what specs interest you, and if he doesn't have it, he'll eventually come across something that may be just right for you. Ukulele Friend has access to the fine luthier built models, some gently used, which would fit into your budget parameters.

A trip through his archives will give you a sense of the kind of instruments that are his specialty.

I've recently dealt with Shawn; he listens and is straightforward and professional.

Bluesy.
 

Arik

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I wonder if you should just commission another custom uke. Hank Johnson at Kimo Ukulele builds some awesome ukes. You could give him all your specs and materials. His ukes are great and won't break the bank. I have 2 of his ukes. His sound is generally warm and projects a ton.
 

Dohle

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Dohle, Yep.. I hear you. My daily player has about 4mm edge room, and about 10mm between each string which is plenty.
Doing the math I'd want 37mm nut width.
I tend to avoid Kamaka and Koaloha tenors; any production tenors. Most are warm and mellow as you say, but lack tone when you play up the neck and solos. I had a Koaloha tenor for a short time back in 2005-6 too.
Well you certainly know what you like and don't like. I definitely agree on the Kamaka. I would've thought KoAloha tenors had projection similarly to their sopranos and concerts (which indeed are really good) but, in all fairness, I haven't played one of their tenors. Shows you what I know. :D

I can't believe I forgot to mention this previously but an aNueNue Lion tenor would be right up your alley. Cedar top, koa back and sides, and additionally a really funky look (not for everyone, granted). The only issue, again, is the narrow nut / lack of space at the edges of the fretboard. But I still you should definitely look into it and consider one.

Otherwise, I think the custom route might be the easiest way to go, be it a Kanile'a custom or something else.
 

Milesaway71

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Consider emailing Shawn at Ukulele Friend in addition to The Ukulele Site. (Both businesses are excellent.) Tell him what specs interest you, and if he doesn't have it, he'll eventually come across something that may be just right for you. Ukulele Friend has access to the fine luthier built models, some gently used, which would fit into your budget parameters.

A trip through his archives will give you a sense of the kind of instruments that are his specialty.

I've recently dealt with Shawn; he listens and is straightforward and professional.

Bluesy.
Bluesy! I always marvel at the work Shawn has been doing over the years. Some of the best instruments in the world pass through his hands. A bit pricey but for exclusive stuff it come with the territory. He has had some from my luthier (William King) when he was working. I actually have been looking for used King tenors for years online without any luck. Congrats on your deal with Shawn. i live on Kauai and don't get around much to say the least... I should contact him since he knows a lot and where I'm coming from as we used to say.
 

Milesaway71

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Well you certainly know what you like and don't like. I definitely agree on the Kamaka. I would've thought KoAloha tenors had projection similarly to their sopranos and concerts (which indeed are really good) but, in all fairness, I haven't played one of their tenors. Shows you what I know. :D

I can't believe I forgot to mention this previously but an aNueNue Lion tenor would be right up your alley. Cedar top, koa back and sides, and additionally a really funky look (not for everyone, granted). The only issue, again, is the narrow nut / lack of space at the edges of the fretboard. But I still you should definitely look into it and consider one.

Otherwise, I think the custom route might be the easiest way to go, be it a Kanile'a custom or something else.
Wow I didn't know Anuenue was from Corey and Mica dudes who i respect a lot. That matters, and I didn't even know about the brand. I saw the name a few years ago and figured it was another custom operation. So we are talking like a "better production uke" type of thing, and who better to do that than those guys in middle of everything uke.
I'm listening to youtube on the AMM3 by Ukulele Solos... good stuff. I like the Bird cutaway though not essential. Nice tone... not too tinny in the trebles. I saw the lion too... hmm. A very interesting company... how would you compare to Pono? Not much talk about Koolau as far as I can see.
I can't imagine these guys would screw up on the string spacing. Is it been an issue for players here?

Pulling the trigger on custom consignment is another story. I think talking to Shawn and maybe Corey, Mica would help me with find someone and I am not at all averse to getting a used custom if the price is right.
It would cost me a lot of time and close to a grand to make a visit to Honolulu for a couple days but not out of the question. I grew up there but left in the late 60's... to Bay Area, and to Kauai 30 yrs ago.
I appreciate all the feedback from you all.
Here's a shot of my magic daily driver. I can't believe I took that shot in 2008.
 

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rainbow21

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Looks like you can get a really early morning flight and late return flight for about $100. Then a friend can drive you to see Shawn and then up to Haleiwa to try the ukes. Plate lunch from Giovanni's.

Corey and Kalei are in charge of the aNueNue USA site. I believe they also both work for The Ukulele Site (HMS) which carries the aNueNue ukes as well. So one trip to The Uke Site will likely allow you to sample all the ukes on the aNueNue site as well if you contact them in advance.

Otherwise you can order an uke with a return policy, but likely have to pay shipping costs. Better to ship yourself there and try multiple ukes that may or not fit your needs.

EDIT: just posted five minutes ago:
 

Dohle

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Wow I didn't know Anuenue was from Corey and Mica dudes who i respect a lot. That matters, and I didn't even know about the brand. I saw the name a few years ago and figured it was another custom operation. So we are talking like a "better production uke" type of thing, and who better to do that than those guys in middle of everything uke.
I'm listening to youtube on the AMM3 by Ukulele Solos... good stuff. I like the Bird cutaway though not essential. Nice tone... not too tinny in the trebles. I saw the lion too... hmm. A very interesting company... how would you compare to Pono? Not much talk about Koolau as far as I can see.
I can't imagine these guys would screw up on the string spacing. Is it been an issue for players here?
To be absolutely clear, Corey and Kalei started aNueNue USA which is the distribution arm of aNueNue in the US. I don't think Mika is involved other than at the Ukulele Site which obviously also stocks aNueNue ukes. aNueNue itself is a Taiwanese company who produce their ukes in China. All of their ukes mentioned in this thread are production models but they are excellent quality, definitely on-par with anything coming out of Hawaii. Comparing aNueNue to Pono is like comparing apples and oranges. Pono ukes have a quintessentially Hawaiian tone to them in my opinion, warm and mellow, not much volume or projection. aNueNue is the opposite, loads of projection, the Moon Birds particularly are cannons, but they're not all treble either, very balanced I'd say. Probably my favourite uke brand.

I wouldn't say the string spacing is screwed per se. The spacing itself is generous between each string, as I mentioned. The only issue is with the space between the outer strings and the edge of the fretboard which is a bit tighter than most other ukes I've played. That being said, I've really experienced issues with it on my Moon Bird soprano. I'm not sure why that is but it might have to do with string tension since it's the lowest on the soprano. The string spacing seems to be identical on my concert koa Bird but I have no issues with, e.g, pulling strings outside the fretboard with that uke. It's probably even less of an issue with a tenor.
 

Cadia

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Wow I didn't know Anuenue was from Corey and Mica dudes who i respect a lot. That matters, and I didn't even know about the brand. I saw the name a few years ago and figured it was another custom operation. So we are talking like a "better production uke" type of thing, and who better to do that than those guys in middle of everything uke.
I'm listening to youtube on the AMM3 by Ukulele Solos... good stuff. I like the Bird cutaway though not essential. Nice tone... not too tinny in the trebles. I saw the lion too... hmm. A very interesting company... how would you compare to Pono? Not much talk about Koolau as far as I can see.
I can't imagine these guys would screw up on the string spacing. Is it been an issue for players here?

Pulling the trigger on custom consignment is another story. I think talking to Shawn and maybe Corey, Mica would help me with find someone and I am not at all averse to getting a used custom if the price is right.
It would cost me a lot of time and close to a grand to make a visit to Honolulu for a couple days but not out of the question. I grew up there but left in the late 60's... to Bay Area, and to Kauai 30 yrs ago.
I appreciate all the feedback from you all.
Here's a shot of my magic daily driver. I can't believe I took that shot in 2008.
The aNueNues are really nice. I have an AMM3 which I'm very pleased with, in fact it's my favorite uke. I was going to get a Moonbird next. But instead, I just bought a Maestro UT-MR, made in Singapore by Maestro guitars. German spruce top, Madagascar rosewood back and sides. These are handmade by a small team of luthiers to high standards, and supposedly hand-voiced by it's owner, luthier Hozen. What I can say is that the uke is extremely well made, of high quality, and the loudest I have ever played, with full lows and chiming highs. Baz calls it a cannon. Some links for you:

World of Ukes in the UK has several Maestro models on special right now, but he is sold out of the UT MR. You'll have to scroll to the bottom of the list for the Maestros.


Also, both Kanile'a and KoAloha have changed some things in their construction in the last several years, particularly in the bracing. I think they probably sound even better than when you played them. My KoAloha KTM-00 has really good volume, and a warm, rich tone. My Kanile'a is so resonant and full, lots of overtones. All of these are much finer ukes than Pono, including the aNueNues. And I do like Pono.
 
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Milesaway71

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The aNueNues are really nice. I have an AMM3 which I'm very pleased with, in fact it's my favorite uke. I was going to get a Moonbird next. But instead, I just bought a Maestro UT-MR, made in Singapore by Maestro guitars. German spruce top, Madagascar rosewood back and sides. These are handmade by a small team of luthiers to high standards, and supposedly hand-voiced by it's owner, luthier Hozen. What I can say is that the uke is extremely well made, of high quality, and the loudest I have ever played, with full lows and chiming highs. Baz calls it a cannon. Some links for you:

World of Ukes in the UK has several Maestro models on special right now, but he is sold out of the UT MR. You'll have to scroll to the bottom of the list for the Maestros.


Also, both Kanile'a and KoAloha have changed some things in their construction in the last several years, particularly in the bracing. I think they probably sound even better than when you played them. My KoAloha KTM-00 has really good volume, and a warm, rich tone. My Kanile'a is so resonant and full, lots of overtones. All of these are much finer ukes than Pono, including the aNueNues. And I do like Pono.
Thanks Cadia,
Are you in the UK? Is that where you ordered, or through Maestro?

I wondered about your Koaloha tenor right under the Kanilea in your signature... I got a tenor around 2004 or '05. I was excited but I sold it shortly after getting a custom around the same time as it didn't compare well in resonance and projection. I went through a lot of tenors back then always looking for more of what I like. Customs were starting to become a thing.
Eventually I settled into playing the one I liked the best and never really paid attention to what has been happening.
In those days imo the quality gap between production and custom was wide. Actually though you had to be pretty serious, or rich, because the cost increase for some of the small nuances (that are big to me) are costly in a custom. It takes a lot of time and money to hand make a good uke and a luthier's skill, and reputation, is on the line.

Back then I found it interesting that vintage Martin sopranos and concerts (which are production ukes) were awesome. I've had both, and sampling the K's the Koaloha concert is also wonderful. Everyone I knew personally or read online agreed and I will recommend them whole heartedly. If I was a concert or soprano player I'd have kept those 3 and be done with it all.

At the time I figured the tenors (from both brands) would be similarly great but was disappointed.
Same with old Martin baritones. My theory was that the size of the smaller body and scale length was the difference, maybe more resonance due to the shorter scales... but that didn't pan out with a couple of the Kamaka concerts that I tried.
Someone here pointed out that since the tenors use the same strings as the smaller ukes the tension would be greater which suggests more resonance which throws my theory out the window. Lol, I'm no tech person.
But I am still convinced that it takes a special build to get the tenor to be as resonant as I like. Projection, loudness, is great, but to have it balanced and sweet is another. When I heard Jake and some other pros I knew it could be done, and with Koa or Mahogany the mid ranged tone woods.
Thanks so much for the Maestro tip.
I like the review; lots of detail to say the least! I like the nut width and string spacing; 30mm G to A leaves 7 for the edges. Check. The beveled arm rest is really something I could appreciate. It's fairly humid in Hawaii and on hot days wow, lots of sweat drips right down there. My daily is pretty gummed up there and on the neck; it's yuck. I imagine it makes it less susceptible to buildup and easier to clean.
Production ukes that go ahead and make some degree of radius is a question for me, not having used one. I imagine it's pretty neutral. As far as I know, yet reading up on radius' the jury is out on that one.
I checked out the Custom section on Maestro site and worked something up. The site is super well done and have to say the main builder is impressive. He reminds me of William King, or most dedicated luthiers. I like how he pays special attention to tuning the soundboard for responsiveness.
Ordering a custom build seems to cost quite a bit more even without some of the many features on your UT-MR. I'm not sure if there are much differences in build quality/value between the two and according to the site they all get top tuning.
I'm going to enquire more.

Does anyone want to comment on the side port ? Does it have any effect if you amplify?
 

Cadia

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Thanks Cadia,
Are you in the UK? Is that where you ordered, or through Maestro?

I wondered about your Koaloha tenor right under the Kanilea in your signature... I got a tenor around 2004 or '05. I was excited but I sold it shortly after getting a custom around the same time as it didn't compare well in resonance and projection. I went through a lot of tenors back then always looking for more of what I like. Customs were starting to become a thing.
Eventually I settled into playing the one I liked the best and never really paid attention to what has been happening.
In those days imo the quality gap between production and custom was wide. Actually though you had to be pretty serious, or rich, because the cost increase for some of the small nuances (that are big to me) are costly in a custom. It takes a lot of time and money to hand make a good uke and a luthier's skill, and reputation, is on the line.

Back then I found it interesting that vintage Martin sopranos and concerts (which are production ukes) were awesome. I've had both, and sampling the K's the Koaloha concert is also wonderful. Everyone I knew personally or read online agreed and I will recommend them whole heartedly. If I was a concert or soprano player I'd have kept those 3 and be done with it all.

At the time I figured the tenors (from both brands) would be similarly great but was disappointed.
Same with old Martin baritones. My theory was that the size of the smaller body and scale length was the difference, maybe more resonance due to the shorter scales... but that didn't pan out with a couple of the Kamaka concerts that I tried.
Someone here pointed out that since the tenors use the same strings as the smaller ukes the tension would be greater which suggests more resonance which throws my theory out the window. Lol, I'm no tech person.
But I am still convinced that it takes a special build to get the tenor to be as resonant as I like. Projection, loudness, is great, but to have it balanced and sweet is another. When I heard Jake and some other pros I knew it could be done, and with Koa or Mahogany the mid ranged tone woods.
Thanks so much for the Maestro tip.
I like the review; lots of detail to say the least! I like the nut width and string spacing; 30mm G to A leaves 7 for the edges. Check. The beveled arm rest is really something I could appreciate. It's fairly humid in Hawaii and on hot days wow, lots of sweat drips right down there. My daily is pretty gummed up there and on the neck; it's yuck. I imagine it makes it less susceptible to buildup and easier to clean.
Production ukes that go ahead and make some degree of radius is a question for me, not having used one. I imagine it's pretty neutral. As far as I know, yet reading up on radius' the jury is out on that one.
I checked out the Custom section on Maestro site and worked something up. The site is super well done and have to say the main builder is impressive. He reminds me of William King, or most dedicated luthiers. I like how he pays special attention to tuning the soundboard for responsiveness.
Ordering a custom build seems to cost quite a bit more even without some of the many features on your UT-MR. I'm not sure if there are much differences in build quality/value between the two and according to the site they all get top tuning.
I'm going to enquire more.

Does anyone want to comment on the side port ? Does it have any effect if you amplify?
I'm in the US. It was my first time ordering from the UK, and I have to say it was an easy experience from World of Ukes. No shipping, no extra charges, sent on Monday, arrived on Thursday. This uke has such good volume it really doesn't need a soundport. I don't amplify, so I can't comment there. The radius, if there is one, is ever so slight and is not something noticeable at all. It seems virtually flat until you look at the edges of the frets, there it seems just slightly radiused. Nothing like a Cocobolo radius. There's a lot of thought and care in the details of this instrument. I like the fretboard width and the string spacing. World of Ukes has a video comparing it to the Moonbird, and they are very similar in sound, with the Moonbird sounding a bit more "controlled", for lack of a better word. I do love the tonal qualities the Madagascar rosewood brings in. I had perused Maestro's custom page and wondered if it was something you'd be interested in, though I have no idea of their pricing. Regarding the KoAloha KTM, HMS has a podcast where they introduced the new ones, and talked a bit about the differences in construction and sound. The older ones do sound different.
 
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Kenn2018

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You might check with David Ingalls at Ono ukuleles. He has some new designs that sound terrific. He might have a spec, 18" long tenor. His Wahoo model has an 18" neck. John Kinnard sometimes has spec instruments on his site. There is an 18" neck tenor model he makes.
 

Milesaway71

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3
I'm in the US. It was my first time ordering from the UK, and I have to say it was an easy experience from World of Ukes. No shipping, no extra charges, sent on Monday, arrived on Thursday. This uke has such good volume it really doesn't need a soundport. I don't amplify, so I can't comment there. The radius, if there is one, is ever so slight and is not something noticeable at all. It seems virtually flat until you look at the edges of the frets, there it seems just slightly radiused. Nothing like a Cocobolo radius. There's a lot of thought and care in the details of this instrument. I like the fretboard width and the string spacing. World of Ukes has a video comparing it to the Moonbird, and they are very similar in sound, with the Moonbird sounding a bit more "controlled", for lack of a better word. I do love the tonal qualities the Madagascar rosewood brings in. I had perused Maestro's custom page and wondered if it was something you'd be interested in, though I have no idea of their pricing. Regarding the KoAloha KTM, HMS has a podcast where they introduced the new ones, and talked a bit about the differences in construction and sound. The older ones do sound different.
I tried out the custom page and you'd be surprised how high it will get for what you already have on your, or other high end models. I like the Koa UT-KO tenor.
How does the action come? I like it as low as possible without any buzz.
If these pan out they could be the best bargain for the money.